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With Good Reason

Arts & Culture

Each week on With Good Reason we explore a world of ideas with leading scholars in literature, history, science, philosophy, and the arts. With Good Reason is created by Virginia Humanities and the Virginia Higher Education Broadcasting Consortium.

Location:

Charlottesville, VA

Description:

Each week on With Good Reason we explore a world of ideas with leading scholars in literature, history, science, philosophy, and the arts. With Good Reason is created by Virginia Humanities and the Virginia Higher Education Broadcasting Consortium.

Language:

English

Contact:

145 Ednam Drive, Charlottesville, VA 1 877 451 5098


Episodes

REPLAY: Life Without Boundaries

2/22/2024
19th and 20th century poet, Alice Meynell–a.k.a. “the penciling mama”--described motherhood as “life without boundaries.” Cristina Richieri Griffin discusses the Victorian mother of eight’s complicated feelings on mothering. And: The 2003 Haitian novel, The Infamous Rosalie, tells the stories of generations of women who are enslaved on a plantation. Ima Hicks explores how for these women, mothering was a particularly complicated act. Later in the show: Camilla Morrison believes that a costume design can explore existential ideas like what it means to be a woman and how women grapple with motherhood. Plus: In recent years, experiences of postpartum depression that used to be whispered about are now shouted on tik tok and instagram. Marion Young has studied maternal depression and shares one way it changes how mothers parent.

Duration:00:52:00

Selfish

2/16/2024
Imagine if everyday you went to work and pretended to be someone else. That’s life for professional actors. Robyn Berg says self care is essential for acting professionals to stay themselves while pretending to be other people. And: Self care can get conflated with selfishness. Peter Thaxter started thinking about that after a student interviewed him about selfishness. Now, he’s clear on why self care and selfishness are not the same. Later in the show: Our childhood affects who we become. And Adrian Bravo has found that in seven countries, childhood trauma has nurtured alcohol dependency in adulthood. Plus: All sexes deal with PTSD. But Timothy Jarome has found that a certain protein in women’s brain makes them experience PTSD differently.

Duration:00:52:00

Let's Talk About Love, Baby

2/8/2024
Valentine’s Day today means candy hearts and stuffed bears. But Kat Tracy says the origins of the holiday are far from cute and fuzzy–and they don’t have a whole lot to do with St. Valentine. And: A safe and secure relationship seems like an obvious goal, but it’s surprisingly hard to achieve. Amber Pope shares how attachment theory and strong support networks can help people thrive in a safe and secure partnership. Later in the show: A thriving intimate relationship starts long before the meet-cute. Dayna Henry says early, comprehensive, age-appropriate sex education makes for happier, healthier relationships later in life. Plus: True love – is it in the head or the heart? Or the gut? No, this is not about your microbiome determining your love life. Instead, Lindsey Hicks wants to talk about what our gut reactions say about how our relationships are really going.

Duration:00:52:00

REPLAY: Expanding Our Origin Story

2/1/2024
Cauline Yates was at a family reunion the first time she heard she was a descendant of Thomas Jefferson. She later helped develop the Memorial to Enslaved Laborers at the University of Virginia. And: Clint Smith is the author of the award-winning book, How the Word is Passed: A Reckoning with the History of Slavery Across America. He traveled to 9 historic sites to understand how slavery is remembered and taught. Later in the Show: Gayle Jessup White was on a tour at Monticello when she raised her hand and told the guide she was related to Sally Hemings. She says that moment changed her life forever. Her memoir, Reclamation: Sally Hemings, Thomas Jefferson and a Descendant’s Search for Her Family’s Lasting Legacy, chronicles uncovering her family’s roots at Thomas Jefferson’s home. Plus: Descendants recently gained structural parity at James Madison’s plantation home, Montpelier. When this interview was originally recorded, James French represented the descendant community on Montpelier’s board.

Duration:00:52:00

In The Wake of Sea Level Rise

1/25/2024
In 2011, Japan was rocked by a magnitude 9.1 earthquake. It triggered a tsunami that measured 130 feet high - killing around 18,000 people and causing untold damage. Tina Dura and Robert Weiss say sea level rise will now allow even weaker earthquakes to cause tsunamis with similar destruction. And: Sea level rise is also endangering white cedar trees. Rob Atkinson and Linda Manning run the Fear to Hope project, which gets high school students out in the field to help protect white cedar trees from extinction. Later in the show: Liesel Ritchie and Duane Gill have gone around the world, talking with people who’ve had their lives upended by oil spills. They say we process the emotional trauma of natural disasters differently than man-made disasters. Plus: Disasters often hit historically marginalized communities the hardest. Nakeina Douglas-Glenn is the Director of the Research Institute for Social Equality. She’s helping to ensure equitable outcomes for vulnerable communities impacted by disaster.

Duration:00:52:00

The Next Pandemic

1/19/2024
Beverly Sher has been teaching her “Emerging Diseases” seminar since 1996. From AIDS in the 1990s, SARS in 2003, the H1N1 pandemic in 2009 and the modern COVID-19 pandemic, students realize what public health crises reveal about the psychology and sociology of a nation. And: Since it was first identified in the United States in 1975, Lyme disease has become the world’s most common disease to spread from animals to humans through the bite of infected ticks. The sooner it's treated, the better the possible outcome for the patient. This is good news. Except that current testing for Lyme disease takes weeks. Brandon Jutras and his team are working on a rapid, at-home Lyme detection test. Later in the show: COVID-19 isn’t over. Sara Reed Houser says that the proof is in the wastewater. Plus: You may or may not have been infected by a parasitic nematode in your life. Not to worry, though. It was just that ringworm in kindergarten. Why Mandy Kyle Gibson is deliberately introducing parasitic nematodes to an environment to help solve a problem.

Duration:00:52:00

Digging In

1/11/2024
When we dig deep underground, we get a chance to dig deeper into history. Dennis Blanton wants to change the way we think about America’s beginnings. He’s studying the expedition of a Spanish conquistador who was the first European in many parts of the Southeast. And: At “The Cove” along the Staunton River in Virginia, Brian Bates and his students have uncovered nearly 10,000 items that paint a picture of a thousand year old Sappony Indians fishing camp. Later in the show: Along with tools, pottery, and human remains, prehistoric sites are filled with ancient bird bones. Tal Simmons says these bones tell us what ancient humans ate, worshiped, and perhaps how they hunted. A discovery of seven prehistoric bird bone whistles might be the world’s oldest duck call. Plus: Before a state road gets moved or expanded, a team of archeologists comes in to dig for historical “treasure”. Elizabeth Monroe talks about a massive pile of oyster shells she uncovered and what they tell us about the people who used to live in the area.

Duration:00:52:00

REPLAY The Pets We Love

1/4/2024
In the earlier stages of the pandemic, when many people were still staying as close to home as possible, nearly 1 in 5 American households adopted a pet. Furry cats and snuggly dogs–and some temperamental pigs. Sherrie Clark is a veterinarian who treats and studies pet pigs. She says they make good pets–for the right family. And: Relationships between dogs and humans go back 10,000 years. Nancy Gee says that today relationships between people and pooches improve health outcomes for everyone with two or four legs. Later in the show: As a kid, Wynne DiGrassie was always bringing lizards and small snakes home in her pockets. After years focused on work as a horse veterinarian, Wynne has fallen back in love with reptiles. She talks about the common mistakes lizard and snake owners make and what it’s like inviting these slithery friends into your home. Plus: Cats rule the internet and they’ve been part of it from the beginning. Dylan Wittkower gets philosophical about why we can’t stop making and sharing cat memes.

Duration:00:52:00

REPLAY: Protecting Human Rights

12/28/2023
Kirsten Gelsdorf has spent over 20 years working for the United Nations and other organizations in the humanitarian sector. She discusses her experience in disaster zones and clears up some commonly held misconceptions about humanitarian aid. And: Only 10 states have passed a Bill of Rights for domestic workers. But Jennifer Fish says while it’s certainly a step in the right direction, these protections often exist only on paper. Jennifer has been named an Outstanding Faculty member by The State Council of Higher Education for Virginia. Later in the show: According to the Guinness Book of World Records, The Universal Declaration of Human Rights is the most translated document in the world. But it’s not typically taught in American classrooms. Eric Bonds says we could learn a lot from studying the document and applying its moral framework to our communities right here in the United States. Plus: Before the Cold War, UN peacekeeping missions were conducted almost entirely by the United States and Western European countries. But now developing countries have started to take the lead. Tim Passmore says this may signal a larger shift in the global power structure.

Duration:00:52:00

What Makes A Place?

12/21/2023
It’s almost impossible to look back on family road trips without thinking of Cracker Barrel. Cracker Barrels have a distinct sense of place - like going home to your grandparents house. But they also look exactly the same wherever you go. Meredith Gregory studies what she calls the paradox of Cracker Barrel. And: Two and a half years ago, Tim Baird and his family moved into a new home - a seemingly ordinary life event. But his new digs also came with 600 college students. The building is called the Creativity and Innovation District. It’s on Virginia Tech’s campus and has been intentionally built to foster community. He’s using the CID building to study how a space becomes a place. Later in the show: In the 1500’s, Spain and Portugal saw the New World as an enticing space to extend their empires and generate wealth. But they had no clue what was actually out there. Ricardo Padron says Spain’s vision for the New World had North America connected to East Asia. Plus: When she was a kid, Joanna Eleftheriou moved from New York City to her father’s homeland in Cyprus, a majority greek-speaking island in the Mediterranean. Her book, This Way Back, is a collection of essays that chronicles that journey along with her search for the meaning of home.

Duration:00:52:00

Holiday Hand Me Downs

12/14/2023
As we age, we come to appreciate the holiday traditions of our youth. Ricky Mullins remembers receiving treat bags at his small, backroads church. The poke bags were stuffed oranges, peanuts, cracker jacks and sometimes even a chocolate bar. Now, he’s passing the tradition along to the youth at the church that he pastors. And: Mary Lou Williams was a renowned jazz pianist and composer. She brought sacred Black jazz music to Duke University’s chapel every year. Gayle Murchison shares some of Williams’ music with us. Later in the show: How Ryan Stouffer learned the value of fellowshipping over food from his dad’s rib spot. Plus: Mary Beth Matthews walks us through how the American traditions of Hanukkah and Christmas have changed over the years.

Duration:00:52:00

Cravings

12/8/2023
The holiday season is about cheer, gathering with loved ones and, of course, food. Alex DiFeliceantonio warns that ultra processed foods—like the ones on your holiday snack table—are actually addictive. She wants food manufacturers to include processing information on their labels. And: Healthy nutrition for Virginia Indian communities is about more than just the food on the table—it’s also about how that food got there. Troy Wiipongwii and Zach Conrad are building software that helps Virginia Indians plan to grow their own food. Later in the show: Tracy Conder shares some of her favorite strategies for sticking to a balanced diet, even during the holidays. Plus: If you google “Lebron James’ diet” there are hundreds of hits that come back. Same for Lionel Messi or Dak Prescott. Nutrition is just part of being a pro athlete these days. But back in the 1990s, when Eddie Shen was a pro soccer player in China, nutrition wasn’t part of his training at all. And: Zidong Li helps us understand the latest research on nutrition for sports and fitness.

Duration:00:52:00

Winning NIL

11/30/2023
NIL sent shockwaves through college athletics when it was signed into law in 2021. Now student-athletes could earn money off of their name, image, and likeness. But there weren’t any guide-rails to help student-athletes navigate the new NIL landscape. Enter Kim Whitler. She co-wrote Athlete Brands: How to Benefit from Your Name, Image and Likeness. And: In 2020, Sha’Carri Richardson was barred from representing Team USA at the Tokyo Olympics because she tested positive for marajuana. Jo Morrison says there are many other elite athletes like Richardson who’ve had their reputations tarnished for taking banned substances that have little to no evidence of enhancing performance. Later in the show: For runners, there’s nothing like the freedom of lacing up your shoes and putting foot to pavement, logging mile after mile in the open air. Sabrina Little studies how running can hone virtues that are beneficial to life outside of sports. Plus: While golf might not be a high-octane contact sport like basketball or football, it’s something you can play throughout your life and even into your later years. Carray Banks is on a mission to generate funding to field both womens and mens golf teams at all HBCU’s in the Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference.

Duration:00:52:00

Seeking Refuge

11/22/2023
Worldwide there are more than 35 million refugees who have fled their homes. And when other countries take in a huge influx of those refugees, there’s a lot to consider. Erika Frydenlund studies how host countries can help manage a refugee surge. And: In March 2023, the William & Mary Law School’s Immigration Clinic had their very first approval of an asylum case–a client from Afghanistan, who fled when Kabul fell. Stacy Kern-Scheerer shares what it’s like navigating the complicated asylum system. Later in the show: The war in Ukraine created the largest refugee crisis since World War II. Patrick Rhamey says that Poland has taken in the most refugees–and actually done a good job of welcoming and resettling them. Plus: In the U.S., mainstream media has given the Ukrainian refugee crisis a lot of coverage. Nearly every day brings new headlines about it. On the other hand, the tens of millions of people making up Africa’s refugee crises are largely overlooked. Soji Akomolafe speaks to what’s causing so much movement in Africa and why Western countries aren’t paying enough attention.

Duration:00:52:00

Dinner Theatre

11/17/2023
Michael Carter Jr left America looking for home in Ghana. Now, on his fifth generation farm, he’s growing farmers through what he calls Africulture. And: How Virginia’s maritime climate enhances its fruit, according to celebrated sommelier Lee Campell. Later in the show: In Richmond, Virginia, you can walk up to one of 13 community refrigerators and get what you need. No questions asked. It all started because Taylor Scott had some extra tomatoes to spare. And: How Leni Sorenson uses these cookbooks to bring to life the stories and stick-to-it-iveness of the enslaved women and men who really threw down in the kitchen.

Duration:00:52:00

Black And Fine

11/9/2023
Some of America’s first maestros of European art music were enslaved and free Virginians of African descent. Violinist David McCormick shares the music of the Black violinists of Monticello from the Hemings and Scott families. Also: Justin Holland was a black man who was born free in 1819 in Norfolk County, Virginia. He became one of America's first classical guitarists and was respected by European Classical Guitar Masters. Ernie Jackson discusses Justin Holland and Jackson’s own life as a contemporary classical guitarist of African descent. Later in the show: Renowned musician JoVia Armstrong plays some of her latest works and discusses how her childhood led to her life as a musician and composer. This episode is hosted by musician and With Good Reason sound engineer Jamal Millner, who spent 20 years as a professional touring musician and composer and was a member of the Corey Harris 5x5.

Duration:00:52:00

REPLAY The Birthplace of Mac n Cheese

11/2/2023
You have Chef James Hemings, who cooked for Thomas Jefferson, to thank for the macaroni and cheese on your plate this Thanksgiving. Setting the Table's Deb Freeman tells us how the French dish became so baked into American cuisine. And: Across troubled waters, enslaved people carried benne seeds and grew them in a new land. Chef Amethyst Ganaway is snacking on benne wafers while thickening the Thanksgiving stew. Later in the show: The Lowcountry is always cooking. Chef BJ Dennis says the vast rice plantations of the Lowcountry are visible from outer space. The famed Gullah Geechee chef honors the grain with his smoky tomato purloo.

Duration:00:52:00

Dragons And Creatives

10/27/2023
Dorothy Suskind diagnoses the kind of workplace culture that allows bullying. And: Chris Reina says that prioritizing relationships creates better results in the workplace. This belief is at the center of his work at the Institute for Transformative Leadership. Later in the show: Alexandra Dunn shares how “imposter syndrome” can affect us at work. Plus: The 2020 global pandemic transformed the American workers and the American workplace Ben Biermeier-Hanson found that workers now prioritize flexibility in a job.

Duration:00:52:00

After They've Served

10/20/2023
No matter how they served or where or when, for veterans, returning to civilian life is a big transition. Eric Hodges is researching what it was like for African American veterans in his small Virginia community to return home. And: Alicia DeFonzo’s grandfather was a big part of her life as a kid. He was charming and jovial and the absolute best storyteller. But his stories always left out the years he spent fighting in WWII. Late in his life, Alicia finally asked her grandfather to tell those stories and their conversations gave rise to her new book The Time Left Between Us. Later in the show: After the Civil War, veterans and their families were able to apply for a pension. But they had to prove they were eligible. Sharon Roger Hepburn’s book Private No More compiles almost 60 letters written by John Lovejoy Murray submitted as proof for a pension and kept in his government file since the Civil War. Murray, a Black soldier who died during the war, wrote home about the food, the pay, and racism in the ranks. Plus: Community colleges can offer a particularly welcoming landing spot for veterans transitioning to civilian life. Steve Borden shares some of the ways his college is easing the transition.

Duration:00:52:00

The Age of AI

10/13/2023
After watching movies like the Terminator, it’s hard not to come away a little jaded about the future of AI. But Dan Runfola says the rise of AI will be a huge boon to society, similar to the industrial revolution of the 18th century. And: As we enter into the age of AI, where do the humanities fit in? Rishi Jaitly recently founded the Virginia Tech Institute for Leadership and Technology, a one-of-a-kind fellowship that immerses rising leaders in the tech world in all things humanities. Later in the show: Many teachers are scared about the impact AI will have on cheating. But Anand Rao says most of his students will be using AI in the workplace once they graduate. So he encourages them to use AI on assignments and coaches them on how to use it appropriately. Plus: Falling down the rabbit hole started as a reference to Alice and Wonderland. Now it's mostly used in the context of online radicalization. Ugo Etudo uses a form of AI called natural language processing to glean new insights into how people get radicalized on the internet.

Duration:00:52:00