Where We Live-logo

Where We Live

Government

Produced by Connecticut Public, 'Where We Live' puts Connecticut in context. Host Catherine Shen brings us fascinating, informed, in-depth conversations and stories beyond news headlines. We start local, but we take time to explore domestic and international issues and consider how they impact us personally and here at home.

Location:

United States

Description:

Produced by Connecticut Public, 'Where We Live' puts Connecticut in context. Host Catherine Shen brings us fascinating, informed, in-depth conversations and stories beyond news headlines. We start local, but we take time to explore domestic and international issues and consider how they impact us personally and here at home.

Twitter:

@wherewelive

Language:

English

Contact:

8602757481


Episodes

A look at efforts to address Spanish-language mis- and disinformation ahead of the 2024 election

12/7/2023
When an error was spotted in the Spanish-language instructions for the capital city’s ballot, just before the November election, officials moved to correct it. Advocates have said the error underscores the language access issues many Connecticut residents face, and the different kinds of Spanish-language mis- and disinformation there are to tackle. Former Rhode Island Secretary of State and Pell Center senior cybersecurity fellow Nellie Gorbea recently hosted a workshop for Latino elected officials in Rhode Island, Connecticut and Massachusetts, to address mis- dis- and malinformation. This hour, we discuss the layered issue of Spanish-language mis- and disinformation, and the efforts to address it. Nellie Gorbea joins us, along with UConn's Dr. Charles Venator, to discuss the important role state and local governments play, particularly as the 2024 election approaches. Plus, Madeleine Bair is the founding director of El Tímpano, a news outlet that recently trained over 100 Latino immigrants in disinformation defense. GUESTS: Dr. Charles Venator: El Instituto: Institute of Latino, Caribbean, and Latin American StudiesMadeleine Bair: El TímpanoNellie Gorbea: Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Duration:00:49:00

What it takes to save the turtles

12/5/2023
Turtles are among one of the oldest reptiles to walk the planet. Although turtles often live long lifespans and are among some of the most resilient animals on the planet, human presence has meant a huge threat to their species. In her new book Of Time and Turtles, Sy Montgomery says turtles live “slow.” She spent time working with the people who have dedicated their lives to rehabilitating these fascinating creatures, and she joins us to talk about her book. And Matt Patterson, fellow turtle lover, illustrator of this book and their accompanying picture book The Book of Turtles, joins us too. He is also a wildlife artist and sculptor. We'll learn about what’s being done to care for and protect these animals. GUESTS: Sy Montgomery: Author of Of Time and Turtles Matt Patterson: Illustrator of The Book of Turtles and wildlife artist Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode. Cat Pastor contributed to this show which originally aired October 3, 2023. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Duration:00:48:00

Mohamad Hafez installs 'Eternal Cities' at the new Yale Peabody Museum

12/4/2023
The Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History is reopening early next year after four years of renovations. Celebrated Syrian-American artist and architect Mohamad Hafez just installed a new piece, titled “Eternal Cities,” alongside the museum’s Babylonian collection. 3D-printed replicas of ancient Babylonian artifacts are peppered throughout the piece, bridging the millennia between ancient Mesopotamia and present-day Syria. "It's a collaboration between educational archaeological museums, and local artists that come from the region that are working and living in the diaspora," says Hafez, "and at the crux of it, it solves a problem of engaging people in a very short attention span times, getting more interest built into these objects beyond just looking at them in a glass vitrine." This hour, Mohamad joins us along with two of the museum’s curators. The new Peabody aims to position itself as a more community-centered space in New Haven. How can museums include the local communities they serve? GUESTS: Mohamad Hafez: Artist and Architect Kailen Rogers: Associate Director of Exhibitions, Yale Peabody Museum Agnete Lassen: Associate Curator, Yale Babylonian Collection Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Duration:00:50:00

Finding solutions to reduce holiday waste

12/1/2023
The holiday season is a time we all want to enjoy. Maybe that means indulging in more food than usual, buying those special gifts and treats for loved ones, and going all out with decorations in your home. But with all that indulgence, comes a lot of waste. At the end of the holiday season, an additional 1 million tons of trash enter landfills. According to Stanford University's Waste Reduction, Recycling, Composting and Solid Waste Program, household waste increases by more than 25% from Thanksgiving to New Year’s. This comes from various sources including wrapping paper, Christmas trees and even food waste. But experts say there are easy ways to reduce your carbon footprint and have a greener holiday season. Today, we talk about ways to reduce holiday waste. GUESTS: Miriah Kelly: Brittney Cavalliere: Connecticut Food Share, a food bank based in Bloomfield and BridgeportYasmine Ugurlu: Reboot Eco, a zero waste shop in Middletown Connecticut Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Duration:00:49:00

Rewriting the Thanksgiving story, while centering Indigenous voices

11/30/2023
From the Mayflower's landing, to the meal shared by English setters and Wampanoag people, much is still widely misunderstood about the Thanksgiving holiday and its history. Connecticut-based educator Chris Newell recently wrote a book for children that helps to untangle some of the myths and misnomers commonly associated with Thanksgiving. For example, the book clarifies that "the holiday we celebrate today does not have any real connection to the Mayflower’s landing. In fact, the story that links them was not created until two hundred years later." As Newell notes in his introduction, "The story of the Mayflower landing is different depending on whether the storyteller viewed the events from the boat or from the shore." This hour, Chris Newell joins us. Plus, how is this topic being reframed in Connecticut classrooms? The Connecticut State Department of Education recently published resources for "Teaching Native American Studies." The materials were developed in a collaboration between the five state-recognized Eastern Woodland tribes: Golden Hill Paugussett, Mashantucket Pequot, Mohegan, Paucatuck Eastern Pequot and Schaghticoke. Becky Gomez, the director of education for the Mashantucket Pequot Tribal Nation, and Sam Tondreau, a member of the Mohegan Tribe as well as their director of curriculum and instruction, discuss. GUESTS: Chris Newell: Akowmawt Educational InitiativeIf You Lived DuringRebecca Gomez: Samantha Tondreau: Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Duration:00:49:00

Why you should give a hoot about owls

11/28/2023
Every winter in Connecticut, the snowy owls will pass through our state and can sometimes be spotted at the Connecticut shoreline. But they are just one of many owl species to look out for where we live. Some cultures see owls as deeply spiritual creatures and as symbols of wisdom. Others see them as bad omens and as signs of impending doom.And that’s definitely impacting their populations. Today, Author Jennifer Ackerman joins us to talk about her new book What the Owl Knows: The new science of the world’s most enigmatic birds and we explore the world of these incredible birds. GUEST: Jennifer Ackerman: What the Owl Knows: The new science of the world’s most enigmatic birdsSupport the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Duration:00:38:56

Examining the history and legacy of 'sundown towns' in Connecticut

11/27/2023
For decades, there were cities and towns that were all-white on purpose. These communities are known as "sundown towns." Because this practice was both formal and informal, researchers put together a database of these laws, customs and firsthand accounts, under the leadership of the late sociologist and civil rights champion James Loewen. At the peak of the exclusionary practice in 1970, an estimated 10,000 communities across the U.S. kept out African-Americans through "force, law, or custom." Many sundown suburbs also excluded Jewish and Chinese Americans, and other minority groups. There are 40 towns listed as possible past sundown towns in Connecticut. This hour, we hear about this history and what it can tell us. You can add to this research too. GUESTS: Dr. Stephen Berrey:Logan Jaffe: Paul Saubestre: Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Duration:00:49:00

Addressing misconceptions around food insecurity: 'It's about more than food'

11/21/2023
For a Connecticut family of four, it costs over $126,000 just to meet their basic needs, according to a recent United Way report. That’s more than four times the federal poverty level. Food insecurity is a big part of the problem, affecting more than 1 in 10 Connecticut residents, according to Connecticut Foodshare. A new report from the United States Department of Agriculture found the national rate of food insecurity jumped by more than 2% from 2021 to 2022, now 12.8% of U.S. households. This hour, UConn's Dr. Caitlin Caspi joins us to address some of the misconceptions around food insecurity. "Food insecurity isn't happening in a vacuum," she says. "It's really intersecting with a lot of other challenges that people face," including stable housing, health insurance, job security, disability, and other factors. "Food insecurity isn't primarily a story about food," says Dr. Caspi. "It's about many facets of economic instability." Plus, we'll discuss some of Connecticut Foodshare’s efforts to address food insecurity where we live, including an income-based grocery store coming soon to Hartford, where food insecurity rates are highest in the state. Hartford High School just launched the Grub Pub, an in-school pantry. Principal Flora Padro joins us later in the hour, describing the "new normal" she envisions. GUESTS: Dr. Caitlin Caspi: Associate Professor, University of Connecticut's Department of Allied Health Sciences; Director of Food Security Initiatives, Rudd Center for Food Policy and Health Jason Jakubowski: President & CEO, Connecticut Foodshare Ben Dubow: Executive Director, Forge City Works Flora Padro: Principal, Hartford High School Cat Pastor contributed to this episode which originally aired October 26, 2023. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Duration:00:48:00

'What's eating at America': Addressing the loneliness and isolation epidemic

11/20/2023
Approximately half of U.S. adults reported experiencing loneliness, even prior to the COVID-19 pandemic. The issue recently moved U.S. Surgeon General Vivek Murthy to issue an advisory around the "loneliness epidemic" in America. Soon after, Connecticut Senator Chris Murphy introduced a bill that would launch an Office of Social Connection Policy, and fund CDC research to "better understand the epidemic of social isolation and loneliness." While on The Colin McEnroe Show in July, Murphy said the move was "part of a broader exploration for me of what is eating in America... I have come to the conclusion that there's a lot of new and unique things that are hurting Americans and making them feel unhappy today," chief among them loneliness or "aloneness." This hour, we explore how loneliness, isolation and social disconnection are being addressed where we live. Deb Bibbins and Gary Sekorski founded For All Ages, and more recently, the Connecticut Collaborative to End Loneliness, to help bolster and centralize resources. How does loneliness or isolation affect you? GUESTS: Deb Bibbins: Co-Founder and Chair, For All Ages; Co-Founder, Connecticut Collaborative to End Loneliness Gary Sekorski: Co-Founder and Chair, For All Ages; Co-Founder, Connecticut Collaborative to End Loneliness Connie Malone: Canton Resident Siri Palreddy: Senior at Amherst College Dr. Sowmya Kurtakoti: Chief of Geriatric Medicine, Hartford Hospital Cat Pastor contributed to this episode which originally aired September 18, 2023. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Duration:00:47:31

A look at college enrollment decline

11/17/2023
Declining college enrollment has opened up a bigger conversation about the value of a college degree. From 2010 to 2021, undergraduate enrollment dropped by 15%. This declining trend in college enrollment was magnified by the pandemic, when perceptions of the value of a degree really began to shift. The decision making process for potential college students has become more personalized. Potential students have access to alternative pathways, and the ones that do go to college have needs that aren’t often met by the current model of college education. High costs, conflicting work schedules, and concerns ROI are barriers that affect a person's decision. This shift away from degree requirements, restarting financial aid payments in October 2023, and the social conversations about college undoubtedly cause us to wonder who should go to college. Today, we talk about the college conversation. GUESTS: Steve Schneider: High School Counselor at Sheboygan South High School in Sheboygan, Wisconsin Katharine Meyer: a Fellow in Governance Studies and Higher Education Researcher at the Brookings Institution. Courtney Brown: Vice President of Impact and Planning at Lumina Foundation Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode. Connecticut Public Talk Show Intern Joey Morgan produced this broadcast. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Duration:00:48:58

Healing and humanizing through artifact: Visiting the Museum of Jewish Civilization

11/16/2023
How do museums act as places of discovery, dialogue, and healing? These spaces engage with critical, often complex, issues important to the communities they serve. For two weeks, we're spotlighting two museums where we live doing just that, and speaking with Dr. Macushla Robinson about the power of art and curation. Last week, we took a tour of Palestine Museum US in Woodbridge. It’s the first museum in the country centering Palestinian arts and culture, with a mission of humanizing Palestinian people. This hour, we’ll spend time at the Museum of Jewish Civilization at the University of Hartford, a teaching museum where artifacts and photography help center Jewish history and culture. Amy Weiss, the museum's director, explains that personal narratives help tell the complex history of American Jews, a group that is not monolithic. "The overarching message is the importance of democracy and the fight against fascism," she says. What role do museums play in your community? GUESTS: Dr. Macushla Robinson: Amy Weiss: Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Duration:00:49:00

Think of it as a tool: Artificial Intelligence in education

11/14/2023
There have been a lot of things that have revolutionized how educators teach in the classrooms. Things like Wikipedia, Google and even calculators have caused temporary panic in the education space. Now that ChatGPT and other artificial intelligence tools are becoming a central part of our everyday lives, some educators are scrambling to rethink their curriculum. If you ask the artificial intelligence app, ChatGPT, to write you a 500 page essay on the themes in Moby Dick, in a matter of seconds, you’ll have a well written paper. Even further, you can even tell ChatGPT “write me a 500 word essay on the themes of Moby Dick, in the voice of a 10th grader” and the essay will reflect the tone and language of the average 15 year old. When ChatGPT was first released, we took a deep dive into AI ethics and learned how it might education. And today, we get an update and we talk to teachers around the state and hear how they are actually utilizing AI in the classroom. GUESTS: Jeff Young: Editor of EdSurge, an education journalism initiative Tom Deans: Professor of English and Director of the University Writing Center at the University of Connecticut Erica Strong: Literacy Coach at Lebanon Middle School John Allen: Social Studies Teacher at Putnam High School Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode. Cat Pastor contributed to this show which originally aired September 15, 2023. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Duration:00:47:00

'Think like a historian': State approves new social studies standards

11/13/2023
Social studies education in Connecticut public schools has been getting a major revamp. It’s something we’ve covered on this program. This includes the statute requiring local Indigenous history that rolled out this year, and a statute in 2022 calling for Asian American and Pacific Islander studies, rolling out in the fall of 2025. The state legislature combined many of these mandates in 2021, calling for a "model curriculum." This curriculum should include Native American studies and AAPI studies, the bill stated, in addition to LGBTQ studies, climate change, financial literacy, military service and veterans, civics, media literacy, the principles of social-emotional learning, and racism. It was a long list and a tall order, and prompted the Connecticut State Department of Education to gather a group of experts on all of these fronts, and construct a new set of social studies standards. This hour, we hear from some of them and preview that document. GUESTS: Steve Armstrong: Social Studies Advisor, Connecticut State Department of Education; Past President, National Council for the Social Studies Tony Roy: President, Connecticut Council for the Social Studies; Social Studies Teacher, Bloomfield Public Schools Dr. Brittney Yancy: Assistant Professor of History and African American Studies, Illinois College Dr. Michael Bartone: Assistant Professor, Central Connecticut State University's Department of Literacy, Elementary, and Early Childhood Education Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Duration:00:49:00

The trauma of witnessing war, near and far

11/10/2023
It has been just over one month since the Israel-Hamas war began, resulting in the deaths of thousands of civilians and a worsening humanitarian crisis in Gaza. The images and reports coming out of this region are dire. Many have been left traumatized from witnessing the atrocities of this war up close and from afar Some experts say this war alone will create a generation in trauma. That’s on top of the trauma that’s already been experienced by children in the region. Children impacted by trauma can experience long term side effects and regression in their development. Humanitarians are not just addressing the physical needs, providing food, water, medical care and shelter, but themental health needs of the children experiencing acute traumatic stress. Experts say addressing the mental health needs in this region will require a long term strategy and the time to address mental health needs is now. When a disaster of this scale happens, it can impact a lot of people — and not just those directly affected. Secondary trauma can occur simply by hearing about someone else’s trauma. People working with these traumatized populations are at high risk for this type of trauma, as are those of us a world away. Doom-scrolling can cause numerous negative mental health outcomes and symptoms of secondary trauma including compassion fatigue. This can be exacerbated for those that have ties to the region. What's happening now in Israel and Gaza can be a constant reminder of atrocities that have impacted generations of peoples. For both Israelis and Palestinians, collective trauma, and in some cases, intergenerational traumamakes breaking the cycles of violence even harder. Trauma has layers. Trauma is complicated. And trauma ripples. In today’s show, we’re examining all the layers of trauma. If you need to talk to someone, you can call SAMHSA’s National Helpline at 1-800-662-HELP (4357). It’s free, confidential and available 24/7. GUESTS: Dr. Julian Ford: Rabbi Debra Cantor:Congresgation B’nai Tikvoh-Sholom SynagogueSteve Sosebee: Palestine Children’s Relief FundDr. Taline Andonian:Resonance Center for Psychotherapy & Healing ArtsSupport the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Duration:00:49:00

Healing and humanizing through art: Visiting Palestine Museum US in Woodbridge

11/9/2023
How do museums act as places of discovery, dialogue, and healing? These spaces engage with critical, often complex, issues important to the communities they serve. This includes, for some, the current war between Israel and Hamas, and the resulting humanitarian crisis in Gaza. This week and next, we’re going to bring you to two museums to explore that question, and speak with Dr. Macushla Robinson about the power of art and curation. Next week, we’ll spend time at the Museum of Jewish Civilization at the University of Hartford, a teaching museum working to tell the stories of Jewish people and how they lived. This hour, we take a tour of Palestine Museum US in Woodbridge. It’s the first museum in the country centering Palestinian arts and culture, with a mission of humanizing Palestinian people. Hear from the museum's founder and executive director, Faisal Saleh. "Art speaks to the heart, politics speak to the mind," says Saleh. "You don't need to translate anything, because it's a universal language of the art." What role do museums play in your community? GUESTS: Dr. Macushla Robinson: Faisal Saleh:Palestine Museum USSupport the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Duration:00:49:00

The influential role of student government, youth voting and Beardsley Zoo's animal mayoral race

11/7/2023
This year, we’ve been learning about how educators are getting students engaged in the electoral process. One way to do this: student government. When you think of class elections, a couple things probably come to mind. But our guests says student government is much more than prom committees and candidate speeches in the cafeteria. We'll learn more about the influence student representatives have on their school districts. Later, Connecticut’s Beardsley Zoo is holding their forth mayoral race. There are five candidates running this year for mayor. We’ll hear about the animal candidates and how you can vote for your favorite. We'll also hear how students on college campuses throughout our state are organizing to turn out the vote. GUESTS: Christopher H. Tomlin:Connecticut Association of Student CouncilsKevin Brown: Connecticut State Representative for Vernon, ConnecticutJennifer Croughwell:Connecticut College DemocratsNick Schettino: Gregg Dancho: Connecticut’s Beardsley Zoo Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Duration:00:49:00

Examining links between climate distress and climate action

11/6/2023
The Yale Program on Climate Change Communication found that the majority of Americans are either "alarmed" or "concerned" about climate change. They also discovered links between distress about climate change and a desire to take action. This hour, Dr. Anthony Leiserowitz digs into this study, and the Six Americas Super Short Survey (SASSY). You can take the SASSY Survey here. Plus, NBC Connecticut meteorologist Rachael Jay and New Haven Climate Movement organizer Adrian Huq will share their perspectives as different kinds of climate communicators. How do you process feelings of alarm or distress around climate change, or even, take action? GUESTS: Rachael Jay:Dr. Anthony Leiserowitz:Yale Program on Climate Change CommunicationAdrian Huq:New Haven Climate Movement Cat Pastor contributed to this episode which originally aired September 11, 2023. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Duration:00:49:00

Humanitarian aid organizations address the crisis in Gaza and Israel

11/3/2023
As the war continues in Israel and Gaza, humanitarians are working to deliver aid across the region. Humanitarian aid starts with addressing the basic necessities; food, water, and emergency medical care. And later, addressing mental health needs and the survived trauma of the millions displaced. This week, some Connecticut lawmakers called for a humanitarian pausewhich could allow more aid into Gaza. Children are nearly half of Gaza’s population. In the past three weeks, more children have been killed there than the total killed in conflicts globally in every year since 2019. That’s according to Save the Children, an international NGO and humanitarian aid organization based in Connecticut. Today, we hear from two aid organizations based in Connecticut. We learn more about addressing this enormous need, and what the work on the ground looks like. GUESTS: Nathaniel Raymond: Humanitarian Research Lab at the Yale School of Public HealthChristine Squires: AmericaresJanti Soeripto: Save the Children Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Duration:00:49:00

CT-based Gen Z trailblazers: Musician ericdoa, K-pop dance crew SEOULAR, and designer MINIPNG

11/2/2023
This hour, we're focusing on Gen Z's impact on arts and culture. Eric George Lopez, or ericdoa, has been described as the "face of hyperpop," a newer music genre born out of 2000s electronic music. But in many ways, the "genre-bending" up-and-coming artist defies categorization. He discusses his upbringing in Connecticut, how he developed his sound and what makes Gen Z uniquely powerful in the arts. Later in the hour, we spotlight SEOULAR, a K-pop dance crew at University of Connecticut, part of KCONN, the campus' K-pop club. KCONN President Gina Tran and Vice President Alan Tran join us. Plus, Eiress Hammond is the owner of MINIPNG, a New Haven business featuring her designs in addition to up-and-coming creators. She joins us to discuss her mission of "sustainability and individuality." How is Gen Z shifting boundaries or influencing arts and culture where you live? GUESTS: ericdoa: Gina Tran:KCONNAlan Tran:Eiress Hammond:MINIPNG Connecticut Public intern Lateshia Peters also contributed to this episode. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Duration:00:49:00

Witches and Mombies! Happy Halloween from Where We Live

10/31/2023
Being a Mom on Halloween can be pretty hectic, but a group of Fairfield Moms are taking the spooky season by storm. They're dressing up as zombies and taking the town in their infamous flash mobs. The “Mombies” is a group of Moms of all ages that have been coordinating to “dance to donate” since 2016. They have raised over $170,000 for breast cancer research to date - and their dance videos have been seen by millions. Throughout October, these Moms are putting on their Zombie finest attire and are participating in epic dance performances across the state. We hear from two of the mombies today. Later, the Connecticut witch trials is one of our favorite topics to dive into here on Where We Live. But did you ever wonder what started all the panic around witches? In the Trinity College Rare Book collection, you can see some of the first illustrations and books about witches.We'll learn more about these texts and how influential they became throughout Connecticut and the rest of New England. GUESTS: Marney White: Sheryl KraftEric Johnson-DeBaufre, PhD, MLIS: Emma Greig Ph.D: Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Duration:00:49:00