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Where We Live

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Produced by Connecticut Public, 'Where We Live' puts Connecticut in context. Host Catherine Shen brings us fascinating, informed, in-depth conversations and stories beyond news headlines. We start local, but we take time to explore domestic and international issues and consider how they impact us personally and here at home.

Location:

United States

Description:

Produced by Connecticut Public, 'Where We Live' puts Connecticut in context. Host Catherine Shen brings us fascinating, informed, in-depth conversations and stories beyond news headlines. We start local, but we take time to explore domestic and international issues and consider how they impact us personally and here at home.

Twitter:

@wherewelive

Language:

English

Contact:

8602757481


Episodes

Addressing misconceptions around food insecurity: 'It's about more than food'

2/20/2024
For a Connecticut family of four, it costs over $126,000 just to meet their basic needs, according to a recent United Way report. That’s more than four times the federal poverty level. Food insecurity is a big part of the problem, affecting more than 1 in 10 Connecticut residents, according to Connecticut Foodshare. A new report from the United States Department of Agriculture found the national rate of food insecurity jumped by more than 2% from 2021 to 2022, now 12.8% of U.S. households. This hour, UConn's Dr. Caitlin Caspi joins us to address some of the misconceptions around food insecurity. "Food insecurity isn't happening in a vacuum," she says. "It's really intersecting with a lot of other challenges that people face," including stable housing, health insurance, job security, disability, and other factors. "Food insecurity isn't primarily a story about food," says Dr. Caspi. "It's about many facets of economic instability." Plus, we'll discuss some of Connecticut Foodshare’s efforts to address food insecurity where we live, including an income-based grocery store coming soon to Hartford, where food insecurity rates are highest in the state. Hartford High School just launched the Grub Pub, an in-school pantry. Principal Flora Padro joins us later in the hour, describing the "new normal" she envisions. GUESTS: Dr. Caitlin Caspi: Associate Professor, University of Connecticut's Department of Allied Health Sciences; Director of Food Security Initiatives, Rudd Center for Food Policy and Health Jason Jakubowski: President & CEO, Connecticut Foodshare Ben Dubow: Executive Director, Forge City Works Flora Padro: Principal, Hartford High School Cat Pastor contributed to this episode which originally aired October 26, 2023. Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Duration:00:48:00

Love has no age: Dating as an older adult

2/16/2024
Dating in 2024 can be tough. There are no shortage of stories about dating in the age of Tinder, Bumble, Hinge, and more! But today, we're going to talk about dating, and falling in love, when you're an older adult. Last fall, the spinoff show “The Golden Bachelor” started a national conversation about falling in love in midlife and beyond. Today we hear from experts about dating in this age range, and we’ll even get to hear some love stories that will put "The Notebook" to shame. And if you are dating or have fallen in love, at any age, we want to hear from you! GUESTS: Dr. Kristina Zdanys: Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Division Chief for Geriatric Psychiatry and Behavioral Health at UConn Health Chip Conley: Founder & CEO of the Modern Elder Academy Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Duration:00:49:18

Connecticut disability advocates push for legislation to improve medical access

2/15/2024
Disability rights advocates in Connecticut are demanding better medical access. And this legislative session, they’re pushing lawmakers to pass two bills. Both aim to improve medical equipment and training, and access to better care when examining, diagnosing and treating patients with disabilities. We hear from one advocacy group involved in this effort, the Citizens Coalition for Equal Access, or CC=A. Public Health Committee Co-Chair and State Sen. Saud Anwar also shares his hopes for the pair of bills — one focused on medical diagnostic equipment, the other on lifts — which he helped to draft after an informational hearing with disability rights advocates across Connecticut last September. Where We Live heard from eight members of CC=A prior to this program, who talked about some of their negative experiences in the medical setting. As Jamie Mosier shared, "Something has to be passed to make sure we get what I need, that we get what everybody needs, before we're all dead." Plus later today, wheelchair users and advocates across the state will gather at the State Capitol. They plan to rally in support of the "transformational recommendations by the legislative Wheelchair Repair Task Force to tackle the absurd delays faced by 90% of roughly 5,000 CT consumers." Task Force member and consumer advocate Jonathan Sigworth joins us to discuss this legislative push. GUESTS: Dr. Cindy Miller: Ruth Grobe: Jonathan Sigworth: Carly Malesky:Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Duration:00:49:00

E.R. Murrow Podcast Submission: Where We Live "Amazon responds to proposed bill aimed at warehouse 'quotas'"

2/13/2024
A 2023 bill sought to set limits on how warehouses track worker productivity in Connecticut. Though it didn’t name a company, Amazon was the primary focus of an initial hearing. Statistics found Amazon had higher-than-average worker injury rates. The company, with 14 facilities and more than 15,000 employees in the state, had yet to respond to the legislation before this program. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Duration:00:28:55

E.R. Murrow Podcast Submission: The trauma of witnessing war, near and far

2/13/2024
Experts say that the Israel-Hamas war alone will create a generation of trauma. For both Israelis and Palestinians, collective trauma, and in some cases, intergenerational trauma, makes breaking the cycles of violence even harder. When a disaster of this scale happens, it can impact a lot of people — not just those directly affected. In this program, we spoke with a humanitarian, a Rabbi and a psychologist. What we learned was that trauma is complicated, trauma has layers, and trauma ripples. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Duration:00:20:26

'What's eating at America': Addressing the loneliness and isolation epidemic

2/13/2024
Approximately half of U.S. adults reported experiencing loneliness, even prior to the COVID-19 pandemic. The issue recently moved U.S. Surgeon General Vivek Murthy to issue an advisory around the "loneliness epidemic" in America. Soon after, Connecticut Senator Chris Murphy introduced a bill that would launch an Office of Social Connection Policy, and fund CDC research to "better understand the epidemic of social isolation and loneliness." While on The Colin McEnroe Show in July, Murphy said the move was "part of a broader exploration for me of what is eating in America... I have come to the conclusion that there's a lot of new and unique things that are hurting Americans and making them feel unhappy today," chief among them loneliness or "aloneness." This hour, we explore how loneliness, isolation and social disconnection are being addressed where we live. Deb Bibbins and Gary Sekorski founded For All Ages, and more recently, the Connecticut Collaborative to End Loneliness, to help bolster and centralize resources. How does loneliness or isolation affect you? GUESTS: Deb Bibbins: Co-Founder and Chair, For All Ages; Co-Founder, Connecticut Collaborative to End Loneliness Gary Sekorski: Co-Founder and Chair, For All Ages; Co-Founder, Connecticut Collaborative to End Loneliness Connie Malone: Canton Resident Siri Palreddy: Senior at Amherst College Dr. Sowmya Kurtakoti: Chief of Geriatric Medicine, Hartford Hospital Cat Pastor contributed to this episode which originally aired September 18, 2023. Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Duration:00:47:31

The 'wild rumpus' continues: Maurice Sendak's legacy lives on at Ridgefield Foundation

2/12/2024
Maurice Sendak is often celebrated for his contributions to children’s book art. You’re likely familiar with Where The Wild Things Are, or even Higglety Pigglety Pop. But in the late artist’s own words, "I do not believe that I have ever written a children's book. I do not know how to write a children’s book. How do you set out to write a children’s book?" This hour, we’re exploring the Maurice Sendak Foundation in Ridgefield, where Sendak lived for more than forty years. There, the many layers of his artistic legacy live on with the help of the experts and friends who knew and loved him best. We hear from them. Twelve years after the artist's passing, the Foundation and HarperCollins are releasing Ten Little Rabbits GUESTS: Lynn Caponera: President and Treasurer, Maurice Sendak Foundation Dr. Jonathan Weinberg: Curator, Maurice Sendak Foundation Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Duration:01:02:38

A conversation with Clarence B. Jones

2/9/2024
February is Black History Month. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr’s birthday was in January. Around this time, we often see his quotes circulate on social media. And we also hear about his legacy as an activist and a minister, and his fight for civil rights in the U.S. Today, we’re going to listen back to a recent interview with Clarence B. Jones. Clarence B. Jones was one of the many giants of the civil rights movement. He served as personal counsel to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. He was also his speech writer and personal friend. John Henry Smith spoke with him earlier this year about his work in the civil rights movement and we’ll hear about his thoughts of where civil rights is today. GUESTS Clarence B. Jones: John Henry Smith: Rev. Dr. Stephen G. Ray Jr: United Church on the Green Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Duration:00:49:00

Examining the history and legacy of 'sundown towns' in Connecticut

2/8/2024
For decades, there were cities and towns that were all-white on purpose. These communities are known as "sundown towns." Because this practice was both formal and informal, researchers put together a database of these laws, customs and firsthand accounts, under the leadership of the late sociologist and civil rights champion James Loewen. At the peak of the exclusionary practice in 1970, an estimated 10,000 communities across the U.S. kept out African-Americans through "force, law, or custom." Many sundown suburbs also excluded Jewish and Chinese Americans, and other minority groups. There are 40 towns listed as possible or probable past sundown towns in Connecticut. This hour, we hear about this history and what it can tell us. You can add to this research too. GUESTS: Dr. Stephen Berrey: Assistant Professor of American Culture and History, University of Michigan Logan Jaffe: Reporter, ProPublica Paul Saubestre: Volunteer Researcher, Hamden Historical Society Cat Pastor contributed to this episode which originally aired November 27, 2023. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Duration:00:48:30

How the artist captures climate change

2/6/2024
Around the globe, artists are using their mediums to show how climate change is impacting our planet. Today, we’re exploring the convergence of art and science. We'll be talking with artists using their craft to have conversations about the environment. Earlier this year, Where We Live talked about how snow loss is impacting our ecosystems and community here in Connecticut. Today, we hear from Lynn Cazabon, the artist behind the multidisciplinary project “Losing Winter” who will join us from Australia. But first up, we’re hearing from the Mattatuck Museum. The exhibit “Sea Change | See Change” is raising awareness of how climate change is impacting our oceans. GUESTS: Sam Schwann:Keffie Feldman:Mattatuck MuseumLynn Cazabon:Losing WinterElizabeth Ellenwood: Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Duration:00:49:00

Pet shelters in the state still flooded with requests to surrender animals

2/5/2024
In 2023, more than 6 million animals entered shelters and rescues in the U.S., according to a recent report from Shelter Animals Count. Believe it or not, those numbers are down from pre-pandemic reports. Over the summer, Connecticut news outlets reported that animal shelters in our state were "bursting at the seams," and unable to keep up with calls from people trying to surrender pets. This hour, we’ll be checking back in with some of those pet shelters. How is the so-called "pandemic boomerang" affecting them now? Plus, we’ll switch gears and talk to farm animal and wildlife rescues in Connecticut. Whether you’ve got questions about your pandemic puppy, or a stray opossum you think might need some help, join the conversation. GUESTS: Laura Burban: Dan Cosgrove Animal ShelterMarla C Riley:The Riley Farm RescuePamela A. Lefferts: Ferncroft Wildlife Rescue Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Duration:00:49:00

Connecticut's "Aerospace Alley" celebrates the state's aviation past and future

2/2/2024
Throughout history, our state has made some big contributions to aviation technology. Today, we’re talking about the history and future of aviation in our state. We hear from some aviation enthusiasts who’s love of all things plane is going to make you soar. The New England Air Museum houses some unbelievable vintage aircrafts. We hear from them. And we hear from someone with experience flying in some of these vintage aircrafts. If flying in a vintage plane is not your speed, there are more ways you can tap into your inner pilot. There are many model plane clubs here in all four corners of Connecticut. We learn how you can get involved. If you're an aviation enthusiast, we want to hear from you! GUESTS: Stephanie Abrams:Mike Thornton:Edward Deming:RC Propbusters of Salem, CTBob Creter:D-Day Squadron in Oxford, Connecticut Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Duration:00:41:08

Taking a 'holistic approach' to treating congenital heart disease

2/1/2024
Heart disease has been the leading cause of death in the United States for decades, putting much of the focus squarely and rightly on cardiovascular disease. But what about congenital heart conditions, something affecting your heart since birth? There are 13 million adults living with congenital heart disease, and that number has grown as treatments advance; survival rates have improved by 75% since the 1940s. But those diagnoses can come later in life, and even with sure signs, the need for specialized, lifelong care is often unmet. This hour, we're joined by the co-authors of Healing Hearts and Minds: A holistic approach to coping well with congenital heart disease. Plus, we hear from one of 50 clinics accredited by the Adult Congenital Heart Association in the U.S., right here in Connecticut. GUESTS: Tracy Livecchi: Social Worker; Co-Author, Healing Hearts and Minds: A holistic approach to coping well with congenital heart disease Dr. Liza Morton: Psychologist; Co-Author, Healing Hearts and Minds Dr. Robert Elder: Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Cardiology) and Internal Medicine (Cardiology); Director, Adult Congenital Heart Program; Director Pediatric Cardiology Fellowship Program, Pediatric Cardiology Cat Pastor contributed to this program which originally aired October 11. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Duration:00:39:30

Fewer Americans are considering careers in the military and branches are looking for solutions to recruiting

1/30/2024
During the last fiscal year, the army alone missed their recruiting goal by 25%. All branches of the military are struggling to recruit new cadets. With an all-volunteer service, the military relies on recruitment efforts to get more people to serve. But fewer Americans than ever are eligible to do so. And attracting the next generation of cadets has been a challenge. Today, we talk about the military recruiting crisis. We will hear from Captain Benjamin Keffer, Commanding Officer of Coast Guard Recruiting Command. Later, we hear how some extremist groups are working to get veterans and others with tactical experience into their organizations. GUESTS: Dr. Nora Bensahel: Professor of the Practice at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies and a Contributing Editor, War on the Rocks Captain Benjamin Keffer: Commanding Officer of Coast Guard Recruiting Command Sonner Kehrt: Investigative Reporter at the War Horse and Coast Guard Veteran Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode. Cat Pastor contributed to this show which originally aired on October 6, 2023. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Duration:00:41:00

Yehyun Kim’s ‘A Diaspora in Focus’ puts a lens on Connecticut residents with Asian roots

1/29/2024
This hour, photo and video journalist Yehyun Kim joins us to discuss A Diaspora in Focus, a three-part project she launched for the Connecticut Mirror in 2023. The project was in response to landmark legislation passed in the state that will require public schools to offer Asian American and Pacific Islander, or AAPI, history. Yehyun interviewed and photographed one resident from each of the 21 Asian ethnicities as defined by the U.S. Census Bureau, and this included our very own Catherine Shen. This hour, she joins us to discuss this moving series for the Connecticut Mirror. As Yehyun explained, "It would be impossible for any single project to capture the totality of the Asian American experience in the state. But, when woven together, the lives of the people represented here provide a glimpse into the richness and diversity of Connecticut’s Asian residents." Jenny Heikkila Díaz, or JHD, also joins us, to discuss their role in the photo project, as well as the state's AAPI curriculum development. GUESTS: Yehyun Kim:Jennifer Heikkila Díaz (JHD): Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Duration:00:49:00

A conversation with Palestinian journalist Plestia Alaqad

1/26/2024
As journalists, it’s been challenging for us to watch what is happening to our fellow members of the press in Gaza. 83 journalist casualties have occurred in this region. The blue press vest and helmet is a heavy weight to carry, for so many still trying to report what’s happening. This week, we spoke with Plestia Alaqad. She is a 22 year old journalist from Gaza. She recently made the difficult decision to leave the region. This week, Where We Live spoke to her about her experience. GUESTS: Plestia Alaqad: Lila Hassan: Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Duration:00:49:00

A conversation with Palestinian journalist Plestia Alaqad

1/26/2024
As journalists, it’s been challenging for us to watch what is happening to our fellow members of the press in Gaza. 83 journalist casualties have occurred in this region. The blue press vest and helmet is a heavy weight to carry, for so many still trying to report what’s happening. This week, we spoke with Plestia Alaqad. She is a 22 year old journalist from Gaza. She recently made the difficult decision to leave the region. This week, Where We Live spoke to her about her experience. GUESTS: Plestia Alaqad: Lila Hassan: Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Duration:00:49:00

Connecticut is the land of steady habits, but no steady identity

1/25/2024
Tri-state area or New England? Nutmeg or Constitution State? "Stuffy, preppy, sleepy"? What really makes Connecticut Connecticut, and what stereotypes can we stand to shake off? After the state's recent rebranding effort, it's a debate that has found its way to the national stage. This hour, Catherine Shen is joined by a roundtable of Connecticut Public hosts, as we debate what defines Connecticut. And we want to hear from you. What characterizes or typifies where you live? What do you think people get wrong or right about Connecticut's reputation? GUESTS: Colin McEnroe:The Colin McEnroe ShowChion Wolf: Audacious with Chion WolfDr. Khalilah Brown-Dean: DisruptedDr. Jonathan Wharton: Associate Professor of Political Science and Urban AffairsCT News Junkie Find more about the show here: Where We Live Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Duration:00:49:00

Connecticut is the land of steady habits, but no steady identity

1/25/2024
Tri-state area or New England? Nutmeg or Constitution State? "Stuffy, preppy, sleepy"? What really makes Connecticut Connecticut, and what stereotypes can we stand to shake off? After the state's recent rebranding effort, it's a debate that has found its way to the national stage. This hour, Catherine Shen is joined by a roundtable of Connecticut Public hosts, as we debate what defines Connecticut. And we want to hear from you. What characterizes or typifies where you live? What do you think people get wrong or right about Connecticut's reputation? GUESTS: Colin McEnroe:The Colin McEnroe ShowChion Wolf: Audacious with Chion WolfDr. Khalilah Brown-Dean: DisruptedDr. Jonathan Wharton: Associate Professor of Political Science and Urban AffairsCT News Junkie Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Duration:00:49:00

When snow goes away...

1/23/2024
Depending on where you live,warmer winters could mean less and less snow. In some places, it’s only one or two degrees that could make a difference. Joining us today are two scientists looking at the data around snow in our region and beyond to start to calculate how much snow loss is impacting us, and what it means for our environment. Less snow can mean a lot of things, including a big impact on winter sports. We also hear from a local ski resort. And later, we learn about solastalgia. GUESTS: Laura Loffredo: Powder Ridge Mountain Park & ResortAlex Gottlieb:Justin Mankin:Dr. Karen Steinberg Gallucci, Ph.D. Where We Live is available as a podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, TuneIn, Listen Notes, or wherever you get your podcasts. Subscribe and never miss an episode. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Duration:00:49:00