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All Of It

Interviews

ALL OF IT is a show about culture and its consumers. ALL OF IT is a show about culture and context. ALL OF IT is a show about culture and the culture. Our aim is to engage the thinkers, doers, makers, and creators, about the what and why of their work. People make the culture and we hope, need, and want the WNYC community to be a part of our show. As we build a community around ALL OF IT, we know that every guest and listener has an opinion. We won’t always agree, but our varied perspectives and diversity of experience is what makes New York City great. ALL OF IT will be both companion for and curator of the myriad culture this city has to offer. In the words of Cristina De Rossi, anthropologist at Barnet and Southgate College, London: "Culture encompasses religion, food, what we wear, how we wear it, our language, marriage, music, what we believe is right or wrong, how we sit at the table, how we greet visitors, how we behave with loved ones, and a million other things." ...In other words, ALL OF IT. --- Join us for ALL OF IT with Alison Stewart, weekdays from 12:00 - 2:00PM on WNYC.

Location:

New York, NY

Description:

ALL OF IT is a show about culture and its consumers. ALL OF IT is a show about culture and context. ALL OF IT is a show about culture and the culture. Our aim is to engage the thinkers, doers, makers, and creators, about the what and why of their work. People make the culture and we hope, need, and want the WNYC community to be a part of our show. As we build a community around ALL OF IT, we know that every guest and listener has an opinion. We won’t always agree, but our varied perspectives and diversity of experience is what makes New York City great. ALL OF IT will be both companion for and curator of the myriad culture this city has to offer. In the words of Cristina De Rossi, anthropologist at Barnet and Southgate College, London: "Culture encompasses religion, food, what we wear, how we wear it, our language, marriage, music, what we believe is right or wrong, how we sit at the table, how we greet visitors, how we behave with loved ones, and a million other things." ...In other words, ALL OF IT. --- Join us for ALL OF IT with Alison Stewart, weekdays from 12:00 - 2:00PM on WNYC.

Language:

English

Contact:

WNYC Radio 160 Varick St. New York, NY 10013


Episodes

The Best 'Plane Ride Movies'

2/21/2024
In the latest installment of Small Stakes Big Opinions, we take on the best movies to watch on a plane with writer David Mack, who recently penned "What Makes a Perfect Plane Movie" for Slate. Listeners, call in to share yours.

Duration:00:26:48

Althea Gibson Makes History (Full Bio)

2/21/2024
Our Full Bio this month will focus on tennis great Althea Gibson, who broke barriers as one of the first Black athletes to cross the color line and compete on an international stage in tennis. She was also the first Black player to win a Grand Slam title. We're spending the week talking to Sally Jacobs, author of the biography Althea: The Life of Tennis Champion Althea Gibson. Today, we discuss Gibson breaking the color line, and becoming the first Black tennis player to win a Grand Slam title.

Duration:00:22:51

Designing Costumes for 'Oppenheimer' (The Big Picture)

2/21/2024
Costume designer Ellen Mirojnick has been working in the industry for decades, and has now finally been nominated for an Oscar for her work in "Oppenheimer." She joins us to discuss her work bringing this period to life, finding the right hat for Oppenheimer, and more, as part of our series "The Big Picture," which spotlights Oscar-nominated creatives working behind the camera.

Duration:00:23:14

A Year Of AI In The Workplace

2/21/2024
In December of 2022, OpenAI, the company behind several well-known artificial intelligence products, launched a free public version of ChatGPT, which first launched in earnest the conversation about how this new technology could impact our lives, particularly in the workplace. Now, a little over a year later, we check in on how much AI has actually been implemented in people's jobs. Listeners call in to share their experiences with AI at work, plus, Lauren Larson, freelance writer, most recently of a piece in The Verge called "In defense of busywork" shares her thoughts and her reporting on the subject.

Duration:00:28:14

The Paco de Lucía Legacy Festival Comes to New York

2/20/2024
Today kicks off a week of concerts for The Paco de Lucía Legacy Festival, inspired by the famous flamenco guitarist around the tenth anniversary of his death. Tonight, the festival begins with a concert at Carnegie Hall, before more than thirty musicians play in venues around the city through February 24. To preview the festival and the Carnegie Hall set tonight, we're joined by artistic director Julio Martí, and we hear a performance from guitarist and festival participant Yerai Cortés.

Duration:00:19:15

Composing the Dissonant and Fantastical Score for 'Poor Things' (The Big Picture)

2/20/2024
In order to bring the steampunk world of Bella Baxter to life for the film "Poor Things," first-time film composer Jerskin Fendrix worked with dissonant sounds to create a wholly unique score that fits the movie's fantastical universe. Fendrix joins us to discuss his work, which earned him an Oscar nomination for Best Original Score. This interview is part of our ongoing series "The Big Picture," which spotlights Oscar nominees working behind the camera.

Duration:00:24:39

Althea Gibson Trains for Glory (Full Bio)

2/20/2024
Our Full Bio this month will focus on tennis great Althea Gibson, who broke barriers as one of the first Black athletes to cross the color line and compete on an international stage in tennis. She was also the first Black player to win a Grand Slam title. We're spending the week talking to Sally Jacobs, author of the biography Althea: The Life of Tennis Champion Althea Gibson. Today, we discuss Gibson's tennis training and her college years.

Duration:00:25:20

Saving Endangered Languages In New York City

2/20/2024
New York City is one of the most linguistically diverse cities in history, and yet some of those languages are in danger of dying out. In his new book, Ross Perlin, author and co-director of the Endangered Language Alliance, follows six speakers of endangered languages in order to examine what it will take to keep these traditions alive in modern New York. Perlin joins us to discuss, Language City: The Fight to Preserve Endangered Mother Tongues in New York. Plus, we take listener calls. Event: Perlin will be speaking tonight at the Strand at 7 pm.

Duration:00:32:05

Helping Teenagers Manage Their Anxiety About the Future (Mental Health Mondays)

2/19/2024
A recent New York Times article reports that some teenagers feel that decisions made by politicians and elected officials do not reflect their needs. Psychologist Lisa Damour, co-host of the Ask Lisa podcast, joins us to discuss how to help young people deal with their anxieties about politics and their futures.

Duration:00:30:59

Previewing the 2024 Spring Theater Season

2/19/2024
With a slate of new shows planned to debut this spring, Vulture's Jackson McHenry joins to talk about some of the most anticipated from big Broadway productions to smaller off-Broadway works.

Duration:00:21:54

The Early Life of Tennis Legend Althea Gibson (Full Bio)

2/19/2024
Our Full Bio this month will focus on tennis great Althea Gibson, who broke barriers as one of the first Black athletes to cross the color line and compete on an international stage in tennis. She was also the first Black player to win a Grand Slam title. We're spending the week talking to Sally Jacobs, author of the biography Althea: The Life of Tennis Champion Althea Gibson. Today, we discuss Gibson's early life in Harlem.

Duration:00:27:51

A New Book Takes a Candid Look at Unhoused Teens

2/19/2024
Vicki Sokolik, the founder of the Florida-based nonprofit, Starting Right, Now which helps at risk and unhoused/unaccompanied young people, joins to discuss her new book, If You See Them: Young, Unhoused and Alone in America, about the invisibility of unhoused youth and resources to help.

Duration:00:20:26

Designing the Period-Accurate Costumes for 'Killers of the Flower Moon' (The Big Picture)

2/16/2024
In order to get the costumes for Osage Nation characters right for the film "Killers of the Flower Moon," costume designer Jacqueline West turned to traditional research methods, but also partnered with members of the Osage tribe to ensure that all of the characters' attire was period-accurate. West joins us to discuss her work on the film, which earned her an Oscar nomination, as part of our ongoing series The Big Picture, spotlighting the Oscar nominees who work behind the camera.

Duration:00:26:14

Sandra Hüller on Starring in Two Best Picture Nominees

2/16/2024
German actor Sandra Hüller has the distinct honor of starring in two of this year's Best Picture nominees at the Academy Awards. She is nominated for Best Actress in a Leading Role for her performance as Sandra in "Anatomy of a Fall," which follows a woman accused of murdering her husband. And she stars as the despicable Hedwig Höss in "The Zone of Interest," which follows the Nazi family and their daily lives just outside Auschwitz. Hüller joins us to discuss both films.

Duration:00:23:35

The Harrowing Sound Design of 'The Zone of Interest' (The Big Picture)

2/16/2024
Much of the horror in the Holocaust film "The Zone of Interest" is not about what you see on screen, but the terrifying noises you hear in the distance. We talk about that creative choice with Oscar nominated sound designer Johnnie Burn as part of our series "The Big Picture," which focuses on nominees who work behind the camera.

Duration:00:23:10

Coco's Tin Pan Alley Tune for Public Song Project 2024

2/16/2024
All this week, as part of the launch of the 2024 Public Song Project, we're debuting contributions from professional musicians and friends of WNYC. To wrap up the launch, we hear a song from Brooklyn supergroup Coco and speak to bandmember Maia Friedman. Afterwards, we're joined again by musicology professor Anna Celenza to talk about Tin Pan Alley and Broadway of the 1920s.

Duration:00:27:40

Valerie June for the 2024 Public Song Project

2/15/2024
All this week, as part of the launch of the 2024 Public Song Project, we're debuting contributions from professional musicians and friends of WNYC. Today we hear Valerie June's song for the project, and discuss how the 1920s were a pivotal decade for music and recording technology with Jessica Wood, assistant curator of music and recorded sound at the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts.

Duration:00:27:11

The Gilded Age and Long Island History Examined at the Nassau County Museum of Art

2/15/2024
You have just under a month to check out The Nassau County Museum of Art's exhibit, Our Gilded Age, exploring the historical era from the perspective of both the upper class and the servant class who worked for the wealthy. The show also looks at the role the north shore of Long Island played in The Gilded Age: literary history and estate culture (even the Museum itself was once the estate of a wealthy Gilded Age era merchant). Our Gilded Age is on view through March 10, and curators Franklin Perrell and Alex Maccaro join to discuss the show.

Duration:00:22:27

How Two Black Athletes Ran for Civil Rights

2/15/2024
A New York Historical Society exhibition tells the story of two Black athletes who democratized running in New York City. Allison Robinson, the associate curator of exhibitions at New-York Historical Society, and Marilyn Kushner, curator and head, Department of Prints, Photographs, and Architectural Collections, joins us to discuss the show, Running for Civil Rights: The New York Pioneer Club, 1936 – 1976 which on display through Sunday, Feb. 25.

Duration:00:15:46

Your Favorite Local Diner

2/15/2024
We all know that diner culture in New York and New Jersey is special. Nikita Richardson, editor for the New York Times Food section, recently wrote about her favorite diners in our area for the Where To Eat newsletter, and she joins to talk about her go-to diner orders and take your calls. Plus, our very own New Jersey senior reporter Nancy Solomon calls in to tell us more about what makes Jersey diner culture unique, particularly when it comes to local politics.

Duration:00:32:32