Lectures in History-logo

Lectures in History

C-SPAN

Go back to school with the country's top professors lecturing on a variety of topics in American history. New episodes posted every Saturday evening. From C-SPAN, the network that brings you "After Words" and "C-SPAN's The Weekly" podcasts.

Go back to school with the country's top professors lecturing on a variety of topics in American history. New episodes posted every Saturday evening. From C-SPAN, the network that brings you "After Words" and "C-SPAN's The Weekly" podcasts.

Location:

Washington, DC

Networks:

C-SPAN

Description:

Go back to school with the country's top professors lecturing on a variety of topics in American history. New episodes posted every Saturday evening. From C-SPAN, the network that brings you "After Words" and "C-SPAN's The Weekly" podcasts.

Twitter:

@cspan

Language:

English

Contact:

400 North Capitol Street NW Suite 650 Washington DC 20001 (202) 737-3220


Episodes

African American History and Museums

9/18/2021
The International African American Museum in Charleston, South Carolina is slated to open its doors in the summer of 2022. We sat in on a course at the Citadel looking at how and why the museum came into existence. Former Charleston Mayor Joseph Riley -- who first proposed the idea for the museum more than 20 years ago -- co-taught the course with history professor Kerry Taylor. Their guest speaker for this class session was Smithsonian Secretary Lonnie Bunch, who shared his experiences as...

Duration:00:54:25

Remembering Victims of September 11, 2001

9/11/2021
Jonathan Marwil talked to students about perceptions and remembrances of the victims of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks. The class discussion revolved around a photograph by Associated Press photographer Richard Drew of a man falling from the North Tower of the World Trade Center. During his remarks, he responded to questions. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Duration:01:10:59

Conspiracy Culture in American History

9/4/2021
Indiana University Bloomington professor Stephen Andrews taught a class about conspiracy culture in American history. He described how conspiracy theories have changed over time, but often include the involvement of groups such as the Illuminati, Freemasons, and Skull and Bones. He talked about how in the 1950s a prominent aspect of conspiracy theories was the threat of communism, but in later decades a global “New World Order” was a more common feature. This is the first of a two-part...

Duration:01:25:13

U.S. Refugee Policy Since World War II

8/28/2021
Professor Maria Cristina Garcia talked about the United States' refugee policy since World War II. She spoke about qualifications to be a refugee and how those have changed as well as legislation governing quotas and procedures. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Duration:01:01:46

Post-World War II U.S. Auto Industry

8/21/2021
University of Central Florida professor Yanek Mieczkowski teaches a class about some of the people who challenged the status quo of the U.S. auto industry from the post-World War II era to the present day. He discusses the successes and failures of people such as Harley Earl, Preston Tucker, John DeLorean, and Elon Musk. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Duration:00:53:47

Women Journalists at the Turn of the 20th Century

8/14/2021
Iowa State University professor Tracy Lucht talked about women journalists in the late-19th and early 20th centuries. She described the careers of some pioneers, such as Nellie Bly and Dorothy Dix, and the societal pressures for women writers to balance traditional femininity and a career in journalism. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Duration:01:05:24

Colonial Myths and Monuments

8/7/2021
University of Delaware Professor Zara Anishanslin taught a class about how colonial history is remembered through historic sites and monuments, and sometimes contested. She argued that people’s assumptions about Colonial America are influenced by material and popular culture, including paintings depicting early American history in the U.S. Capitol and statues of Columbus and Pocahontas. This video was provided by the University of Delaware. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit...

Duration:01:01:27

Salem Witch Trials and the Great Awakening

7/31/2021
Baylor University Professor Thomas Kidd taught a class on the First Great Awakening in the Americas, a period in the mid-18th century of Christian revitalization that swept through the colonies. He explained how the Salem witch trials and the decline of Puritanism led to an era of traveling preachers, such as George Whitefield, and an emphasis on evangelism. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Duration:01:16:49

Korean War and Civil-Military Relations

7/24/2021
Professor Joseph Glatthaar talked about the Korean War, General Douglas MacArthur’s removal from command by President Harry Truman, and civil-military relations. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Duration:00:58:31

Philosophy of W.E.B. Du Bois

7/17/2021
Professor Maurice Jackson talked about the philosophy of W.E.B. Du Bois, an influential African-American sociologist, author, and civil rights activist in late-19th and early 20th centuries. He described Du Bois' early life, his role as an educator, and his relationship with other activists of the time. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Duration:01:06:58

20th Century UFO Conspiracies

7/10/2021
Emory University professor Felix Harcourt teaches a class on how conspiracy theories about UFOs have shaped America culture. He begins in the late 1940s and describes how public opinion about extraterrestrials changed over the course of the 20th century, often paralleling societal anxieties. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Duration:01:16:49

Women in the Early Republic

7/3/2021
University of California, Riverside professor Catherine Allgor teaches a class on the lives of women during the American Revolution and the Early Republic. The history of the period has often focused on the actions of men and battlefields, with women portrayed as strictly home-centered and only achieving political influence through their husbands. Professor Allgor argues for a broader view of Revolutionary-era women, looking at how they exercised a small but increasing amount of political...

Duration:01:04:41

Guerilla Warfare in the Civil War

6/26/2021
Brown University professor Megan Kate Nelson teaches a class about guerilla warfare, which is largely characterized by its tactics, including ambushes and surprise raids on unsuspecting troops and towns. She talks about the guerrilla soldiers fighting on both the Union and Confederate sides during the Civil War. These small bands of men on horseback were nimble and difficult to capture, especially Confederate guerrillas who often did not wear uniforms and blended back into the population...

Duration:01:16:49

Early Atlantic Exploration

6/19/2021
Northeastern University professor William Fowler taught a class about early Atlantic exploration, Christopher Columbus and the discovery of the Caribbean and the Americas by Europeans. He described the oceanic ventures of the Vikings, Portuguese and Spanish as well as the navigation assumptions of the time period. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Duration:01:08:35

The Promise of Suburbia

6/12/2021
Johns Hopkins University professor Nathan Connolly teaches a class about the “promise of suburbia” after the civil rights movement. He explores the role of zoning, eminent domain, and property rights in the making of racial housing categories. He also explains how these tools were often used by local governments to impede desegregation of neighborhoods. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Duration:01:18:28

Donald Rumsfeld on the War on Terror

6/5/2021
As a guest lecturer at the Citadel Military College in Charleston, South Carolina in 2012, former Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld gives a talk he calls “The Bush Doctrine, Compassionate Conservatism, and the War on Terror." This class is from a course called “The Conservative Intellectual Tradition in America” taught by Citadel International Politics and American Government professor Mallory Factor. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Duration:02:04:46

Age & the American Revolution

5/29/2021
We visit the James Madison University classroom of professor Rebecca Brannon as she teaches about the concept of age around the time of the Revolutionary War. She debunks the myth that the Founding Fathers were all old men, and describes how fertility rates and perceptions of childhood changed during this founding period, leading to a more child-centric family culture by the early 1800s. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Duration:01:17:54

Mary Church Terrell & the Black "Mammy" Statue

5/22/2021
University of Delaware professor Alison Parker teaches a class about activist Mary Church Terrell's 1923 fight against the United Daughters of the Confederacy's attempt to erect a black "Mammy" statue in Washington, D.C. She describes how Terrell, a civil rights activist and suffragist, organized opposition and successfully prevented this "Lost Cause" statue from being built. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Duration:01:00:31

Native American & English Trade in Colonial Virginia

5/15/2021
Virginia Tech professor Jessica Taylor teaches a class about trade relationships between English colonists and Native peoples in Virginia. She talks about the trade networks between tribes prior to European contact, periods of conflict between colonists and Native Americans, and how slavery impacted the economy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Duration:01:05:22

1970s American Car Culture & Film

5/8/2021
University of Dayton professors John Heitmann and Todd Uhlman teach a class about 1970s American car culture and films of the era. Using examples like "Easy Rider," "American Graffiti" and "Badlands," they argue these films reflected many Americans' disillusionment and glorified the open road as a way to take back control in the face of societal changes. They also talk about the impact of oil shortages, the rise of coast-to-coast races called "Cannonball Runs," and the popularity of trucker...

Duration:01:14:13