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The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range". For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio

The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range". For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio

Location:

London, United Kingdom

Networks:

The Economist

Description:

The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range". For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio

Language:

English


Episodes

Ballot blocks: the squeeze on Hong Kong

8/3/2020
The territory’s elections have been postponed, its activists barred from running—police are even targeting them abroad. What next for the democracy movement? We ask whether the global protests about race will affect rampant discrimination in Arab countries, most of which host a minority black population. And the solution to a viniferous mystery that dates back a century and a half. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here...

Duration:00:24:50

Editor’s Picks: August 3rd 2020

8/3/2020
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Google: how to cope with middle age (9:15), migration as the pandemic recedes (16:25), and regional inequality in Britain. The Economist's editor-in-chief, Zanny Minton Beddoes, hosts. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Duration:00:24:22

Checks and Balance: State of the heartland

7/31/2020
Twice recently an eruption in middle America has shocked the world. Four years ago voters in Michigan, Wisconsin and Pennsylvania were decisive in putting Donald Trump in the White House. Two months ago, George Floyd’s death in Minneapolis prompted debate on racism everywhere. In a special episode on the Midwest, the region’s role in the 2020 election and America’s future, we hear from Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot, her predecessor Rahm Emmanuel, and get the latest from the Economist...

Duration:00:39:26

Living larger: Google’s challenges

7/31/2020
Enormous growth over 22 years has brought challenges, both from within and from outside; we examine the tech behemoth’s prospects. Wealth has always exploded wherever humans interacted more—and so have epidemics. We look back on the historical links between economic success and hygiene. And Dubai tries to lure tourists for its sweltering summer season. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See...

Duration:00:22:25

The Economist Asks: Edwin Moses

7/30/2020
How do you become a world-class athlete? Edwin Moses was undefeated in the 400m hurdles for 9 years, 9 months and 9 days and held the world record on four separate occasions. Anne McElvoy asks Moses, the chair of the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency, if state-sponsored doping can be eradicated, how the pandemic is affecting the Olympic Games and what does protest in sport achieve. Also, how should intersex and trans women compete in sports? Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print,...

Duration:00:30:24

Barriers to entry: covid-19 and migration

7/30/2020
The crisis has disproportionately squeezed migrants and has given many leaders an excuse to tighten borders. Will the restrictions outlast the pandemic? Balkan countries were notorious for organised crime in the 1990s—but a new report suggests the next generation of tech-savvy gangsters is even more formidable. And a look at this summer’s clutch of Mars missions. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See...

Duration:00:23:29

Babbage: Life on Mars?

7/29/2020
Three nations set out on separate missions to shed light on a question that astronomers have been asking for centuries—is there life on Mars? Alok Jha asks leading scientists about how their missions will search for signs of life on the red planet. And, why those investigating it should avoid irreversible damage to a potentially pristine ecosystem. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast.com/privacy...

Duration:00:32:41

One mightily damaging backstory: 1MDB

7/29/2020
Five years ago a $4.5bn hole in a development fund scrambled Malaysia’s politics. Now the inquiry has claimed its first scalp: that of Najib Razak, a former prime minister. We examine the grand shift of business to “shadow banks”—a more innovative, if less regulated, end of the industry. And we join a mushroom-picking expedition in China’s Yunnan province. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See...

Duration:00:25:41

Money Talks: The age of free money

7/28/2020
In response to the covid-19 pandemic governments have pumped huge amounts of cash into economies and the role of central banks is changing dramatically. Host Rachana Shanbhogue asks Henry Curr, The Economist's economics editor, whether this heralds a new era of macroeconomics. Economists Ken Rogoff and Claudia Sahm look at what else policymakers can do—should interest rates go negative? And, banking in the shadows. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and...

Duration:00:35:40

Feds up: Trump orders troops on America’s streets

7/28/2020
Camouflaged personnel with no insignia, protesters bundled into unmarked vans: the President Donald Trump's plan to put federal officers into American cities is a worrying political ploy. Our annual Big Mac index examines which currencies are over- and undervalued; we take a meaty look at what burgernomics reveals. And Indian scientists simultaneously solve a water problem while taming a fire problem. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here...

Duration:00:21:08

The World Ahead: Red, white and green

7/27/2020
In this climate-themed episode we imagine how the Republican party might pivot on environmental policy and go green for 2024. We consider how climate scientists map out different scenarios for the trajectory of global warming. Also, a journey to 2050 to see how oil companies have reinvented themselves to suck CO2 out of the atmosphere. Tom Standage hosts. Read more from at "The World If" and please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:...

Duration:00:24:23

Bat out of elsewhere? Tracing SARS-CoV-2’s origins

7/27/2020
Scientists are looking to South-East Asia to find how the virus got its start in humans. Knowing that could head off future pandemics. It is often hard to blame climate change unequivocally for weather events, but there is no other explanation for this year’s searing Arctic temperatures. And why well-to-do Africans are shopping around for more permissive passports. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See...

Duration:00:20:08

Editor’s Picks: July 27th 2020

7/27/2020
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the new era of macroeconomics; (9:25) the EU after striking a huge deal; (17:00) and the challenges for Mexico as its youth departs. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Duration:00:28:04

Checks and Balance: Flawed enforcement

7/24/2020
Plans to abolish the Minneapolis police department after the death of George Floyd are running into opposition, as Jon Fasman reports from the city. Meanwhile, President Trump has promised a surge of federal law enforcement beyond Portland. City commissioner Jo Ann Hardesty says people there will continue to protest the presence of unidentified armed officers. Might this turn into a law-and-order election? John Prideaux, The Economist’s US editor, hosts with Charlotte Howard, New York...

Duration:00:39:52

For old timers’ sake: covid-19 and care homes

7/24/2020
The pandemic has taken its greatest toll in the world’s nursing homes—but the systemic problems surrounding elderly care long predate covid-19. Economists’ usual barometers have gone topsy-turvy during the crisis, so statisticians are turning to “real-time” data; we ask if these novel measures measure up. And reflecting on the life of America’s civil-rights icon John Lewis.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here...

Duration:00:22:55

The Economist Asks: Hong Kong's future

7/23/2020
With a sweeping new national-security law, has China won the battle for Hong Kong? Anne McElvoy interviews Regina Ip, a pro-Beijing member of Hong Kong’s cabinet, and Nathan Law, a prominent pro-democracy activist who has fled to the UK. Mrs Ip claims the democratic movement has been hijacked by secessionists and that activists like Mr Law are too young to understand. Mr Law counters that Hong Kong democrats will not give up easily. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to...

Duration:00:31:03

Without a trace: Israel’s covid-19 spike

7/23/2020
Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu has gone from boasting about progress to battling protests as the country’s contact-tracing programme has been overwhelmed. Early and extreme seasonal floods in China have already displaced nearly 2m people, raising questions about the country’s grand river-management promises. And the boom in bedtime stories...for adults. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See...

Duration:00:20:03

Babbage: A punt on the Oxford vaccine

7/22/2020
Oxford University is ahead in the race to develop a covid-19 vaccine that could halt the pandemic. Yet lead researcher, Professor Sarah Gilbert, says some trial results may be delayed owing to changing virus transmissions in different countries. Also, navigating the sky with diamonds. And, why sewage can help census-takers. Kenneth Cukier hosts. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast.com/privacy...

Duration:00:24:53

Full-meddle racket: Britain’s “Russia Report”

7/22/2020
It remains unclear whether influence and misinformation campaigns have had significant effects on Britain’s institutions, or its elections—but only because successive administrations chose not to look. For decades, Myanmar was a heroin supplier to the world; now a methamphetamine-production boom has created a domestic mess, too. And spotting the brightest comet in decades. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here...

Duration:00:21:59

Money Talks: TikTok goes the clock

7/21/2020
TikTok, a video-sharing app, is caught up in the US-China clash. Can the firm restructure itself to address concerns over privacy and security? Also, why the pandemic has meant some households are awash with cash. And, a question of judgment. Patrick Lane hosts Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Duration:00:22:50