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Into America

NBCUniversal Podcasts

Into America is a show about being Black in America. These stories explore what it means to hold truth to power and this country to its promises. Told by people who have the most at stake.

Location:

United States

Description:

Into America is a show about being Black in America. These stories explore what it means to hold truth to power and this country to its promises. Told by people who have the most at stake.

Language:

English


Episodes

Uncounted Millions: Let's Get Free

2/15/2024
The movement for reparations is gaining traction across the country, as cities and states debate what is owed to the descendants of the formerly enslaved. This question – what is owed? – has plagued America since the Civil War. But what Into America discovered is that through a strange legal loophole, a small number of Black people may have managed to get paid. In this series, “Uncounted Millions: The Power of Reparations,” Pulitzer- and Emmy-winning host Trymaine Lee follows the story of Gabriel Coakley, perhaps one of the only Black men in America to receive something akin to reparations. We look at the mark it left on his family for generations and ask: if more Black families had been given a lump sum of money 150 years ago, how might the inequities facing Black America look different today? And how might knowing this story change our current conversation on reparations in America? Episode 1 begins in Brooklyn with Coakley’s descendants. With them, we travel back to before the Civil War to learn about Gabriel Coakley’s fight for freedom and, eventually, restitution.In addition to Coakley descendants John, Adele, and Richard Flateau, Trymaine is joined by: author Dr. Chris Myers Asch, archivistsDr. Lopez Matthews and Ishamel Childs, and professor Dr. Kellie Carter Jackson.

Duration:00:45:15

Presenting Uncounted Millions: The Power of Reparations

2/8/2024
Into America is back! In a new series, “Uncounted Millions,” we take a look at one of today's most pressing debates: reparations. On a journey that begins in the nation’s capital during the heat of the Civil War and ends in modern day Brooklyn, host Trymaine Lee follows the little-known story of one of the only Black people to receive reparations, and the mark it left on that family for generations to come. The series asks: if more Black families had been given reparations decades ago, how might Black America look different today? And with this series, we’re kicking off a brand new format for Into America. Going forward, we’ll be a seasonal show, giving us a chance to dive deep into the topics most salient for Black America. Here’s a sneak peek of “Uncounted Millions.” Make sure you’re following the show to stay up to date. The series debuts Thursday, February 15th.

Duration:00:03:05

BONUS: Trymaine Lee Joins "Why Is This Happening?" Live in Chicago

10/17/2023
Chris Hayes is on tour with his podcast "Why Is This Happening?" for a series of live shows. In Chicago, he celebrated 50 years of hip-hop at the House of Blues. He was joined by scholar Imani Perry, rapper Vic Mensa, and "Into America" host Trymaine Lee. Trymaine talked about why this music has meant so much to him throughout his life, why it matters for Black America - and all Americans, and what new tidbits he learned while making our "Street Disciples" series earlier this year. Plus, a quick update on "Into America." For a transcript of the episode and to hear more "Into America" or "Why Is This Happening?" please visit msnbc.com/podcasts.

Duration:01:20:39

Introducing Grapevine

10/5/2023
As a bonus for Into America listeners, we’re sharing a special preview of Grapevine, a new original podcast series from NBC News Studios. From the same team that brought you the #1 podcast Southlake, Grapevine tells the story of one family broken apart in the midst of a new anti-LGBTQ culture war, and the high school English teacher caught in the middle. Follow the podcast and listen to the first two episodes now: https://link.chtbl.com/grapevine_alw_

Duration:00:03:49

Special Preview: “Velshi Banned Book Club”

8/24/2023
Ali Velshi gives a special preview of his new podcast, “Velshi Banned Book Club,” an act of resistance against the epidemic of book banning. In each episode, a different author of a banned book joins Ali—including Margaret Atwood, Nikole Hannah-Jones, Laurie Halse Anderson and more—to talk about why their work is being targeted and about the literature itself. “Velshi Banned Book Club” is a series rooted in literary and cultural analysis and in the notion of reading as resistance. Listen to the first two episodes now and follow the series: https://link.chtbl.com/vbbc_fdlw

Duration:00:01:56

Ripples of Affirmative Inaction in California

7/20/2023
Nearly 30 years ago, California voters approved Prop 209, which banned affirmative action for the state’s public universities. For some elite schools like UC Berkeley and UCLA, Black student enrollment plummeted, changing the campuses for decades to come. On Into America, we’re going back to Cali to get a glimpse of what life on campus was like during the golden age of Black student enrollment, how the campus responded to threats to end affirmative action, and what the eventual end of the program meant for generations of Black students. Trymaine Lee speaks with former Cal student Quamé Love, along with others who have walked the campus over the years, and he’s joined by UCLA history and education professor Eddie R. Cole for context on what the Supreme Court’s decision means at this moment in the nation’s history. In this episode, you can also get a sneak peak of actress Alfre Woodard reading the entirety of Justice Brown Jackson’s dissent in the recent Supreme Court case over affirmative action for our friends over at The Beat. And an update from Into America: we’re going to be stepping away for a few months to work on a new reporting project. So we’ll be back in your feeds with a special season of the show shortly. But if you miss us before then, why not re-listen to a few of our favorite episodes below? Follow and share the show on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram, using the handle @intoamericapod. Thoughts? Feedback? Story ideas? Write to us at intoamerica@nbcuni.com. For a transcript, please visit our homepage. For more: Street Disciples: The Concrete JungleInto “I Have a Dream”The Power of the Black Vote: Taking Back the Classroom

Duration:00:41:42

UPDATE: Into Reparations with Nikole Hannah-Jones

7/13/2023
California’s official task force on reparations has delivered its final report to the state legislature. The report includes a formula for determining direct financial compensation, along with more than 100 other recommendations, including establishing universal health care, implementing rent caps in historically redlined neighborhoods, and making Election Day a paid holiday. And in their report, the authors spent a significant amount of time explaining why reparations are necessary for the descendants of enslaved Black Americans, and why the government is responsible. Three years ago, host Trymaine Lee spoke about this case for reparations with Nikole Hannah-Jones, creator of the 1619 Project, and now, a journalism professor at Howard University. The conversation came right after Nikole published her article “What is Owed” in her role as a staff writer for the New York Times Magazine. In light of California taking one small step closer toward reparations, we’re bringing back that discussion. This podcast was originally published on June 24, 2020. For more: California's reparations report excludes payment plan but is full of program proposalsFor two California reparations task force members, the hard work comes nextReconstructed: Birth of a Black Nation

Duration:00:27:57

Get Your Freaknik On (2022)

7/6/2023
When the news of a Freaknik documentary hit Twitter, people joked about seeing their parents, aunts, uncles on film having too much of a good time. Freaknik was a legendary street party that started in Atlanta back in the early 80s and became a destination for young Black people to dance, watch step shows, and see concerts. “It was the perfect storm. You know, it could not happen anywhere else. It had to happen in Atlanta,” rap legend Uncle Luke told Trymaine Lee. At one point, Luke was crowned “King of Freaknik.” This week Into America continues our celebration of Hip-Hop 50 by revisiting the rise and fall of the greatest block party America has ever seen, and the impact that Freaknik still has on Atlanta and Black youth culture today. Featuring the people who lived it, including Uncle Luke, Maurice Hobson, radio host Kenny Burns, and Freaknik co-founder Sharon Toomer. (Original release date: June 30, 2022) Follow and share the show on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram, using the handle @intoamericapod. Thoughts? Feedback? Story ideas? Write to us at intoamerica@nbcuni.com. For a transcript, please visit our homepage. For More: Street Disciples: The Concrete JungleBig Daddy Kane’s Lyrical LegacyBlack Joy in the Summertime

Duration:00:38:29

BONUS: Understanding Affirmative Action

6/30/2023
This week, the US Supreme Court struck down the use of Affirmative Action in higher education, in one of the most widely watched cases of the summer. As part of his television reporting, Trymaine Lee had a conversation with professor Cara McClellan of the University of Pennsylvania’s law school in the lead up to the decision. They talked about the history of this policy, as well as the stakes of losing it. And we wanted to share the conversation with you here on the pod as well. For more analysis of the Supreme Court decision, check out MSNBC. And keep your eyes on your podcast feeds for more from us in the coming weeks. Follow and share the show on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram, using the handle @intoamericapod. Thoughts? Feedback? Story ideas? Write to us at intoamerica@nbcuni.com. For a transcript, please visit our homepage. For More: Legal CoverageKnow Your HistoryEbony & Ivy

Duration:00:17:08

Aging with Pride

6/29/2023
Every June, Pride month is a time for self-expression and celebration. But the road here was paved with struggle and sacrifice. From confronting police during the Stonewall Uprising, to fighting to stay afloat during the AIDS crisis, to battling in the courtroom for the basic rights of citizenship, generations of LGBTQ people have faced gains and losses. Of the frontlines of each of these fights have been queer baby boomers. On this episode of Into America, Trymaine Lee speaks to elders of the Black community: Naomi Ruth Cobb, a Black lesbian activist from Florida, and Phill Wilson, of the Black AIDS Institute, based in California. We hear two stories, from opposite ends of the country, and learn what it means to find community, grow older, and never back down in the fight for equality. Follow and share the show on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram, using the handle @intoamericapod. Thoughts? Feedback? Story ideas? Write to us at intoamerica@nbcuni.com. For a transcript, please visit our homepage. For More: Pride in the Bible BeltThey lived a 'double life' for decades. Now, these gay elders are telling their stories.Black, Gray and Gay: The Perils of Aging LGBTQ People of Color

Duration:00:53:08

‘Black Folk’ and the Soul of America

6/22/2023
America as we know it today would be nothing without Black labor. From the first enslaved Africans who built our economy, to the unheralded agricultural and domestic workers during segregation, to the frontline workers who put their health on the line during the pandemic. Historian Blair LM Kelley has been highlighting the stories of the Black working class her whole career. In her new book Black Folk, she traces the story of Black workers from Reconstruction to the Civil Rights Movement. Kelley unearths forgotten stories of the sharecroppers, washerwomen, Pullman Porters, and US Postal Service employees (to name a few) who provided the engine for the American economy for generations. Beginning with her own family’s history, she details not only the hardships Black workers faced, but also the joy in community, and collective power in labor organizing, the effects of which still echo today. Follow and share the show on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram, using the handle @intoamericapod. Thoughts? Feedback? Story ideas? Write to us at intoamerica@nbcuni.com. For a transcript, please visit our homepage. For More: Into Dirty AirReconstructed: Birth of a Black NationThe Quiet Power of Preservation

Duration:00:32:55

‘Absolute Equality’ in the Home of Juneteenth

6/15/2023
In Galveston, Texas on June 19, 1865, Union General Gordon Granger announced General Order No. 3: “the people of Texas are informed that, in accordance with a Proclamation from the Executive of the United States, all slaves are free.” The day became known as Juneteenth, commemorating the actual end of slavery in the United States. Yet more than a century and a half later, Black people in Galveston are still fighting for the “absolute equality” promised to them in that order. The biggest threat today is gentrification, which began after Hurricane Ike in 2008 destroyed the city’s overwhelmingly Black public housing. The situation was made worse recently by a short-term rental boom fueled by the pandemic. Since 2000, the Black population has plummeted by 38 percent. On this episode of Into America, Trymaine Lee travels to Galveston to speak with Sam Collins of the Juneteenth Legacy Project, June Pulliam, whose great-great grandparents moved to the island in 1865, and lawyer and activist Anthony P. Griffin, who is trying to preserve land for Black folks in this historic city. Follow and share the show on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram, using the handle @intoamericapod. Thoughts? Feedback? Story ideas? Write to us at intoamerica@nbcuni.com. For a transcript, please visit our homepage. For More: DC Votes YesJuneteenth is an opportunity for America to reckon with its racial wealth gapJuneteenth shouldn't be about Black people spending but about Black people getting paid

Duration:00:31:58

BONUS: Rachel Maddow Presents: Déjà News

6/12/2023
As a bonus for listeners, we’re sharing a special preview of “Rachel Maddow Presents: Déjà News,” a new original podcast series from MSNBC. In each episode, Rachel Maddow and co-host Isaac-Davy Aronson seek a deeper understanding of a story in today's headlines by asking: Has anything like this ever happened before? Would knowing that help us grapple with what’s happening now… and what might happen next? Listen to the first episode now and follow the series: https://link.chtbl.com/rmpdn_fdlw

Duration:00:05:11

I’m Trym(AI)ne Lee

6/8/2023
The future is now. Artificial Intelligence already exists in smartphones, helps power social media algorithms, and is accessible through countless apps. AI has generated rappers with records deals and political attack ads. But as AI gains mainstream attention, AI-powered software that helps landlords select tenants has been proven to discriminate against Black applicants and algorithms have misinterpreted healthcare data, resulting in fewer services for Black patients. On this episode of Into America, Trymaine Lee speaks with Gelyn Watkins of Black in AI, to understand the implications of AI for Black America. Together, they test a popular app for accuracy and bias. And, Trymaine has a conversation with the AI version of himself. Follow and share the show on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram, using the handle @intoamericapod. Thoughts? Feedback? Story ideas? Write to us at intoamerica@nbcuni.com. For a transcript & to check out an AI-generated image of Trymaine, please visit our homepage. For More: AI risks leading humanity to 'extinction,' experts warnWhy artificial intelligence needs to be on your mind in 2023Behind the Power and Threat of A.I.

Duration:00:30:39

Don’t Send the Police: Freedom House Rides Again

6/1/2023
Last week, Into America told the story of Freedom House, a Black-run ambulance service that defined American EMS in the late 1960s. Today, The Healing and Justice Center in Miami, FL operates Freedom House Mobile and Crisis Units, expanding the legacy of wellness from physical to emotional and mental health. In this special two-part story, Into America explores Freedom House then and now; and how Black communities have always worked to keep themselves safe. On part two of ‘Don’t Send the Police,’ Trymaine Lee heads to Miami to speak with Rachel Gilmer, the director of the Healing and Justice Center; Dr. Armen Henderson, director of Health Programs at Dream Defenders, the Center’s parent organization; and others who are spending their days healing the community. Follow and share the show on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram, using the handle @intoamericapod. Thoughts? Feedback? Story ideas? Write to us at intoamerica@nbcuni.com. For a transcript, please visit our homepage. For More: Don’t Send the Police: Send Freedom HouseCaring People Behind a Miami Mental-Health Initiative Want to Change a Tragic Narrative | Editorial

Duration:00:31:21

Don’t Send the Police: Send Freedom House

5/25/2023
In May 2020, the murder of George Floyd inspired people to take to the streets in America and overseas, calling for cop reform, the defunding of police, or saying police should be abolished altogether. And as racial injustices continued, communities took matters into their own hands. The Healing and Justice Center in Miami, FL rolled out Freedom House Mobile and Crisis Units as an alternative to people having to call police, particularly in mental health emergencies. The group draws its name and inspiration fromFreedom House in Pittsburgh, which in 1968, became the nation’s first paramedics. Prior to 1968, police would transport people to the hospital during medical emergencies; but in Black communities, the result was often a disaster. Freedom House was all Black, rooted in community, and able to save lives. In a special two-part story, Into America explores Freedom House then and now; and how Black communities have always worked to keep themselves safe. On part one of ‘Don’t Send the Police,’ Trymaine Lee speaks with retired paramedic and health-care worker John Moon about how Freedom House began, and its lasting impact for generations to come. Follow and share the show on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram, using the handle @intoamericapod. Thoughts? Feedback? Story ideas? Write to us at intoamerica@nbcuni.com. For a transcript, please visit our homepage. For More: Into Reimagining Mental Health and PolicingGeorge Floyd's Murder Won't Change Policing Without SenateAt Freedom House, these Black men saved lives. Paramedics are book topic

Duration:00:37:31

Writers Strike Black

5/18/2023
The entertainment industry and its TV and film writers can’t get on the same page. For the first time in over a decade, the Writers Guild of America is on strike. Shows like Saturday Night Live have already stopped production, with more to come as the WGA and the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers try to reach a labor agreement. As networks and film studios continue make record-high profits, writers are fighting for livable wages and fair compensation in the streaming era. And for the Black writers and the community at large, there’s much more at stake. For decades, Black writers were shut out of writers’ rooms, unable to tell their own stories. As the industry changed, these scribes were only relegated to write comedy. Today, just a handful have made it to the top of the television hierarchy as showrunners. Anthony Sparks, a 20-year industry veteran told Trymaine Lee that for him, the strike is about making sure writing can continue to be a viable career path for people like him. Because if the industry doesn’t change, Black writers could get squeezed out, and Black audiences risk losing representation, or worse – having outsiders control it. Follow and share the show on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram, using the handle @intoamericapod. Thoughts? Feedback? Story ideas? Write to us at intoamerica@nbcuni.com. For a transcript, please visit our homepage. For More: The Re-Freshed Prince of Bel-AirComedian Cristela Alonzo explains why WGA writers are on strikeWGA Says Strike Is Costing California’s Economy $30 Million A Day

Duration:00:36:59

Healing in Buffalo

5/11/2023
In May of last year, Tops Supermarket in East Buffalo was attacked by a lone white supremacist. Motivated by “great replacement theory,” the shooter targeted an area densely populated with Black residents, leaving this community grief-stricken. Into America visited Buffalo and spoke with residents shortly after the incident, so now, on the anniversary of the shooting, Trymaine Lee headed back to East Buffalo to revisit this community which has found strength and healing through each other. Trymaine Lee speaks with Trinetta Alston, a nurse who’s made it her mission to look after the Tops survivors. And he visits the Love Supreme School of Music, which is putting on a series of wellness concerts for the community. And we get a heartwarming update from former guest Fragrance Harris Stanfield, who was working at Tops the day of the shooting. Follow and share the show on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram, using the handle @intoamericapod. Thoughts? Feedback? Story ideas? Write to us at intoamerica@nbcuni.com. For a transcript, please visit our homepage. For More: Buffalo shooter sentenced to life in prison for racist attackWhy My Cousin Who Died in the Buffalo Mass Shooting Would Forgive the ShooterWatch Trymaine Lee on NBC News Now after Tops reopened

Duration:00:36:44

For Delroy Lindo and Tracy McMillan, Art Imitates Life

5/4/2023
Tracy McMillan’s dad spent most of her life in prison, getting out for the last time when she was in her 40s. But for all the movies and shows about prison, she hadn’t seen her experience portrayed on screen in a way that resonated with her. So, as a successful television writer and author, she decided to write it herself — for her and the millions of others who grew up with a parent behind bars. After years of work, Tracy’s story became Hulu’s new hit show UnPrisoned. It’s a funny and heartfelt take on what happens when a father who has spent decades in prison, played by Delroy Lindo, comes to live with his adult daughter, played by Kerry Washington. This week, Trymaine sits down with Tracy and Delroy, for an eye-opening conversation about their experiences from childhood, their relationship with their fathers, and the healing power of art. Follow and share the show on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram, using the handle @intoamericapod. Thoughts? Feedback? Story ideas? Write to us at intoamerica@nbcuni.com. For a transcript, please visit our homepage. For More: UnPrisonedThe Re-Freshed Prince of Bel AirKerry Washington talks ‘Unprisoned,’ writing a memoir

Duration:00:46:11

The Right to Life

4/27/2023
Black women are three times more likely to suffer from pregnancy and childbirth complications than white women. And when faced with a health scare, terminating a pregnancy has been a way for doctors to save the life of the mother. But under strict new limits on abortion, doctors are often forced to hold off on critical care, like in Florida, where a 15-week ban meant that Anya Cook almost died after she began experiencing something called PPROM, which can cause infection and hemorrhaging. Months after that incident, Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis signed a bill aimed to shorten the state’s ban to just 6 weeks, potentially putting more lives in the balance. On Into America, Trymaine Lee speaks with Anya, as well as OBGYN Dr. Zsakeba Henderson, to learn how abortion limits are disproportionately affecting Black mothers nearly one year since Roe was overturned. Follow and share the show on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram, using the handle @intoamericapod. Thoughts? Feedback? Story ideas? Write to us at intoamerica@nbcuni.com. For a transcript, please visit our homepage. For More: Two women were denied medical care due to Florida's abortion banDeSantis quietly signs extreme six-week abortion ban into lawInside a Texas Abortion Clinic

Duration:00:38:31