Post Reports-logo

Post Reports

News & Politics Podcasts

Post Reports is the daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Everything you’ve come to expect from the newsroom of The Post, for your ears. Martine Powers and Elahe Izadi are your hosts, asking the questions you didn’t know you wanted answered. Published weekdays around 5 p.m. Eastern time.

Location:

United States

Description:

Post Reports is the daily podcast from The Washington Post. Unparalleled reporting. Expert insight. Clear analysis. Everything you’ve come to expect from the newsroom of The Post, for your ears. Martine Powers and Elahe Izadi are your hosts, asking the questions you didn’t know you wanted answered. Published weekdays around 5 p.m. Eastern time.

Language:

English

Contact:

202-334-9768


Episodes

Can Tesla’s Full Self-Driving mode be trusted?

2/21/2024
Today, as automakers race toward a driverless future, The Post’s technology reporter Trisha Thadani breaks down a Post investigation into a 2022 car crash in Colorado and the questions it raises about new self-driving technology on the road now. Read more: In May of 2022, Hans von Ohain and his friend Erik Rossiter went golfing in Evergreen, Colo. Hans showed off his Tesla’s new Full Self-Driving mode. The friends shared drinks and played 21 holes of golf. But Hans never made it home. On the drive back along a curvy mountain road, Hans and his Tesla swerved into a tree and burst into flames. Erik survived. Hans died in the fire. When Post technology reporter Trisha Thadani learned of the accident, it surprised her. First, if Full Self-Driving mode was engaged when the car crashed, it would be the first confirmed fatality connected to the technology. Then she discovered that Hans was a Tesla employee. Today on “Post Reports,” Trisha breaks down what she and a team of reporters learned about the moments leading up to the fatal crash and the bigger conversation about safety regulations on autonomous driving technology. Today’s show was produced by Emma Talkoff. It was edited by Monica Campbell and mixed by Sean Carter. Thanks to Maggie Penman. The reporters who Trisha Thadani worked with on the Tesla investigation include Faiz Siddiqui, Rachel Lerman, Julia Wall and Whitney Shefte. Subscribe to The Washington Post here.

Duration:00:27:09

Navalny’s legacy

2/20/2024
The death of Vladimir Putin's largest opponent, Alexei Navalny, has rocked hopes of democracy in Russia. We speak with The Post's David M. Herszenhorn, who covered Navalny in Russia, about the impact of his death and Putin's tightening grip on power. Read more: Alexei Navalny had been a charismatic and outspoken critic of the Kremlin for more than a decade, and was the target of an assassination attempt. Last year, Navalny was sentenced to 19 years in prison on charges of “extremism,” but was seen alive and seemingly healthy just a few days before his death. President Biden condemned Navalny’s death as “proof of Putin’s brutality.” The Post’s David M. Herszenhorn has written extensively about Navalny’s career and activism. Herszenhorn joins Post Reports to talk about Navalny’s legacy, and what the Russian political landscape might look like without him. Today’s show was produced by Elana Gordon with help from Peter Bresnan. It was mixed by Sean Carter. It was edited by Lucy Perkins. Subscribe to The Washington Post here.

Duration:00:28:32

Deep Reads: The judgment of São Miguel

2/17/2024
The isolated river village of São Miguel had for years been shielded from a wave of religious conversions remaking the Amazon rainforest of Brazil. While many across the traditionally Catholic country were becoming evangelical Protestants, São Miguel had remained steadfast in its Catholic faith. Then one day, a pastor rumored to have mystical powers arrived and opened the community’s first evangelical church. Since then, the village has fractured in a bitter battle over its religious soul. Now the village must decide. For the first time in a year, an itinerant Catholic priest was journeying downriver on a small boat to celebrate the village's annual Mass. How many villagers would go? Which faith would São Miguel choose? This story is part of our Deep Reads series, which showcases narrative journalism at The Washington Post. It was written and read by Terrence McCoy. Audio production and original composition by Bishop Sand.

Duration:00:31:39

The Campaign Moment: From Trump to Swift

2/16/2024
It’s hard to keep track of all the biggest political news and what it could mean in this campaign year. That’s why Post Reports is launching a weekly episode on Fridays called “The Campaign Moment.” You’ll hear senior political reporter Aaron Blake, who writes The Post’s new newsletter by the same name, and other colleagues from our Politics team break down the stories that matter. In this inaugural episode, reporter Leigh Ann Caldwell also joins Martine Powers to discuss Thursday’s hearings in the Trump trials, the former president’s comments about NATO and what the GOP’s reaction to them could mean, the results of New York’s special election this week and whether a Taylor Swift endorsement in the presidential campaign would matter. Today’s show was produced and mixed by Ted Muldoon. It was edited by Renita Jablonski. Subscribe to Aaron’s newsletter, The Campaign Moment, here. And you can sign up for The Early 202, which Leigh Ann co-authors, here. Subscribe to The Washington Post here.

Duration:00:33:36

The destabilizing force of AI deepfakes in politics

2/15/2024
AI-generated content seems to be getting more realistic every day. Today on “Post Reports,” we talk about how it’s already been a factor in the 2024 presidential campaign, and in elections around the world. Read more: On Tuesday, London Mayor Sadiq Khan said that fake audio of him making inflammatory comments before last year’s Armistice Day almost caused “serious disorder.” Today on Post Reports, tech reporter Pranshu Verma breaks down how AI-generated content has been influencing the 2024 presidential election and elections around the world. In addition to the threat of deepfakes, politicians have also been blaming AI for real gaffes caught on video or audio. Can you tell which of these break-up texts are AI-generated? Take our quiz and find out. Today’s show was produced by Bishop Sand and mixed by Sean Carter. It was edited by Maggie Penman. Subscribe to The Washington Post here.

Duration:00:22:48

Why many older women are saying “I don’t” to marriage

2/14/2024
Whether they are widowed, divorced,or have never married, more women over the age of 50 are choosing the single life. It has nothing to do with love and everything to do with protecting their finances. Read more: In the coming decade, women will hold greater economic power than they did in previous generations. Economists at McKinsey estimate that by 2030, American women are poised to control much of the $30 trillion in personal wealth that baby boomers are expected to possess. This shift in the financial landscape means more women are taking control of their finances and protecting their wealth. For some, that means choosing not to get married later in life. Whether they are widowed, divorced or have never married, more women over the age of 50 aren’t walking down the aisle. They’re walking to the bank. Today’s show was produced by Charla Freeland. It was mixed by Sean Carter. It was edited by Lucy Perkins. Subscribe to The Washington Post here.

Duration:00:26:26

The growing dissent over Biden’s Israel policy

2/13/2024
President Biden’s defense of Israel amid the war in Gaza has roiled his administration. Today on “Post Reports,” we hear from officials who resigned over Biden’s policies. The Post’s Yasmeen Abutaleb also explains Biden’s bond with Israel. Read more: Since the war in Gaza began, the Biden administration has been outspoken in its support of Israel. But as the Israel-Gaza war enters its fifth month and the number of dead in Gaza rises over 28,000, there have been growing calls inside both Congress and the Biden administration for the president to change course. Congressional staffers have staged walkouts and signed letters demanding a ceasefire. Dissent cables have been leaked. And two officials – Josh Paul and Tariq Habash – have resigned publicly over the Biden administration’s handling of the war in Gaza. Today, they join “‘Post Reports” to explain why they left. Also, White House reporter Yasmeen Abutaleb breaks down why Biden has been so steadfast in his public support for Israel in spite of growing dissent. She unpacks Biden’s complicated relationship with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and whether Biden may change his approach. Today’s show was produced by Peter Bresnan and edited by Monica Campbell. It was mixed by Sean Carter. Thanks to Rennie Svirnovskiy and Arjun Singh. Subscribe to The Washington Post here.

Duration:00:32:20

The “last refuge” in Gaza

2/12/2024
Today on “Post Reports,” Israel’s latest operation in Gaza, and what it tells us about its strategy in the war. Read more: On Monday local time, Israel carried out a round of deadly airstrikes on the southern Gaza city of Rafah, where more than 1.4 million Palestinians have sought refuge. The strikes killed at least 67 Palestinians, including women and children, according to the Gaza Health Ministry. Israel said its aim was to rescue hostages taken by Hamas during the Oct. 7 attack. Under the cover of the strikes, Israel’s special forces freed two elderly hostages. Two Israeli soldiers were killed in the operation. The airstrikes touched off a wave of fear in Rafah, which has become a last resort for Gazans fleeing violence farther north. The operation has also raised questions about Israel’s strategy and drawn fresh international criticism over the growing humanitarian crisis in Gaza. Miriam Berger breaks down this latest operation and what we know about Israel's plan. Today’s show was produced by Rennie Svirnovskiy, with help from Emma Talkoff. It was mixed by Sean Carter. It was edited by Ariel Plotnick and Lucy Perkins. Subscribe to The Washington Post here.

Duration:00:18:23

We all watch football. But who is playing it?

2/11/2024
Today on a bonus episode of “Post Reports” in honor of the Super Bowl, we go to one of the communities where tackle football still reigns. Read more: For decades, few things have united America as consistently and completely as football. But when it comes to actually playing tackle football — and risking the physical toll of a sport linked to brain damage — there are wide divisions marked by politics, economics and race, an examination by The Washington Post found. As the sport grapples with the steep overall decline in participation among young people, some of those divisions appear to be getting wider, The Post found, with football’s risks continuing to be borne by boys in places that tend to be poorer and more conservative — a revelation with disturbing implications for the future of the sport. Today on the show, we go to one of the communities where tackle football still reigns with reporter Michael Lee. Today’s show was produced by Emma Talkoff. It was edited by Maggie Penman, Joe Tone, and KC Schaper. It was mixed by Sam Bair. Subscribe to The Washington Post here.

Duration:00:26:31

Biden's fury over the special counsel report

2/9/2024
A special counsel report on President Biden concluded that he would not be charged for mishandling sensitive documents. Yet the report painted a scathing picture of the president’s memory, refueling attacks on his mental agility as he faces reelection. Read more: On Thursday evening, President Biden gave an emotional and angry response to a report issued by special counsel Robert K. Hur. While the report found that criminal charges were not merited for Biden’s handling of classified documents, it detailed moments when Biden appeared hazy on specific critical dates and years during his interviews with Hur, a Republican appointed by Attorney General Merrick Garland as special counsel. One line from Hur’s report suggested that Biden did not recall the year in which his son Beau had passed away. Beau Biden died of cancer in 2015, when his father was vice president. The president said he remembers his son’s death every day. Biden also highlighted a separate investigation into former president Donald Trump’s own handling of classified documents, and the differences between them. The president, who is 81, has been fighting off voters’ concerns about his age as he prepares to seek reelection – likely against Trump. Today’s show was produced and mixed by Ted Muldoon with help from Arjun Singh. It was edited by Monica Campbell. Subscribe to The Washington Post here.

Duration:00:17:32

Supreme Court seems ready to keep Trump on the ballot

2/8/2024
The Supreme Court seemed prepared to keep Donald Trump on the Colorado ballot Thursday, expressing concern about a single state disqualifying a candidate from seeking national office. Today on the show, we break down what we heard and what it means. Read more: On Thursday, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments in former president Donald Trump’s appeal of a Colorado ruling to remove him from the state’s 2024 primary ballot because of his role in the insurrection on Jan. 6, 2021. We break down what we heard with Supreme Court reporter Ann Marimow and politics reporter Amber Phillips. Today’s show was produced by Rennie Svirnovskiy, Emma Talkoff and Ted Muldoon, who also mixed the show. It was edited by Maggie Penman. Thank you to Debbi Wilgoren. Subscribe to The Washington Post here.

Duration:00:23:38

Why El Salvador elected a self-proclaimed 'coolest dictator'

2/7/2024
On Sunday, President Nayib Bukele won reelection in El Salvador in a landslide. Today, The Post’s Mary Beth Sheridan addresses what’s behind Bukele’s striking popularity, his self-proclaimed nickname on social media and his controversial war on gangs. Nayib Bukele first took office in 2019 as an independent, becoming El Salvador’s – and Latin America’s – youngest president. He made a name for himself through his alleged crackdown on gangs and savvy use of social media to market his efforts. While consolidating power and operating in a state of emergency, Bukele oversaw the imprisonment of more than 1 percent of El Salvador’s population. The improvements to safety have been celebrated across El Salvador, and other Latin American leaders are taking note of the approach. But these developments are also raising concerns that they come at a cost to human rights and democracy. Despite voting irregularities and a controversial decision that allowed him to skirt a ban on immediate reelection, Bukele continues to have widespread support. Read More: ‘World’s coolest dictator’ reelected in El Salvador: What to know. How to match Bukele’s success against gangs? First, dismantle democracy. Today’s show was produced by Elana Gordon and edited by Monica Campbell. It was mixed by Sam Bair. Thanks to Carmen Valeria Escobar for additional reporting. Subscribe to The Washington Post here.

Duration:00:30:38

The 91-year-old fighting to kick Trump off the ballot

2/6/2024
Today on “Post Reports,” we’re going deep on Trump v. Anderson, the Supreme Court case that could reshape the course of the 2024 election. Read more: Norma Anderson carries a pocket Constitution in her purse. She has another copy, slightly larger with images of the Founding Fathers on the cover, that she leaves on a table in her sitting room so she can consult it when she watches TV. She’s turned down a page corner in that copy to mark the spot where the 14th Amendment appears. She has reread it several times since joining a lawsuit last year that cites the amendment in seeking to stop Donald Trump from running for president again. Anderson, 91, is the unlikely face of a challenge to Trump’s campaign that will be heard by the Supreme Court on Thursday. She spoke to our colleague Patrick Marley about why she feels so strongly about this fight. Today on the show, we learn more about Anderson and go deep on Section 3 of the 14th Amendment with historian Eric Foner. Today’s show was produced and mixed by Ted Muldoon. It was edited by Maggie Penman. Thank you to Peter Bresnan, Whitney Leaming and Griff Witte.  Subscribe to The Washington Post here.

Duration:00:33:53

Iran’s proxy attacks in the Middle East

2/5/2024
After a drone attack killed three U.S. soldiers in Jordan last week, the United States struck more than 85 targets in Iraq and Syria on Friday. The U.S. response is the latest escalation in a widening conflict in the Middle East. Read more: Several Iran-allied groups aligned with Hamas have mobilized since the militant organization’s Oct. 7 attack on Israel prompted an ongoing Israeli military offensive. According to Pentagon data, Iranian-backed militias have launched at least 165 attacks on U.S. forces since October – including a drone attack that killed three U.S. service members. Intelligence and national security correspondent Shane Harris explains what led to the U.S. airstrikes on Friday and what the consequences could be. Today’s show was produced by Ariel Plotnick. It was mixed by Sean Carter. It was edited by Lucy Perkins. Thanks also to Bishop Sand and Maggie Penman.

Duration:00:28:25

Deep Reads: Ripples of hate

2/3/2024
One month into the Israel-Gaza war, Ashish Prashar put on a kaffiyeh and took his 18-month-old son to a playground near their home in Brooklyn, where a woman he’d never seen before began yelling at him. As Prashar took out his phone and began filming, the woman continued to yell, threw her phone at him, and then threw a coffee cup holding a hot beverage. It was a chance encounter that led to spiraling repercussions: a police investigation, hate crime charges, an angry mob on the internet, a wrongly identified assailant, and a father left with questions about justice, mercy and what anger in such fraught times can turn into. This story is part of our Deep Reads series, which showcases narrative journalism at The Washington Post. It was written and read by Ruby Cramer. Audio production and original composition by Bishop Sand.

Duration:00:32:43

The Texas border city caught in a constitutional crisis

2/2/2024
Texas Gov. Greg Abbott (R) is in a standoff with the U.S. government over who controls the Texas border with Mexico. That fight has centered on the border city of Eagle Pass, where Abbott has seized a park and is testing the limits of the Constitution Read more: Eagle Pass, Tex., is a small border city that in recent weeks has been mired in a bitter standoff between Texas Gov. Greg Abbott (R) and the federal government. In an effort to deter migrants from crossing the border from Mexico to Eagle Pass, Abbott seized a local park and covered barriers with coils of razor wire. That has put him at odds with President Biden and the Department of Homeland Security, who claim Abbott does not have jurisdiction over the southern border. In January, the Supreme Court ruled that federal agents were allowed to cut through the razor wire installed by Abbott’s administration, but the governor has remained defiant, raising constitutional questions about how much power the Texas governor has to secure the border of the state. Arelis Hernández joins us today to explain the origin of this standoff and provide us with a firsthand look at how both state and federal immigration policies are affecting the residents of Eagle Pass. Our colleagues at The Washington Post are monitoring right-wing protests expected in Eagle Pass over the weekend. Follow our coverage at washingtonpost.com. Today’s show was produced by Arjun Singh. It was mixed by Sean Carter. And edited by Lucy Perkins and Monica Campbell. Thanks also to Christine Armario.

Duration:00:25:39

Why Mark Zuckerberg apologized

2/1/2024
On Wednesday, U.S. senators hammered major tech CEOs for not doing more to prevent child abuse online. Today on “Post Reports,” we dive into the takeaways from a contentious Senate hearing amid rising concerns about the well-being of youth online. Read more: In a bipartisan push, the Senate Judiciary Committee gathered to scrutinize the chief executives of Meta, TikTok, Snap, Discord and X, formerly known as Twitter, about child abuse on their platforms. The hearing largely focused on how to eliminate child sexual abuse material, but senators also questioned social media’s influence on mental health and overall safety. Relatives of online child abuse victims also attended the hearing. Lawmakers reserved rows of seats for families whose loved ones had died, with their deaths linked to social media. At one point, Meta CEO Mark Zuckerberg turned to the families and apologized. Tech reporter Cristiano Lima-Strong writes The Post’s Technology 202 newsletter, and was at the hearing. He reported on the hearing’s main takeaways and why Congress has stagnated for years when it comes to child safety online. Today’s show was produced by Rennie Svirnovskiy, with help from Sabby Robinson. It was mixed by Sean Carter and edited by Monica Campbell. Subscribe to The Technology 202 newsletter here.  Subscribe to The Washington Post here.

Duration:00:28:43

The broken promises of the NFL’s concussion settlement

1/31/2024
The “landmark” settlement promised payouts for suffering players. But a Washington Post investigation found that strict guidelines and aggressive reviews have led to denials for hundreds of players diagnosed with dementia, including many who died with CTE. Read more: This week, there has been a lot of excitement about football as fans gear up for a Super Bowl attended by Taylor Swift (assuming she can make it in time from her concert in Tokyo.) It’s easy to forget that just a few years ago, we were having a very different conversation about the NFL. “It actually goes back to 2011 or so, which is when hundreds and eventually thousands of former players began suing the league over allegations, basically, that the league had lied to them about the long term dangers of concussions,” explains sports reporter Will Hobson. A “landmark” settlement in 2015 promised payouts for players with dementia and their families. But a Washington Post investigation found that behind the scenes, the settlement routinely fails to deliver money and medical care to former players suffering from dementia and CTE. Read the key findings from The Post’s investigation of the NFL concussion settlement here. What questions do you have about The Concussion Files? Ask The Post. Today’s show was produced and mixed by Ted Muldoon. It was edited by Maggie Penman. Thank you to Joe Tone and Wendy Galietta. Subscribe to The Washington Post here.

Duration:00:21:45

The debate over gas stoves reignites

1/30/2024
This week, the Energy Department announced new standards for gas stoves made after 2028. The government isn’t coming for your gas stoves — but should it? We talk about the risks with Climate Coach columnist Michael Coren. Read more: Gas stoves have been fiercely debated for decades — most recently after a government employee suggested that they should be banned. There’s mounting evidence that they emit a mix of gases that can lead to respiratory illnesses and also produce tons of carbon pollution every year. This week, the Energy Department announced new regulations for gas stoves – but we wanted to know, how worried should we be about cooking on the ones we already have in our homes? Today on “Post Reports,” we talk to Michael Coren, who writes the Climate Coach advice column. He’s reported on what actually happens when you cook using a gas stove, and how to switch over to more sustainable alternative ways of cooking — or mitigate the health effects of using your gas stove in the meantime. Today’s show was produced by Sabby Robinson. It was mixed by Sean Carter. It was edited by Maggie Penman. Thank you to Alice Li. Subscribe to the “Climate Coach” newsletter here. Subscribe to The Washington Post here.

Duration:00:19:58

What the U.N. court ruling means for Israel and Gaza

1/29/2024
On Friday, the International Court of Justice ordered Israel to do more to prevent civilian deaths in Gaza. South Africa brought the case to the court, alleging that Israel is committing genocide. Today, we break down the court’s ruling. Read more: This month, the International Court of Justice heard a case brought by South Africa against Israel. South Africa alleged that, following the attacks on Oct. 7 by Hamas, Israel has committed genocide during its military campaign in the Gaza Strip. Israel strenuously denied the allegations. Last week, the ICJ announced an initial ruling in the case. The court ordered Israel to enact several “provisional measures” to prevent the possibility of genocide. The final decision on whether Israel is committing genocide in Gaza could take years to decide. The Washington Post’s Brussels bureau chief, Emily Rauhala, was in The Hague on Friday when the decision was announced. She joins Post Reports to explain the court’s decision, and discuss what happens next. Today’s show was produced by Peter Bresnan. It was mixed by Sam Bair. And edited by Lucy Perkins. Thanks also to Marisa Bellack, Erin Cunningham and Matt Brown. Subscribe to The Washington Post here.

Duration:00:20:52