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The Daily

New York Times

This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

Location:

New York, NY

Description:

This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

Language:

English


Episodes

Putting a Price on Pollution

7/23/2021
Extreme weather across Europe, North America and Asia is highlighting a harsh reality of science and history: The world as a whole is neither prepared to slow down climate change nor live with it. European officials are trying to change that. The European Commission, the E.U.’s executive arm, recently introduced ambitious legislation aimed at sharply cutting emissions to slow down climate change within the next decade, specifically by weaning one of the world’s biggest and most polluting...

Duration:00:27:52

Who Killed Haiti’s President?

7/22/2021
A promise of a well-paying assignment abroad for retired Colombian soldiers. A security company in Miami. An evangelical Haitian American pastor with lofty ideas. Trying to join the dots in the assassination of President Jovenel Moïse took us from the Caribbean to South America to Florida — and there are still plenty of questions. Guest: Julie Turkewitz, the Andes bureau chief for The New York Times, and Frances Robles, a national and foreign correspondent for The Times based in...

Duration:00:34:08

Reacting to Chinese Cyberattacks

7/21/2021
The Chinese government’s hacking of Microsoft was bold and brazen. The Biden administration tried to orchestrate a muscular and coordinated response with Western allies. But while the U.S. has responded to cyberattacks from Russia with economic sanctions, when it comes to Beijing, the approach is more complicated. Why does the U.S. take a different course with China? Guest: David E. Sanger, a White House and national security correspondent for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The...

Duration:00:26:12

Facebook vs. the White House

7/20/2021
Is misinformation on Facebook an impediment to ending the pandemic? President Biden even said that platforms like Facebook, by harboring skepticism about the shots, were killing people. Facebook immediately rejected the criticism, but who is right? Guest: Cecilia Kang, a correspondent covering technology and regulatory policy for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together,...

Duration:00:26:48

Do We Need a Third Covid Shot?

7/19/2021
The rise of the Delta variant has prompted a thorny question: Do we need a booster dose of the vaccine for Covid-19? Vaccine makers think so, but regulators are yet to be convinced. Principles are also at stake: Should richer countries be talking about administering extra doses when so many people around the world are yet to receive even a single shot? Guest: Rebecca Robbins, a business reporter covering Covid-19 vaccines for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox...

Duration:00:24:37

The Sunday Read: ‘The Mystery of the $113 Million Deli’

7/18/2021
It made headlines around the world: a New Jersey sandwich shop with a soaring stock price. Was it just speculation, or something stranger? This story was written by Jesse Barron and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publications like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

Duration:00:35:21

State-Sponsored Abuse in Canada

7/16/2021
This episode contains accounts of physical and sexual abuse. The residential school system was devised by the Canadian government under the auspices of education, but very little education took place. Instead, children were taken from their families in order to wipe out Indigenous languages and culture. In 1959, when Garry Gottfriedson was 5, he was sent to one such school: Kamloops Indian Residential School. On today’s episode, we hear his story and explore how Indigenous activists have...

Duration:00:28:52

Cubans Take to the Streets

7/15/2021
This episode contains strong language. It was a surprise to many recently when protesters took to the streets in a small town near Havana to express their grievances with Cuba’s authoritarian government. Cubans do not protest in huge numbers. Even more remarkable: The protests spread across the island. Why are Cubans protesting, and what happens next? Guest: Ernesto Londoño, the Brazil bureau chief for The New York Times, covering the southern cone of South America. Sign up here to get...

Duration:00:28:42

The Heat Wave That Hit the Pacific Northwest

7/14/2021
The heat wave that hit the usually cool and rainy American Pacific Northwest was a shock to many — Oregon and Washington were covered by a blanket of heat in the triple digits. After the temperatures soared, a group of scientists quickly came together to answer a crucial question: How much is climate change to blame? Guest: Henry Fountain, a climate change reporter for The New York Times; and Sergio Olmos, a freelancer for The Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each...

Duration:00:27:09

Will a Top Trump Deputy Flip?

7/13/2021
In its investigation of the Trump Organization’s financial affairs, the Manhattan district attorney’s office has zeroed in on Allen Weisselberg, the company’s former finance chief, who spent almost half a century working for the Trump family. Criminal charges have been brought against Mr. Weisselberg in the hopes of getting him to cooperate in an investigation of former President Donald Trump. Will he flip? Guest: Ben Protess, an investigative reporter for The New York Times; and Michael...

Duration:00:31:47

A City’s Step Toward Reparations

7/12/2021
For decades, the granting of racial reparations in the United States appeared to be a political nonstarter. But Evanston, Ill., recently became the first city to approve a program of reparations for its Black residents. How did this happen, and can it be replicated in other parts of the country? Guest: Megan Twohey, an investigative reporter for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show...

Duration:00:41:01

From The Sunday Read Archives: ‘Alone at Sea’

7/11/2021
For Aleksander Doba, pitting himself against the wide-open sea — storms, sunstroke, monotony, hunger and loneliness — was a way to feel alive in old age. Today, listen to the story of a man who paddled toward the existential crisis that is life and crossed the Atlantic alone in a kayak. Three times. Mr. Doba died on Feb. 22 on the summit of Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania, Africa. He was 74. This story was written by Elizabeth Weil and recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from...

Duration:00:43:13

The Assassination of Haiti’s President

7/9/2021
Early on Wednesday morning, a group of men killed President Jovenel Moïse of Haiti in his residence on the outskirts of the capital, Port-au-Prince. It was a brazen act. Very rarely is a nation’s leader killed in at home. What does the attack means for Haiti’s future? Guest: Maria Abi-Habib, bureau chief for Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on...

Duration:00:32:10

The End of America’s 20-Year War

7/8/2021
After a 20-year war, the United States has effectively ended its operations in Afghanistan with little fanfare. In recent weeks, the Americans have quietly vacated their sprawling military bases in the nation, and without giving Afghan security forces prior notice. What does this withdrawal look like on the ground? Guest: Thomas Gibbons-Neff, a correspondent in the Kabul bureau for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at...

Duration:00:32:48

'Some Hope Is Better Than Having No Hope'

7/7/2021
When the F.D.A. approved the drug Aduhelm, the first Alzheimer’s treatment to receive the agency’s endorsement in almost two decades, it gave hope to many. But the decision was contentious; some experts say there’s not enough evidence that the treatment can address cognitive symptoms. What is the story behind this new drug? Guest: Pam Belluck, a health and science writer for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the...

Duration:00:38:52

The Rise of Delta

7/6/2021
The Delta variant of the coronavirus is threatening to put the world in an entirely new stage of the pandemic. The variant is spreading fast, particularly in places with low vaccination rates — it is thought to be around 50 percent more transmissible than previous versions. What can be done to stop Delta, and how will the variant hamper global efforts to return to normalcy? Guest: Carl Zimmer, a science writer and author of the “Matter” column for The New York Times. Sign up here to get...

Duration:00:23:51

The Debate Over Critical Race Theory

7/2/2021
In Loudoun County, Va., a fierce debate has been raging for months inside normally sleepy school board meetings. At the heart of this anger is critical race theory, a once obscure academic framework for understanding racism in the United States. How, exactly, did critical race theory enter American public life, and what does this debate look like on the ground? Guest: Trip Gabriel, a national correspondent for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning....

Duration:00:33:28

A New Era in College Sports

7/1/2021
Throughout its 115-year history, the N.C.A.A.’s bedrock principle has been that student-athletes should be amateurs and not allowed to profit off their fame. This week, after years of agitation and legislation, the rule was changed. What will this new era of college sports look like? Guest: Alan Blinder, a reporter covering college sports for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come...

Duration:00:32:40

Inside the U.F.O. Report

6/30/2021
Recently, the government released a long-awaited report: a look at unexplained aerial phenomena. We explore the report and what implications it may have. Will it do anything to quell theories of extraterrestrial visitors? Guest: Julian E. Barnes, a national security reporter for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter. Background...

Duration:00:29:32

The Collapse of Champlain Towers

6/29/2021
A few years ago, engineers sounded alarm bells about Champlain Towers, a residential building in Surfside, Fla. Last week, disaster struck and the towers collapsed. At least 11 residents have been confirmed dead and 150 more are still unaccounted for. What caused the building to fail, and why are so many people still missing? Guest: Patricia Mazzei, the Miami bureau chief for The New York Times. Sign up here to get The Daily in your inbox each morning. And for an exclusive look at how the...

Duration:00:29:20