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Up First

NPR

NPR's Up First is the news you need to start your day. The three biggest stories of the day, with reporting and analysis from NPR News — in 10 minutes. Available weekdays by 6 a.m. ET, with hosts Rachel Martin, Noel King, David Greene and Steve Inskeep. Now available on Saturdays by 8 a.m. ET, with hosts Lulu Garcia-Navarro and Scott Simon. Subscribe and listen, then support your local NPR station at donate.npr.org.

NPR's Up First is the news you need to start your day. The three biggest stories of the day, with reporting and analysis from NPR News — in 10 minutes. Available weekdays by 6 a.m. ET, with hosts Rachel Martin, Noel King, David Greene and Steve Inskeep. Now available on Saturdays by 8 a.m. ET, with hosts Lulu Garcia-Navarro and Scott Simon. Subscribe and listen, then support your local NPR station at donate.npr.org.

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United States

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NPR

Description:

NPR's Up First is the news you need to start your day. The three biggest stories of the day, with reporting and analysis from NPR News — in 10 minutes. Available weekdays by 6 a.m. ET, with hosts Rachel Martin, Noel King, David Greene and Steve Inskeep. Now available on Saturdays by 8 a.m. ET, with hosts Lulu Garcia-Navarro and Scott Simon. Subscribe and listen, then support your local NPR station at donate.npr.org.

Language:

English


Episodes

Thursday, May 28, 2020

5/28/2020
COVID-19, the highly infectious viral disease that has been spreading across the globe, has taken more than 100,000 American lives. Also, the rift between the U.S. and China is growing as the U.S. State Department says they no longer consider Hong Kong to have significant autonomy under Chinese rule. And, violent protests broke out in Minneapolis and other parts of Minnesota overnight in response to the death of George Floyd, a black man who died in police custody.

Duration:00:12:54

Wednesday, May 27, 2020

5/27/2020
Protests erupted and now four Minneapolis police officers have been fired after the death of George Floyd, a black man who died while in police custody. Also, Twitter adding fact-check warnings to two tweets by President Trump in which he claimed without evidence that mail-in voting was fraudulent. And, an NPR investigation found that some communities of color in Texas don't have as much access to coronavirus testing as white communities.

Duration:00:13:23

Tuesday, May 26, 2020

5/26/2020
The unemployment benefit meant to keep many afloat during the pandemic is set to expire at the end of July and lawmakers need to decide what to do next. Also, the pandemic poses challenges to voting in the upcoming presidential election. And, many public schools are facing financial meltdown due to state budget cuts caused by the coronavirus outbreak.

Duration:00:12:18

Monday, May 25, 2020

5/25/2020
The U.S. has banned travel from Brazil after a surge in coronavirus cases there. Also, protests sparked on Sunday in response to China's plans to tighten its control over Hong Kong through security legislation. And, a federal judge has ruled that a Florida state law that would have required felons to pay any outstanding court fees and fines before they can register to vote is unconstitutional.

Duration:00:13:49

BONUS: How One Woman Inspired The Design For The N95 Mask

5/24/2020
The N95 respirator has become one of the most coveted items in the world, especially by medical professionals. But how did this seemingly simple mask become the lifesaving tool it is today? In this bonus episode of NPR's history podcast, Throughline, we follow the curious history of one of the most important defenses in our fight against COVID-19.

Duration:00:41:41

Saturday, May 23, 2020

5/23/2020
Alabama is reopening despite a shortage of intensive care beds in Montgomery. A surge in demand for antibody tests runs the risk of giving people and employers a false sense of security. As Beijing tightens its grip, Hong Kong reacts.

Duration:00:13:49

Friday, May 22, 2020

5/22/2020
Beijing has signaled it will push through sweeping national security legislation for Hong Kong, its most aggressive effort yet to exert its control over the semi-autonomous city. Also, the Centers for Disease Control has new recommendations for colleges and universities preparing to welcome back students during the coronavirus pandemic. And, legal proceedings have come to a virtual standstill at the U.S. military court and prison at Guantánamo Bay due to the pandemic. So what happens now?

Duration:00:13:04

Thursday, May 21, 2020

5/21/2020
A Columbia University analysis estimates that tens of thousands of U.S. deaths could have been prevented with earlier lockdowns. Also, new coronavirus data shows declines in new cases of the virus, hospitalizations and deaths across all but a few areas of the United States. So what about the cities where cases have merely plateaued? And, Syrian officials who fled the nation's civil war are on trial in Germany, charged with war crimes.

Duration:00:13:08

Wednesday, May 20, 2020

5/20/2020
How quickly can the U.S. economy rebound from the coronavirus shutdown? And, with traffic dramatically down in recent months, the U.S. is in the middle of an accidental experiment showing what happens to air pollution when millions of people stop driving. Also, a massive cyclone in the Bay of Bengal poses deadly risks in a vulnerable part of the world.

Duration:00:13:20

Tuesday, May 19, 2020

5/19/2020
President Trump and his health secretary say the World Health Organization failed in its response to the COVID-19 pandemic and threatened to permanently end U.S. funding. Also, the president says he has been taking hydroxychloroquine and zinc to protect against the coronavirus. And, a Senate committee will question Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell about the first wave of coronavirus aid.

Duration:00:13:00

Monday, May 18, 2020

5/18/2020
The World Health Organization annual oversight meeting kicks off today amid the coronavirus pandemic that has swept the globe. Also, some of the biggest automakers are starting up their assembly lines again. What safety measures are they taking? And, Florida's two biggest counties are re-opening non-essential businesses even as the state is seeing new coronavirus cases trending up.

Duration:00:12:52

BONUS: Hotel Corona

5/17/2020
As Israelis were in isolation, under lockdown, 180 patients in one COVID-19 ward were eating, dancing and laughing together across religious lines. Welcome to the Hotel Corona. In this bonus episode brought to you by NPR's international podcast Rough Translation, host Gregory Warner takes you to Jerusalem to tell a story that follows familiar conversations into unfamiliar territory.

Duration:00:35:05

Saturday, May 16, 2020

5/16/2020
President Trump fired Inspector General State Department Inspector General Steve Linick, some states find a list of COVID testing labs provided by the White House largely unhelpful, and after a nine week lock down, Italy re-opens.

Duration:00:13:49

Friday, May 15, 2020

5/15/2020
The Trump administration put the onus on reopening to states, but city and county governments aren't always willing to abide by state rules. The Food and Drug Administration raises concerns about the reliability of a speedy coronavirus test touted by President Trump. And, Sen. Richard Burr will step aside from his role as chair of the Senate Intelligence Committee Friday, pending an FBI investigation into possible insider trading.

Duration:00:13:22

Thursday, May 14, 2020

5/14/2020
Rick Bright, a federal scientist who says he was ousted from his job overseeing vaccine development, testifies before a House subcommittee about coronavirus warnings he says went ignored by the Trump administration. Wisconsin's Supreme Court overturns the state's stay-at-home order. And, how severe is the COVID-19 situation in Mexico?

Duration:00:13:44

Wednesday, May 13, 2020

5/13/2020
The Chinese city of Wuhan is planning to test all 11 million residents in the coming days after six new COVID-19 cases surfaced, weeks after the city began relaxing its lockdown. New Kaiser Family Foundation data crunches the numbers on how many Americans are estimated to have lost health insurance during the pandemic. And, how did the U.S. end up with a shortage of medical supplies such as swabs at a time when they're desperately needed for coronavirus testing?

Duration:00:13:15

Tuesday, May 12, 2020

5/12/2020
Dr. Anthony Fauci will be among four Trump administration officials testifying before a Senate committee today on whether to reopen the economy. Will he issue another warning? Oral arguments begin at the Supreme Court in three cases involving President Trump, with big implications for presidential powers. And, nursing homes have accounted for more than half of COVID-19 deaths in some states. Why have they been so vulnerable to the virus?

Duration:00:14:02

Monday, May 11, 2020

5/11/2020
After two White House staffers test positive for coronavirus, Trump administration witnesses preparing to testify before a Senate panel on reopening America will do so remotely this week. How are leaders in the rest of the U.K. reacting to British Prime Minister Boris Johnson's road map for exiting a lockdown? And, a for-profit college that received millions in coronavirus-related funding faces a new lawsuit and allegations that the college was a sham.

Duration:00:13:14

BONUS: Where Did This Coronavirus Originate? Virus Hunters Find Genetic Clues In Bats

5/10/2020
Bats harbor some of the toughest known zoonotic diseases, and are the likely origin for the coronavirus. Emily Kwong and Maddie Sofia of NPR's daily science podcast, Short Wave, bring us this bonus episode of Up First.

Duration:00:13:00

Saturday, May 9, 2020

5/9/2020
Hundreds rallied in Georgia after arrests were made in the killing of an unarmed black man. As the country opens up, officials worry about a second coronavirus surge. In Corvallis, Ore., researchers are going door to door to test people for the coronavirus.

Duration:00:13:11