Here & Now Anytime-logo

Here & Now Anytime

WBUR

The news you need to know today — and the stories that will stick with you tomorrow. Plus, special series and behind-the-scenes extras from Here & Now hosts Robin Young, Scott Tong and Deepa Fernandes with help from Producer Chris Bentley and the team at NPR and WBUR.

Location:

Boston, MA

Networks:

WBUR

NPR

Description:

The news you need to know today — and the stories that will stick with you tomorrow. Plus, special series and behind-the-scenes extras from Here & Now hosts Robin Young, Scott Tong and Deepa Fernandes with help from Producer Chris Bentley and the team at NPR and WBUR.

Twitter:

@hereandnow

Language:

English

Contact:

1111 North Capitol St NE Washington, DC 20002 (617) 358-0397


Episodes

Carrying a pregnancy to term after denied abortion: Mayron Hollis' story

2/21/2024
I. Glenn Cohen talks about the medical ethics questions raised by the Alabama Supreme Court's ruling that frozen embryos are people. And, American Society of Civil Engineers' Darren Olson explains the state of our water systems and how the Biden administration's new investment could help. Then, after the overturn of Roe v. Wade, Mayron Hollis was denied an abortion in Tennessee. ProPublica's Stacy Kranitz and Kavitha Surana share Hollis' story. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy

Duration:00:24:42

Native Americans built AZ's first irrigation canals. Now they're going solar

2/20/2024
The Texas Newsroom's Julián Aguilar talks about a new military base underway in Texas along the border. And, the Gila River Indian Community is installing solar panels over an irrigation canal. Here & Now's Peter O'Dowd reports on the project's impact. Then, RealClear Pennsylvania's Charles McElwee explains why some Latino voters in the state are leaning Republican this year. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy

Duration:00:24:39

Principals weigh in on school cell phone policies

2/19/2024
Russian-American journalist Masha Gessen discusses Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny's legacy. And, Courthouse News' Erik Uebelacker recaps the civil corruption trial against the NRA and former CEO Wayne LaPierre. Then, two high school principals talk about their different approaches to cellphone policies in their schools. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy

Duration:00:30:05

How Grateful Dead archivist David Lemieux finds gems in live shows

2/16/2024
The Washington Post's Mary Ilyushina joins us to discuss the death of Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny. And, NPR's Ron Elving and NBC's Scott Wong talk about Vice President Kamala Harris' strong defense of NATO and condemnation of Russia. Then, archivist David Lemieux shares his experience listening to thousands of hours of live Grateful Dead shows searching for gems. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy

Duration:00:32:01

Flight attendants strike: Union president on contract talks

2/15/2024
The Washington Post's Arelis Hernandez explores why the number of migrant crossings at the U.S.-Mexico border dropped by 50% in January. And, Sara Nelson, president of the Association of Flight Attendants, discusses contract negotiations after Alaska Airlines flight attendants voted to authorize a strike. Then, we reconnect with a Palestinian-American translator who got his family out of Gaza and into Cairo, Egypt. Plus, historian Wafa Ghnaim talks about tatreez, a traditional Palestinian embroidery art form. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy

Duration:00:28:05

United CEO explains airline's plan to reach net-zero emissions by 2050

2/14/2024
United Airlines CEO Scott Kirby talks about the airline's plan to be net-zero by 2050. And, Grist's Jake Bittle explores the environmental impact of liquefied natural gas. Then, WBUR's Andrea Shea reports on why Valentine's Day was about being sour and salty in the Victorian era. Plus, Berkley editorial director Cindy Hwang talks about trends in the romance novel genre. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy

Duration:00:28:04

Israeli soldier's mother calls for ceasefire

2/13/2024
NPR's Greg Myre joins us to talk about ceasefire negotiations and deteriorating conditions in Gaza. And, Michal Brody-Bareket talks about a group of Israeli mothers with sons fighting in the war who are calling for ceasefire. Then, author Gene Luen Yang and illustrator Leuyen Pham discuss their new graphic novel "Lunar New Year Love Story." Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy

Duration:00:25:09

Meet BYD: The Chinese electric car company beating Tesla

2/12/2024
Inside Election's Nathan Gonzales talks about former Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan's unexpected entry into the Senate race. And, automotive expert Tu Le talks about how Chinese electric vehicle manufacturer BYD has overtaken Tesla in sales of electric cars. Then, Zach Woods and Brandon Gardner talk about their new satire series "In the Know," which parodies NPR. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy

Duration:00:24:57

Super Bowl: Chiefs and 49ers will be on the TV. What will be on your table?

2/9/2024
Fox News's Chad Pergram and Nevada Independent's Jon Ralston join us to talk about Trump's win in Nevada and the decision not to charge Biden with mishandling of documents. And, University of Baltimore professor Kim Wehle joins us to break down Supreme Court justices' skepticism over the case to ban former President Donald Trump from the Colorado ballot. Then, The Ringer's Lindsay Jones explains what's at stake for the Kansas City Chiefs and the San Francisco 49ers on Super Bowl Sunday. Our resident chef Kathy Gunst also shares recipes for Super Bowl snack favorites including ribs and artichoke dip. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy

Duration:00:30:18

Housing Secretary Marcia Fudge is confronting a 'racist' system

2/8/2024
The New York Times Magazine Emily Bazelon talks about the Supreme Court hearing arguments over whether Trump can stay on Colorado's primary ballot. And, U.S. Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Marcia Fudge talks about addressing a gap in Black homeownership amid a jump in homelessness. Then, we hear from a Palestinian man in California, who got stuck there when the war broke out. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy

Duration:00:23:17

Faulty sleep apnea machines were a nightmare for users. Now they're off the market

2/7/2024
Strategists Alice Stewart and Bill Press join us to talk about the latest political news. And, NPR's Domenico Montanaro joins us to talk about the new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll that found immigration is a key issue for voters. Then, ProPublica's Debbie Cenziper has been investigating faulty sleep apnea machines for years. She joins us to talk about the recall of devices linked to cancer, respiratory disease and death. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy

Duration:00:29:35

When war broke out, one displaced Gazan moved her bakery to a tent

2/6/2024
Former U.S. attorney Barbara McQuade talks about the expected decision on allegations against Georgia District Attorney Fani Willis related to the election interference case against former President Donald Trump. And, STAT's Lev Facher talks about the first major update to methadone treatment regulations for more than two decades. Then, with bakeries closed in Gaza due to the scarcity of electricity and flour, 26-year-old Nisreen Shehade has been baking bread for her family and other displaced Gazans in a tent. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy

Duration:00:24:16

Why do so many evangelicals support Donald Trump?

2/5/2024
KUNR's Lucia Starbuck joins us to talk about the primary and caucus coming up this week in Nevada. Nevada voter Zoila Sanchez weighs in too. And, The Atlantic's Tim Alberta discusses his new book about and personal experiences in an evangelical community that overwhelmingly supports former President Donald Trump. Then, filmmaker Matt Moyer talks about his latest documentary "Inheritance," which follows generations of poverty and addiction in one family from Appalachian Ohio. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy

Duration:00:33:40

Tenn. laws denied Allie Phillips an abortion. Now she's running for office

2/2/2024
South Carolina voters Rev. Leo Woodberry and ex-Democrat Chris Saley talk about the first Democratic primary taking place on Saturday. And, Allie Phillips discusses her campaign for a seat in the Tennessee House of Representatives and how the state's abortion restrictions impacted her. Then, singer Darius Rucker talks about his Hollywood Walk of Fame star, country album "Carolyn's Boy, and upcoming summer with Hootie & the Blowfish. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy

Duration:00:32:38

Todd Minor's son died from a TikTok trend. Now he's pushing for social media safety

2/1/2024
Semafor's Joseph Zeballos-Roig joins us to talk about a House bill expanding business and child tax credits. And, business analyst Jill Schlesinger joins us to break down the changes taxpayers may encounter this filing season. Then, Todd Minor, whose son died as a result of a TikTok challenge, shares his experience fighting to address safety on social media platforms at a recent Senate hearing. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy

Duration:00:28:35

How schools are using AI — and what students think about it

1/31/2024
CBS's Camilo Montoya-Galvez and the Washington Post's Arelis Hernandez talk about what lawmakers are proposing to do to stop a huge wave of immigration and how people at the southern border feel about those measures. And, Juliette Touma, director of communications for the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees, joins us to discuss what the pause in funding by the U.S. and other nations means for Palestinians in Gaza and the allegations against 12 of the agency's employees accused of participating in the Oct. 7 attack by Hamas. Then, the use of artificial intelligence technology in schools is on the rise. Chalkbeat's Michael Elsen-Rooney explains how teachers are utilizing this technology in classrooms. And two high school seniors share their thoughts on AI helping them understand assignments. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy

Duration:00:30:46

Lack of paid leave is a systemic issue for working parents

1/30/2024
Illinois lawmakers proposed a food additive ban that would eliminate substances such as titanium dioxide. Food policy writer Helena Bottemiller Evich joins us to discuss. And, the baby clothing brand Kyte Baby has faced backlash on social media for not accommodating an employee's request to work remotely while her newborn was in intensive care. It's indicative of a larger issue around lack of paid leave in the U.S. Dawn Huckelbridge, the founding director of the nonprofit "Paid Leave for All," joins us. Then, Ohio State University professor César Cuauhtémoc García Hernández joins us to talk about his new book "Welcome the Wretched: In Defense of the 'Criminal Alien,'" which explores the history of U.S. immigration policy. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy

Duration:00:26:16

Gender pay gap persists, 15 years after Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act

1/29/2024
Human rights attorney Noura Erakat for her thoughts following the International Court of Justice's preliminary ruling on South Africa's genocide case against Israel. And, Brian Katulis, senior fellow and vice president of policy at the Middle East Institute, talks about what the U.S. response to the Iranian-backed militia attack could mean for the wider conflict in the Middle East. Then, new data analysis indicates that voters under 30 hold increasingly polarized political views depending on their gender. Young women have moved sharply to the left in the past decade, while young men tilted more conservative. The Atlantic's Derek Thompson discusses the implications. Plus, 15 years ago, former President Barack Obama signed the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act into law to bolster strengthened worker protections against pay discrimination. Equal pay activist Lilly Ledbetter and the National Women's Law Center Fatima Goss Graves, talk about how pay transparency laws and other policies can help close the gender pay gap. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy

Duration:00:32:17

Jamie Oliver's new cookbook uses simple ingredients to make delicious meals

1/26/2024
As former President Donald Trump moves closer to securing the GOP nomination after winning the New Hampshire primary, Senators are reconsidering an emerging bipartisan deal to stop the flow of migrants into the country. NPR's Ron Elving and Politico's Eugene Daniels join us. And, Mexico is suing American gun manufacturers. Julian Aguilar, breaking news reporter and producer for The Texas Newsroom, joins us to explain why. Then, chef, restauranteur and cookbook author Jamie Oliver's new cookbook is called "5 Ingredients Mediterranean." In it, Oliver shows readers how to use limited ingredients to make simple, delicious meals. He joins us to talk about the book. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy

Duration:00:31:18

The consequences of jailing parents over kids' truancy

1/25/2024
The Dana Farber Cancer Institute, affiliated with the Harvard Medical School, has been accused of publishing studies that contain data manipulation. STAT's Angus Chen tells us more. And, more than three months after the start of the war, the question remains: what is next for Gaza? Khaled Elgindy, senior fellow and director of the program on Palestine and Palestinian-Israeli Affairs at the Middle East Institute, shares some perspective. Then, in some states a child's truancy results in parents — often single mothers — being prosecuted and jailed. Johns Hopkins University School of Education professor Robert Balfanz talks about the criminalization of absenteeism and the consequences for students and parents. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy

Duration:00:30:52