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Woman's Hour

Women

Women's voices and women's lives - topical conversations to inform, challenge and inspire.

Location:

United States

Description:

Women's voices and women's lives - topical conversations to inform, challenge and inspire.

Language:

English


Episodes

Tracey Crouch MP, Marina Litvinenko, Author Kiley Reid

2/20/2024
Former government minister Tracey Crouch has joined the list of MPs who’ve said they won’t be standing at the next general election. She won the former Labour seat of Chatham and Aylesford in 2010 and has turned it into a healthy majority of more than 18,000 for the Conservatives. A self confessed 'sports nut', in 2015 she attained her dream job as sports minister and oversaw the government’s football governance review. In 2018 she resigned in protest at the government’s 'unjustifiable' refusal to speed up plans to curb controversial fixed odds betting terminals. Four years ago as the pandemic hit, she was diagnosed with breast cancer, and following treatment went on to raise £153,000 for cancer charities. She joins Emma Barnett to talk about her decision to leave politics and her plans for the future. Yulia Navalnaya, the widow of Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny who was announced dead in a Russian prison last week, has directly accused the Kremlin of poisoning and killing him and has vowed to continue his fight to change Russia. Someone who has been following this story intently is Marina Litvinenko, the widow of Alexander Litvinenko, who exposed corruption in Russia and died in a London hospital in 2006 after ingesting tea which contained radioactive polonium. The European Court of Human Rights found Russia was responsible for the killing of Mr Litvinenko in 2021. Marina joins Emma. Can you have a true friendship or relationship if one of you has more money than the other? Novelist Kiley Reid dominated bestseller lists with her debut, Such A Fun Age, which skewered white liberal guilt. Her new book, Come And Get It, returns to themes of race, class, and above all money. Set on a campus in southern America, it follows students and academics whose behaviour is shaped by money. Kiley joins Emma in studio. Women get more gain from exercise than men. That's the suggestion of a new study of 400,000 people. 140 minutes of moderate exercise a week reduced women's risk of premature death from any cause by 18% compared with being inactive. Men needed 300 minutes of exercise for a similar gain. Joining Emma to discuss is Baz Moffat, former Team GB rower and co-founder of The Well, an organisation that works to challenge the status quo for women in health, fitness and sport.

Duration:00:57:18

Aisling Bea, Profile of Yulia Navalnaya, Carmen Smith, Wellness v stoicism

2/19/2024
The comedy and acting star Aisling Bea grew up in County Kildare in Ireland and in 2011 became the first woman for 20 years to win the prestigious stand-up competition So You Think You’re Funny? Her Bafta-winning sitcom This Way Up firmly established her as a presence to be reckoned with on our TV screens- last year she played the lead in the film based on Take That’s music, Greatest Days, and she regularly pops up on US TV and movies. She joins Emma Barnett to discuss her latest show, Alice and Jack, which has just begun on Channel 4. Following the death of Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny, we look at the role of his wife, Yulia Navalnaya, and whether she might become the new face of the opposition. Yulia is due to speak with European foreign ministers in Brussels today. To discuss, Emma is joined by the Spectator's Russia correspondent, Owen Matthews, who was Bureau Chief for Newsweek in Moscow for more than a decade, and Sarah Rainsford, BBC Eastern Europe Correspondent who was expelled from Russia after many years, and is now based in Warsaw. Carmen Smith is 27 and set to become the youngest peer in the House of Lords. Carmen will replace Plaid Cymru’s only member of the Lords, Dafydd Wigley (the Rt, Hon Lord Wigley) who is retiring aged 80, and was a previously leader of Plaid. Carmen will be known as Baroness Smith of Llanfaes, the village where she grew up. She joins Emma to talk about the challenges ahead, the reaction to her selection and why she wants to join a body she believes should be abolished. Can Ancient Greek theories revolutionise our modern day lives? Australian author Brigid Delaney seems to think so. She talks to Emma about swapping wellness for stoicism, alongside classicist Professor Edith Hall. Presenter: Emma Barnett Produced by: Louise Corley Studio engineer: Steve Greenwood

Duration:00:57:11

Lorraine Kelly, Paralympian Lauren Rowles, Chief Constable Sarah Crew

2/17/2024
Lorraine Kelly CBE has been described as the queen of morning television. Now after a lifetime of wanting to, she has written her first novel, The Island Swimmer, a story of family secrets, island communities and overcoming fear. Lorraine joins Anita Rani to discuss her novel, her life and her 40-year career. It’s been almost 40 years since most UK coal miners went on strike over pit closures and proposed redundancies. It was one of the most divisive conflicts of a generation – but what role did women play? And how did it change things for them? Nuala McGovern is joined by two women who were there at the time – Lisa McKenzie and Heather Wood – to share their experiences. Violence and abuse against shop workers rose to 1,300 incidents a day last year. That’s according to new figures from the British Retail Consortium. Nuala hears from Michele Whitehead, a workplace rep for the Union of Shop, Distributive and Allied Workers, on what it’s like for her. Four years ago, Avon and Somerset Police offered Channel 4 unprecedented access to its Counter Corruption Unit, the people who police the police. Emma Barnett speaks to their Chief Constable, the first woman to hold the post, about why she made the decision to let the cameras in, and the consequences of doing so. Lauren Rowles is a two-time Paralympic Gold, World and European champion rower, who was on the Woman’s Hour Power List of Women in Sport. This summer she’s hoping to break a record at the Paris Paralympics – she tells Nuala about that, and her work away from sport advocating for LGBTQ+ people and those struggling with their mental health. Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Lottie Garton

Duration:00:56:47

Lorraine Kelly, Actor and boxer Kali Reis, Presenter Gemma Cairney

2/16/2024
Lorraine Kelly CBE has been described as the queen of morning television. She joined TV-am as their Scottish correspondent in 1984 and, save for a brief maternity leave 30 years ago, has barely left the schedules since - for the last 14 as host of ITV’s Lorraine. Now after a lifetime of wanting to, she has written her first novel, The Island Swimmer, a story of family secrets, island communities and overcoming fear. Lorraine joins Anita Rani to discuss her novel, her life and her 40-year career. The deaths of three women in one week, all allegedly murdered by their husbands, has caused outrage in Somalia and sparked days of protests over the country’s femicide rates. Police have named the suspects in all three killings, which took place in the first week of February, as the dead women’s husbands. Two of the victims were pregnant. The BBC's Fardowsa Hanshi, a video journalist with the Somali Service explains what's going on. Kali Reis is the breakout star of True Detective: Night Country. As the series nears its finale on Sky Atlantic on Monday, Kali joins Anita in the Woman’s Hour studio to talk about going from a career in boxing to acting with Jodie Foster. She is also an indigenous rights activist, who has Native American and African heritage, and was the first indigenous woman fighter to become a World Champion. Last month, Woman's Hour discussed a shocking report which warned of endemic misogyny and discrimination in the music industry. MPs from the Women and Equalities Committee found that sexual harassment and abuse is common. That report has resonated with many – and not just in the music industry. Award-winning broadcaster Gemma Cairney has written a piece in The Guardian about her experience, saying she’d battled racism and misogyny in creative industries for years. Gemma tells us about the reaction to her piece. Professor of Media, Culture and Communications at Brunel University Sarita Malik will explain why Gemma’s experience is so widespread in broadcasting. Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Kirsty Starkey Studio Manager: Neva Missirian

Duration:00:57:51

Rain Newton-Smith, Paralympian Lauren Rowles, Homelessness

2/15/2024
In April last year, The Guardian exposed allegations of rape, sexual assault and harassment at the Confederation of British Industry (CBI). Rain Newton-Smith took over as Chief Executive and pledged to reform the culture of the organisation. As she approaches a year in the job, Rain speaks to Nuala McGovern about what progress has been made. She also gives her reaction to the news that the UK fell into recession in December 2023. It’s been nearly a year since we announced the Woman’s Hour Power List, celebrating incredible women in the world of sport. Today we are joined by one of those who placed on the list ahead of her attempt to break a record at this summer's Paris Paralympics. The two-time Paralympic Gold, World and European champion British rower Lauren Rowles is training hard for what she hopes will be her third Paralympic Gold and joins Nuala to discuss her glittering career and her work away from sport advocating for LGBTQ+ people and those struggling with their mental health. Lorna Tucker ran away from home at the age of 14 and ended up living on the streets of Soho in London. Now a filmmaker, her latest release, Someone’s Daughter, Someone’s Son, has forced her to revisit life on the streets, both from her own perspective and those currently sleeping rough. Writer Helen Russell moved to Denmark a decade ago and wrote a bestselling book, The Year of Living Danishly. Several books and three children later, she has now turned her attention to the parenting culture of Denmark and other Nordic nations. Her new book is How to Raise a Viking: The Secrets of Parenting the World's Happiest Children. Presenter: Nuala McGovern Producer: Lucy Wai

Duration:00:57:47

Surviving cancer five times, Government's independent rape advisor, Miners’ strike 40 years on, My Life with the Walter Boys

2/14/2024
Violence and abuse against shop workers rose to 1,300 incidents a day last year, up by 50% in the year to September 2023. That's according to new figures by the British Retail Consortium. Nuala hears from Michele Whitehead, a workplace rep for USDAW who has worked at a convenience store in Wolverhampton for 20 years. Dr Natalie Yates-Bolton is 57 and has survived cancer five times. The senior lecturer in nursing was first diagnosed at the age of 22 whilst still at university. She's had 11 operations, 30 sessions of chemotherapy and 55 rounds of radiotherapy. Natalie joins Nuala McGovern to discuss what’s helped her get through three decades of cancer care. Professor Katrin Hohl is the new independent advisor to the Government on rape. She joins Nuala to discuss her new role, and her priorities for change. Forty years ago next month most of the coal miners in the UK went on strike over pit closures and proposed redundancies. The strike lasted a year and was one of the most divisive conflicts of a generation. On Sunday, BBC Two is broadcasting Miners’ Strike: A frontline Line Story, which features personal testimony from men and women on the frontline of the strike. Nuala’s joined by two women who were there at the time to discuss their experiences: Lisa McKenzie appears in the film and was a teenager when her dad was on the picket lines and Heather Wood was also very active in the strike. My Life with the Walter Boys is a teen drama on Netflix that hit 12 million views in it’s first week alone. It was adapted from a book written by Ali Novak when she was just 15 years old. She joins Nuala to talk about the transformation of her book to a hit series along with the executive producer who adapted the story, Melanie Halsall. Presenter: Nuala McGovern Producer: Dianne McGregor

Duration:00:57:38

Joanne Froggatt and Dr Rachel Clarke, Minette Batters, NFU, Israel/Gaza war

2/13/2024
A forthcoming three-part ITV drama Breathtaking, set in a fictionalised London hospital, tells the devastating impact of the Covid-19 pandemic through the eyes of Acute Medical Consultant Dr Abbey Henderson. The series is based on Dr Rachel Clarke’s book of the same name. She worked on Covid wards and is also one of the writers on the series. Dr Henderson is played by Joanne Froggatt, known for many roles including Downton Abbey, Sherwood and Angela Black. They join Emma Barnett to discuss. The "orange peel theory" is as trend where one person in a couple will ask their partner to peel an orange for them. As Valentine's Day approaches, what are the small gestures that mean so much? The ways you show your love? Minette Batters is standing down as President of the National Farmers' Union after six years of leading the organisation. She joins Emma to talk about her tenure leading the farming world, and what it felt like to be the first woman to do so. We've been looking at the experiences of women from both Israel and Gaza on the programme this week, asking what are the main issues facing women on each side as the war continues in to its fifth month. Today Emma speaks to Ayelet Razin Bet Or the Legal Adviser to the Association of Rape Crisis Centres in Israel. Ayelet has been travelling the world in recent months highlighting the horrific evidence of rape, sexual violence and mutilation of women during the October 7 brutal attacks by Hamas that killed 1,200 people and says she feels hugely let down and even betrayed by the response she has seen, particularly from other women. She also talks about her concerns for the 14 female hostages still being held by Hamas. To listen to our discussion about women in Gaza, please head to BBC Sounds to find it in yesterday's episode. Presented by Emma Barnett Producer: Louise Corley Studio Engineer: Giles Aspen

Duration:00:57:45

Bryony Gordon, Israel-Gaza war, Chief Constable Sarah Crew

2/12/2024
Four years ago, Avon and Somerset Police offered Channel 4 unprecedented access to its Counter Corruption Unit, the people who police the police. The result is a three-part documentary series called To Catch A Copper. Emma Barnett speaks to Sarah Crew, Chief Constable of Avon and Somerset Police, about why she made the decision to let the cameras in, and the consequences of doing so. Bryony Gordon is the bestselling author of The Wrong Knickers, You Got This and Mad Girl. She won the MIND Making a Difference Award for changing the perception of mental health in the media, and even ran the London Marathon in her underwear! She joins Emma to discuss binge eating, OCD, menopause and her new book - Mad Woman. As the Israel-Gaza war enters its fifth month, we’re looking at what the impact is on women and children. Tomorrow, Emma will hear from women in Israel. Today, she speaks to BBC Arabic journalist Dalia Haidar and Frances Leach from ActionAid to hear more about what life is like at the moment for Palestinian women and children in Gaza. The three-time Olympic champion Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce has confirmed she will retire this year after the games in Paris. The 37-year-old, regarded as one of the greatest sprinters of all time, won the 100m title in 2008 and 2012. Former Team GB sprinter Katherine Merry joins Emma to discuss the announcement. Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Lottie Garton

Duration:00:57:46

Weekend Woman’s Hour: Rhianon Bragg, Businesswoman and entrepreneur Emma Grede, Amelia Earhart’s legacy

2/10/2024
Rhianon Bragg was held hostage at gunpoint by her ex-boyfriend, Gareth Wyn Jones, for eight hours. He was sentenced in 2020 for stalking, false imprisonment, making threats to kill and possession of a firearm. Now, despite a parole board panel saying they are not satisfied it would be safe, he is being released from prison. Rhianon tells us about how her relationship with Wyn Jones developed, what happened at the end, and how she feels about him coming out of prison. Ambika Mod stars as Emma in the new Netflix adaptation of David Nicholls’ much-loved novel One Day. She acts opposite Leo Woodall as Dex, and their comedic romance plays out over 14 episodes and 20 years. You may have seen Ambika as Shruti, the junior doctor with a pivotal plot line in the BBC labour ward drama This is Going to Hurt. She tells us about taking on this lead role. On Thursday Kate Garraway returned to Good Morning Britain following the death of her husband, Derek. She spoke about her reaction to being called a widow for the first time, by a delivery man, apologising for her loss. We hear from Poorna Bell, a journalist and author who lost her husband in 2015, and Karen Sutton, host of The Widow Podcast, who became a trained grief coach after her husband died in 2016. New sonar images from deep in the Pacific Ocean might have located the wreckage of Amelia Earhart’s missing plane. Has Earhart’s disappearance finally been solved, or has the obsession with this mystery distracted us from the pioneering woman herself? Pilot Katherine Moloney and historian Dr Darren Reid discuss Amelia Earhart, her legacy, and women in aviation today. Emma Grede, a native East Londoner, now a thriving businesswoman in the US, is known for her entrepreneurial prowess and successful collaborations with the Kardashian sisters. Emma is a driving force behind iconic brands like Good American and Skims. She will soon be making her mark as a guest investor on an upcoming episode of BBC’s Dragon's Den. Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed

Duration:00:55:40

TikTok sleuths, Widows, Politicising Taylor Swift, Surgery critics 'silenced'

2/9/2024
Yesterday, Kate Garraway returned to Good Morning Britain following the loss of her husband, Derek. She spoke about her reaction to being called a widow for the first time, by a delivery man, apologising for her loss. Anita Rani speaks to Poorna Bell, a journalist and author who lost her husband in 2015, and Karen Sutton, host of The Widow Podcast, who became a trained grief coach after her husband passed away in 2016. Anita Rani talks to a woman who says a cosmetic surgery clinic tried to silence her after she reported concerns about her eye operation. Signature clinic is taking five people in total to court after they posted negative reviews or comments on support groups. A judge has thrown out an attempt to get a gagging order against one of them. BBC reporter Melanie Abbott speaks to the woman concerned. And that woman's solicitor tells Anita what she thinks this judgement means for free speech. A trend is surfacing on social media, where women reach out to one another with a request - Can you find out if my partner is cheating on me? Anita speaks to Becky Hayes from The Laura and Becky Show podcast, who is creating social media content out of these requests and a journalist who has researched the subject, Beth Ashley, for a discussion on the morality of social media investigators. Although payments are not taken for these requests and identities are kept secret, some might ask whether it’s appropriate to make humorous content, out of what could possibly be very devastating news for someone. And without the context of the relationship to inform them, whether the trend invade people’s privacy. Fans are eagerly waiting to see if Taylor Swift will make it from Tokyo to Las Vegas in time to support her American footballer boyfriend Travis Kelce at the US Super Bowl this Sunday. Many in the Trump camp are watching closely too, as right-wing conspiracy theories run wild that the pop megastar might use the event to influence the presidential elections. What is going on? Anita talks to BBC reporter Holly Honderich, based in Washington. Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Rebecca Myatt Studio manager: Emma Harth

Duration:00:57:34

Vapes, Phoebe Dynevor and Amelia Earhart's legacy

2/8/2024
A BBC investigation has uncovered evidence that vapes are being used to groom children into sexual or criminal exploitation. Last week, the Prime Minister announced that disposable vapes are set to be banned as part of plans to tackle the rising number of young people taking up vaping - measures will also be introduced to prevent vapes being marketed at children and to target under-age sales. However, there are concerns that banning the sale of vapes will encourage children to seek them elsewhere. Emma Barnett is joined by the BBC’s Hayley Hassall and the Children’s Commissioner for England Dame Rachel de Souza. Apparently, if you’re a middle-aged couple and your sex life has faded away you may be experiencing the “couplepause”. The therapist and writer Lucy Cavendish joins Emma to explain what this is and how to get the spark back. Actor Phoebe Dynevor, best known as Daphne Bridgerton in the Netflix blockbuster series, joins Emma in the studio. Her most recent role, as an ambitious hedge fund manager in the film Fair Play, has earned her a nomination for the EE Rising Star award at this year’s Baftas. New sonar images from deep in the Pacific Ocean might have located the wreckage of Amelia Earhart’s missing plane. Has Earhart’s disappearance finally been solved, or has the obsession with this mystery distracted us from the pioneering woman herself? Pilot Katherine Moloney and historian Dr Darren Reid discuss Amelia Earhart, her legacy, and women in aviation today. Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Emma Pearce

Duration:00:57:35

Businesswoman and entrepreneur Emma Grede, Crystal Hefner, Social media algorithms and misogyny

2/7/2024
Emma Grede, a native East Londoner, now a thriving businesswoman in the US, is known for her entrepreneurial prowess and successful collaborations with the Kardashian sisters. Emma is a driving force behind iconic brands like Good American and Skims. She will soon be making her mark as a guest investor on an upcoming episode of BBC’s Dragons' Den, and she joins Emma to explain how she's learned more from her business failures, and what she looks for in a potential investment. The Welsh government has intervened in the running of the fire service in South Wales - after a toxic culture of misogyny and sexual harassment was uncovered during a review. In what's been called an unprecedented move, four Government-appointed commissioners have been brought in to restructure management. Emma speaks to Hannah Blythyn, Deputy Minister for social partnership and Member of the Senedd. Crystal Hefner, spent almost ten years of her life inside the Playboy Mansion after meeting founder and editor of Playboy magazine - Hugh Hefner - when she was 21. She became one of his infamous ‘girlfriends’ before marrying him, travelled the world and attended lavish parties. She has now written a book, Only Say Good Things: Surviving Playboy and Finding Myself, in which she provides an insight into her time spent at the mansion and her experiences of beauty standards and objectification. New research suggests social media algorithms prioritise serving harmful and misogynistic content to young people – with a fourfold increase across just five days shown to the study’s test personas. How do we keep young people safe online – particularly on social media sites? Emma discusses this issue with the report author, Dr Kaitlyn Regehr and Will Gardner from online safety organisation Childnet. Presented by Emma Barnett Producer: Louise Corley Studio Engineer: Steve Greenwood

Duration:00:57:31

Rhianon Bragg, Women of Substance, ultramarathon runner Allie Bailey

2/6/2024
Rhianon Bragg was held hostage at gunpoint by her ex-boyfriend, Gareth Wyn Jones, for eight hours. He was sentenced in 2020 for stalking, false imprisonment, making threats to kill and possession of a firearm. Now, despite a parole board panel saying they are not satisfied it would be safe, he is being released from prison. Rhianon speaks to Emma about how her relationship with Wyn Jones developed, what happened at the end, and how she feels about him coming out of prison. The Prime Minister has upset some people by seeming to take a bet with TalkTV presenter Piers Morgan over his Rwanda policy. Rishi Sunak told presenter Rachel Burden on BBC 5 Live that he wanted to show his commitment to his immigration policy. Rachel joins Emma to discuss what the bet tells us, alongside Isabel Hardman, Assistant Editor at the Spectator. Ultrarunner Allie Bailey is the first woman to have run the length of the Panama Canal and she’s completed more than 200 marathons and almost 80 ultramarathons. She joins Emma to talk about her new book “There is No Wall” which details how she was doing a lot of her running at the height of her struggles with alcoholism, depression and mental breakdowns. What can women artists’ work tell us about their addictions? Sally Marlow is a Professor of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience at King’s College London. She’s been looking at five women artists for a BBC Radio 3 series, Women of Substance, to find out what their work can tell us about their addictions. She joins Emma to discuss researching Billie Holiday in particular, and what the lyrics of Billie's songs reveal about alcohol use in women. Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Lottie Garton

Duration:00:57:21

Ambika Mod, Forgiveness, Grandparent classes, Grammys

2/5/2024
Ambika Mod stars as Emma in the new Netflix adaptation of David Nicholls’ much-loved novel One Day. She acts opposite Leo Woodall as Dex, and their comedic romance plays out over 14 episodes and 20 years. You may have seen Ambika as Shruti, the junior doctor with a pivotal plot line in the BBC labour ward drama This is Going to Hurt. She joins Anita Rani in the Woman’s Hour studio to talk about now taking the lead. A new programme on Radio 4, Forgiveness: Stories from the Front Line, explores how you survive and restore your life, when something truly appalling is done to you. Anita is joined by the founder of the Forgiveness Project, Marina Cantacuzino and Marian Partington, whose sister Lucy was murdered by Fred and Rosemary West in 1973. Grandparent antenatal classes give grandparents-to-be the chance to brush up on practical skills and get key advice on how to look after young kids again. Anita talks to Dr Francesca Dooley, founder of Happy Parents Happy Baby where she runs grandparent classes, and Francesca’s mother Beverly Bonora who was in her first ever class. Taylor Swift has made history at the Grammys by winning album of the year for a fourth time. Billie Elish, SZA and Miley Cyrus also took home major awards. Even Jay-Z got in on the act, calling out the fact that his wife Beyonce has never won album of the year. Anita discusses with Jude Rogers, arts and culture journalist for the Guardian and Observer and Tschepo Mokoena, freelance culture writer and author of Beyonce, Lives of Musicians.

Duration:00:56:20

Weekend Woman’s Hour: Candace Bushnell, Lisa St Aubin de Terán, Ideological Gender Gap

2/3/2024
The creator of Sex and the City, Candace Bushnell, whose column in the New York Observer was the inspiration behind the TV series, joins Anita in the studio. The real-life Carrie Bradshaw is bringing her one-woman show about creating the hit series to the West End and then doing a UK tour. After 20 years of silence, prize-winning author Lisa St Aubin de Terán is back with a new book. Aged 16, Lisa married a Venezuelan landowner-turned-bank robber; she eventually ran away from him with her young daughter only to end up trapped in a castle with the Scottish poet George MacBeth. From there she eloped to Italy and in 2004 she settled in north Mozambique, establishing the Teran Foundation to develop community tourism. She lived there until 2022 when a cyclone took the roof off her house, and returned to London with a bag full of manuscripts including her memoir, Better Broken than New. She joins Emma in studio. A new study says that an ideological gap has opened up between young men and women in countries on every continent. These increasingly different world views could have far-reaching consequences. One of the leading researchers in gender studies Dr Alice Evans, Senior Lecturer in the Social Science of Development at King’s College London tells Emma why Gen Z is two generations, not one. Emma also speaks to Professor Rosie Campbell, Director of the Global Institute for Women's Leadership at King's College London. Emma talks to the TV presenter Kaye Adams about her 10-year battle with HMRC over their claim she owed almost £125,000 in unpaid taxes. Best known for her role on the Loose Women panel show, she also hosts the morning show on BBC Radio Scotland. She says the protracted legal case has left her feeling “utterly, utterly beat up and gaslit”, despite her vindication. From cute cat memes to plush toys, a new exhibition at Somerset House explores the power of cuteness in contemporary culture. But is buying into a cute aesthetic regressive or even sexist, or can cute be reclaimed as a form of protest? And how would you feel, as a grown woman, about being labelled 'cute' or 'adorable'? To discuss, Emma is joined by Dr Isabel Galleymore, a consultant on the Cute exhibition; and the journalist Vicky Spratt. Have you ever thought about where your name came from? Perhaps you were named after a favourite relative, a character in a movie or maybe your parents just liked the sound of it. Photographer Deirdre Brennan wanted to mark the 1500th anniversary of Saint Brigid, one of the patron saints of Ireland. To do this, she photographed Brigids all over Ireland and asked them how they felt about their name. She joins Emma to discuss the project - as does one of the Brigids involved in her project - Brigid McDonnell, a sheep farmer from County Antrim, Northern Ireland.

Duration:00:57:31

Candace Bushnell, No Queens in Europe, Early Years recruitment

2/2/2024
Anita Rani speaks to Roopam Carroll, who recently sold her nursery business, and Ellen Broome, Head of Family and Childcare at the charity CORAM. Since the abdication of Queen Margarethe II of Denmark, there are no Queens in Europe. This is the first time this has happened since Queen Isabella of Spain was crowned in 1833. Will this make a difference in Europe? What difference have previous Queens in Europe made? Royal commentator Caroline Aston and journalist Emily Andrews join Anita to discuss. The creator of Sex and the City, Candace Bushnell, whose column in the New York Observer was the inspiration behind the TV series, joins Anita in the studio. The real-life Carrie Bradshaw is bringing her one-woman show about creating the hit series to the West End and then doing a UK tour. Presenter: Anita Rani Producer: Lottie Garton

Duration:00:57:16

Kaye Adams, Chemical attack, Gender gap, Saint Brigid

2/1/2024
Nine people have been injured after a man threw a 'corrosive substance' over a mother and her two girls in Clapham, south London, yesterday evening. The family, three responding police offices and three other people who tried to help were taken to hospital after the attack. Witnesses described a "horrific" scene. Police are searching for the subject. Emma Barnett spoke to a solicitor Ayesha Nayyar, who has previously represented victims of acid crime. Emma talks to the TV presenter Kaye Adams about her 10-year battle with HMRC over their claim she owed almost £125,000 in unpaid taxes. Best known for her role on the Loose Women panel show, she also hosts the morning show on BBC Radio Scotland. She says the protracted legal case has left her feeling “utterly, utterly beat up and gaslit”, despite her vindication. A new study says that an ideological gap has opened up between young men and women in countries on every continent. These increasingly different world views could have far-reaching consequences. One of the leading researchers in gender studies Dr Alice Evans, Senior Lecturer in the Social Science of Development at King’s College London tells Emma why Gen Z is two generations, not one. Emma also speaks to Professor Rosie Campbell, Director of the Global Institute for Women's Leadership at King's College London. Have you ever thought about where your name came from? Perhaps you were named after a favourite relative, a character in a movie or maybe your parents just liked the sound of it. Photographer Deirdre Brennan wanted to mark the 1500th anniversary of Saint Brigid, one of the patron saints of Ireland. To do this, she photographed Brigids all over Ireland and asked them how they felt about their name. She joins Emma to discuss the project - as does one of the Brigids involved in her project - Brigid McDonnell, a sheep farmer from County Antrim, Northern Ireland. Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Rebecca Myatt Studio manager: Steve Greenwood

Duration:00:57:31

Arlene Foster, french women and high heels

1/31/2024
Former Northern Ireland First Minister and DUP leader Arlene Foster joins the programme to talk about a return to devolution in Northern Ireland and the fourth anniversary of Brexit. Author Fiona Williams is out with her debut novel, The House of Broken Bricks. She joins Emma to talk about the ways in which the book relates to her real life in terms of navigating issues of race and belonging, and why she wanted to write a story so intertwined with nature. Thames Valley Police has referred itself to the policing regulator after a BBC investigation revealed that officers ridiculed an assault victim while watching body-worn video that showed her groin. Emma speaks with the BBC's Noel Titheradge about his investigation as well as Harriet Wistrich about misogyny in the UK police force. It’s out with heels and in with trainers. That’s what is happening in France where, according to a poll, women are falling out of love with high heels - instead going for a chunky boot or comfortable trainer. To discuss this fashion shift, Emma is joined by Professor of Fashion History Dr Serena Dyer and French shoe designer Marie Laffont. Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Cece Armstrong Studio Manager: Duncan Hannant

Duration:00:57:24

Misogyny in the music industry, author Lisa St Aubin de Terán, cervical smears

1/30/2024
A new report comes out today by the Women and Equalities Select Committee about the serious problems faced by women in the music industry. To tell Emma Barnett what's in it is the Chair of the Women and Equalities Committee and Conservative MP Caroline Nokes. Emma also gets the reaction of academic and business research consultant Vick Bain. Sky Sports presenter Jo Wilson has been gracing our screens since 2011, but what you might not have known is that Jo has also lived with Stage 3C cervical cancer. After a difficult birth experience in 2020, she was reluctant to book a smear test, but convinced herself to do it 19 months later leading to her diagnosis. Her treatment was successful, and she is now speaking out about her personal experience in a bid to encourage women to take up their smear tests. NHS data shows that almost a third of women in England did not attend their test last year. Emma speaks to Jo and to Theresa Freeman-Wang, consultant gynaecologist and clinical advisor to Jo’s Trust. After 20 years of silence, prize-winning author Lisa St Aubin de Terán is back with a new book. Aged 16, Lisa married a Venezuelan landowner-turned-bank robber; she eventually ran away from him with her young daughter only to end up trapped in a castle with the Scottish poet George MacBeth. From there she eloped to Italy and in 2004 she settled in north Mozambique, establishing the Teran Foundation to develop community tourism. She lived there until 2022 when a cyclone took the roof off her house, and returned to London with a bag full of manuscripts including her memoir, Better Broken than New. She joins Emma in studio. Last week we spoke about the record low birth rate in China as the country struggles to revert effects of the decades long one-child-policy. Today, we turn our attention to Japan. The population of the world’s third biggest economy has been declining for 16 years. An ageing workforce, combined with the country's strict immigration control, has, among other things, led to significant labour shortages. Could women be Japan’s hidden asset? Emma speaks to Moeka Iida, The Economist’s reporter and researcher in Tokyo.

Duration:00:57:05

Fasting and women, Conscription, Cuteness exhibition

1/29/2024
Following the speech last week by the head of the British Armed Forces calling for a new ‘citizen army’, we look at what this could look like and what role women would play. Emma Barnett speaks to former RAF Group Captain Kathleen Sherit the author of Women on the Front Line, and to Diane Allen, a retired Army Lieutenant Colonel. It's been reported that the Prime Minister Rishi Sunak fasts for 36 hours at the start of each week. He is said to stop eating by 5pm on a Sunday and doesn't permit himself to touch food again until 5am on a Tuesday, and allows himself to drink only black coffee and water. It is said that he has followed this practice for years. Emma is joined by Dr Saira Hameed to discuss fasting and how men and women should approach it differently. Amy and Anu are identical twins, but just after they were born, they were taken from their mother and sold to separate families. Years later they connected online and realised they were among thousands of babies in Georgia stolen from hospitals and sold, some as recently as 2005. Emma speaks to one of the twins, Amy Khvitia, and also Fay Nurse, a BBC journalist behind a new documentary, Georgia’s Stolen Children. From cute cat memes to plush toys, a new exhibition at Somerset House explores the power of cuteness in contemporary culture. But is buying into a cute aesthetic regressive or even sexist, or can cute be reclaimed as a form of protest? And how would you feel, as a grown woman, about being labelled 'cute' or 'adorable'? To discuss, Emma is joined by Dr Isabel Galleymore, a consultant on the Cute exhibition; and the journalist Vicky Spratt. Presenter: Emma Barnett Producer: Emma Pearce

Duration:00:57:24