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With Good Reason

Arts & Culture

Each week on With Good Reason we explore a world of ideas with leading scholars in literature, history, science, philosophy, and the arts. With Good Reason is created by Virginia Humanities and the Virginia Higher Education Broadcasting Consortium.

Location:

Charlottesville, VA

Description:

Each week on With Good Reason we explore a world of ideas with leading scholars in literature, history, science, philosophy, and the arts. With Good Reason is created by Virginia Humanities and the Virginia Higher Education Broadcasting Consortium.

Language:

English

Contact:

145 Ednam Drive, Charlottesville, VA 1 877 451 5098


Episodes
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Drugging France

5/16/2024
In the 19th century, French doctors were finally on the cusp of treating pain. It was a new horizon in the history of medicine. Sara Black says they were experimenting with all kinds of mind-altering drugs… on themselves. And: Greg Wrenn’s journey to forgiving his parents through a psychedelic rainforest tea called ayahuasca. Also: If you’ve had a cable TV subscription in the last 20 years, chances are you’ve seen at least an episode or two of Crime Scene Investigation. Tracy Sohoni looks at how CSI depicts drugs and violence over the course of its 15 seasons. Later in the show: Sabrina Laroussi studies books about the world of Latin American drug trafficking called narconovelas. She says this emerging genre of literature tends to glorify drug lords and downplay the brutality of drug war violence. Plus: Whether through a family member, friend, or even our own personal struggles - we’ve all been touched by addiction. But Regina Brisgone says addiction isn’t a one-size-fits-all disease, women experience it differently than men.

Duration:00:52:00

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Taking Care of Moms

5/9/2024
Before the covid-19 pandemic, there were clearly cracks in the healthcare system for maternity and postpartum care. But during the pandemic, those cracks became much more visible. Patricia Kinser and Sara Moyer were driven to create quick change for new birthing parents, and so the Thrive guide was born. The Thrive Guide is a bit like a birth plan, but for after the baby is born. And: As of January 2024, twelve states, including Virginia and Washington DC, have implemented Medicaid coverage for doula care. DaShaunda Taylor is researching how access to doulas affects the health of new moms and babies. Later in the show: In Japan women who don’t have kids–either by choice or not–are a hot topic. Kimiko Tanaka explores Japanese womens’ choices about and experiences of motherhood. Plus: Giving birth is always a trauma for the body. But sometimes the experience leaves emotional trauma, as well. Elizabeth Johnson-Young is trying to understand what causes birth trauma and how people respond to its aftermath.

Duration:00:52:00

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Presenting: Crosswinds

5/2/2024
Hampton Roads is home to the largest coal export operation in the United States. Crosswinds, a podcast from the University of Virginia’s Repair Lab, follows the efforts of Lathaniel Kirts and his friend and collaborator Malcolm Jones, as they seek environmental justice for decades of coal dust that they, and their community, inhaled. Crosswinds is produced by Adrian Wood. Later in the show: People want to breathe better air in Hampton Roads, Virginia. How Kim Fields and the Repair Lab are working with community members to seek environmental justice for the decades of coal dust that they’ve inhaled. Plus: The success of citizen science according to Mike Shell.

Duration:00:52:00

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United We Stand: In Our Words

4/25/2024
Teenagers have long turned to books for a guide on how to live, but for kids of immigrant parents, those guides can be particularly important. Addie Tsai’s first novel was a YA book that wrestled with many of the same complex issues they faced as a kid. And: SJ Sindu says that everything she writes is translated through the lens of her experience as an immigrant, a refugee, and a queer person. Those perspectives come out in the outsider characters from her YA graphic novel Shakti and her new short story collection, The Goth House Experiment. Later in the show: Majo Delgadillo immigrated from Mexico to the U.S. as an adult and these days, she writes in both English and Spanish. Majo says that because she comes to English as an immigrant, it still feels a bit weird and that gives her English stories permission to be a bit weird themselves. Plus: Most immigrants are deeply familiar with the challenge of translation, but Yuemin He takes on the extra challenge of translating poetry.

Duration:00:52:00

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Mapping Climate History

4/18/2024
Last year, thick smoke from Canadian wildfires wafted down and blanketed a broad swath of the East Coast - from New York to North Carolina. The wildfire smoke had us East Coasters feeling like the apocalypse had arrived. But fires aren’t always doom and gloom. Stockton Maxwell says they can actually be restorative for forests. And: Coral reefs are one of the most beautiful ecosystems of the natural world. But they’re more than just a feast for the eyes. Pamela Grothe says coral reefs offer a map to the past, helping researchers track climate history over many hundreds of years. Later in the show: By now most of us know about the harsh reality of sea-level rise. But you’ve probably never heard of groundwater overuse. Manoochehr Shirzaie says it’s causing US coastal land to sink at an alarming rate - in some places close to 20 inches per year! Plus: The Equity Center at the University of Virginia helps empower communities to tackle climate injustice. Barbara Brown Wilson is a co-founder of the Equity Center. She shares some of her favorite projects across Virginia - from heat islands in Charlottesville to coastal flooding on the Eastern Shore.

Duration:00:52:00

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New Brownies

4/11/2024
In the midst of the Harlem Renaissance, W.E.B. DuBois wanted children to have something to read. Something that was speaking to them. So he started The Brownies’ Book, a monthly periodical for “children of the sun.” One hundred years later, sociologist Dr. Karida Brown and visual artist Charly Palmer bring us The New Brownies. And: Why Brenton Boyd says that Black Americans and Carribeans have already coped with the rapture. Later in the show: What William Grant Still and Undine Smith Moore’s early 20th century compositions tell us about then and now, according to Bianca Jackson.

Duration:00:52:00

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United We Stand: The People's Tongue

4/4/2024
Who decides what makes a language? In countries all over the world, there are official organizations with that job–in France, Croatia, India, Denmark, Nigeria, Mexico. But Ilan Stavans reminds us that in the United States, the people decide our language. And: Katrina Powell shares the expected immigrant narrative and the ways in which writers are constantly resisting and countering that expected story. Later in the show: Cristina Stanciu author of The Makings and Unmakings of Americans, argues that it’s worth looking at turn of the century immigrant narratives alongside another group–Native Americans–who were also trying to prove their case as Americans in the public sphere. Plus: In the U.S., Hispanic neighborhoods sit at an intersection of American and Latin identities. Christina Rodriguez says these barrios play a big part in Latinx literature, but you’ve got to walk their streets to know how.

Duration:00:52:00

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REPLAY: I've Endured

3/28/2024
While Beyonce's Texas Hold 'Em spreads country music joy, we bring you this music-rich episode on women who have rocked the ole time country music scene. Rene Rodgers and Toni Doman (Birthplace of Country Music Museum) give us a taste of women musicians from Dolly Parton and Loretta Lynn, to Rhiannon Giddens, Cathy Fink, and Amythyst Kiah. Later in the show: Virginia Folklife mentor artist Elizabeth LaPrelle is keeping the centuries old tradition of Appalachian ballad singing alive. Plus: Nationally renowned guitar and ukulele maker Jayne Henderson describes the art and joy of crafting these prized instruments.

Duration:00:52:00

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Moving Forward By Looking Back

3/22/2024
When Latorial Faison meets somebody, she can almost immediately tell if they attended a Black school during segregation. She says they carry themselves with a special sense of pride. It’s actually what set her on her journey to writing her book, The Missed Education of the Negro: An Examination of the Black Segregated Education Experience in Southampton County, Virginia 1950-1970. And: Franklin County, Virginia once boasted a whopping 177 schools. Most were tiny one room buildings built by local communities in the first half of the 20th century. Benny Gibson and his son, Abe Gibson, have been consulting old maps and knocking on doors to recover what they call the Vanishing Schools of Franklin County. Later in the show: Brittany Hunt studies anti-indigenous schooling practices. She says teachers often focus too much on the traumatic past of indigenous people, while failing to bring their story into the modern context. Plus: The US invaded the Dominican Republic in 1916 and installed a military government to oversee the occupation for eight years. Alexa Rodriguez says Dominicans used public schools during this period to express their own version of national identity and citizenship.

Duration:00:52:00

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Spring Break

3/14/2024
About 80% of Americans have visited Disney World in Florida. Marc Williams says that Disney World has both shaped and been shaped by American identity. And: Anita Zatori sees an increase in young people choosing vacation destinations not to be there, but to create content of themselves being there. Later in the show: From guiding tours in Bangkok to operating a Thai restaurant in Sydney, Australia, Cherry Brewer knows all about tourism. She's bringing her expertise to the university’s new hospitality and tourism management curriculum. Plus: After being singled out in a group of peers while traveling abroad, Shaniel Bernard Simpson began wondering what solo women travelers were experiencing.

Duration:00:52:00

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United We Stand: Telling Our Story

3/8/2024
Enya Cid moved from Mexico to the U.S. as a three year old. She says this country is her home, but her right to stay here never feels certain. In 2022, Enya joined other first generation immigrants in a writing workshop hosted by the publisher Restless Books and Arlington, Virginia’s Dream Project. Enya shares her story along with Nataly Montano, who immigrated to the U.S. from Bolivia. Their teacher, playwright Isaiah Stavchansky, explains how the writing workshop empowers immigrants as Americans. Later in the show: Workshop participants Karen Vallejos Corrales, Cecilia Morales, and Hareth Andrade Ayala share their stories of immigrating to this country and read some of their written work.

Duration:00:52:00

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Mere Difference

2/29/2024
Living with a disability can be hard. But it doesn’t have to lead to a life less lived. Elizabeth Barnes says her own diagnosis made her confront the reality of finding the unexpected joys in disability. And: Many parents of young deaf children don’t have access to learn sign language. Carrie Humphrey and Colin Wells say this can put deaf kids at a disadvantage and delay their development. Carrie and Colin both work as full-time faculty in the American Sign Language and Interpreter Education program at Reynolds Community College. Carrie was named an Outstanding Faculty member by The State Council of Higher Education for Virginia. Later in the show: In 2007, Susan Ghiaciuc was diagnosed with MS. After she told her university employer, she was promptly greeted with a mound of paperwork and probing questions. Now she’s working to help improve the disclosure process for professors across Virginia. Plus: Traditional ways of teaching don't always work for every student. That’s what prompted Laurie Cubbison to look for alternatives. She says Universal Design for Learning better serves students with a diverse array of learning needs.

Duration:00:52:00

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REPLAY: Life Without Boundaries

2/22/2024
19th and 20th century poet, Alice Meynell–a.k.a. “the penciling mama”--described motherhood as “life without boundaries.” Cristina Richieri Griffin discusses the Victorian mother of eight’s complicated feelings on mothering. And: The 2003 Haitian novel, The Infamous Rosalie, tells the stories of generations of women who are enslaved on a plantation. Ima Hicks explores how for these women, mothering was a particularly complicated act. Later in the show: Camilla Morrison believes that a costume design can explore existential ideas like what it means to be a woman and how women grapple with motherhood. Plus: In recent years, experiences of postpartum depression that used to be whispered about are now shouted on tik tok and instagram. Marion Young has studied maternal depression and shares one way it changes how mothers parent.

Duration:00:52:00

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Selfish

2/16/2024
Imagine if everyday you went to work and pretended to be someone else. That’s life for professional actors. Robyn Berg says self care is essential for acting professionals to stay themselves while pretending to be other people. And: Self care can get conflated with selfishness. Peter Thaxter started thinking about that after a student interviewed him about selfishness. Now, he’s clear on why self care and selfishness are not the same. Later in the show: Our childhood affects who we become. And Adrian Bravo has found that in seven countries, childhood trauma has nurtured alcohol dependency in adulthood. Plus: All sexes deal with PTSD. But Timothy Jarome has found that a certain protein in women’s brain makes them experience PTSD differently.

Duration:00:52:00

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Let's Talk About Love, Baby

2/8/2024
Valentine’s Day today means candy hearts and stuffed bears. But Kat Tracy says the origins of the holiday are far from cute and fuzzy–and they don’t have a whole lot to do with St. Valentine. And: A safe and secure relationship seems like an obvious goal, but it’s surprisingly hard to achieve. Amber Pope shares how attachment theory and strong support networks can help people thrive in a safe and secure partnership. Later in the show: A thriving intimate relationship starts long before the meet-cute. Dayna Henry says early, comprehensive, age-appropriate sex education makes for happier, healthier relationships later in life. Plus: True love – is it in the head or the heart? Or the gut? No, this is not about your microbiome determining your love life. Instead, Lindsey Hicks wants to talk about what our gut reactions say about how our relationships are really going.

Duration:00:52:00

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REPLAY: Expanding Our Origin Story

2/1/2024
Cauline Yates was at a family reunion the first time she heard she was a descendant of Thomas Jefferson. She later helped develop the Memorial to Enslaved Laborers at the University of Virginia. And: Clint Smith is the author of the award-winning book, How the Word is Passed: A Reckoning with the History of Slavery Across America. He traveled to 9 historic sites to understand how slavery is remembered and taught. Later in the Show: Gayle Jessup White was on a tour at Monticello when she raised her hand and told the guide she was related to Sally Hemings. She says that moment changed her life forever. Her memoir, Reclamation: Sally Hemings, Thomas Jefferson and a Descendant’s Search for Her Family’s Lasting Legacy, chronicles uncovering her family’s roots at Thomas Jefferson’s home. Plus: Descendants recently gained structural parity at James Madison’s plantation home, Montpelier. When this interview was originally recorded, James French represented the descendant community on Montpelier’s board.

Duration:00:52:00

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In The Wake of Sea Level Rise

1/25/2024
In 2011, Japan was rocked by a magnitude 9.1 earthquake. It triggered a tsunami that measured 130 feet high - killing around 18,000 people and causing untold damage. Tina Dura and Robert Weiss say sea level rise will now allow even weaker earthquakes to cause tsunamis with similar destruction. And: Sea level rise is also endangering white cedar trees. Rob Atkinson and Linda Manning run the Fear to Hope project, which gets high school students out in the field to help protect white cedar trees from extinction. Later in the show: Liesel Ritchie and Duane Gill have gone around the world, talking with people who’ve had their lives upended by oil spills. They say we process the emotional trauma of natural disasters differently than man-made disasters. Plus: Disasters often hit historically marginalized communities the hardest. Nakeina Douglas-Glenn is the Director of the Research Institute for Social Equality. She’s helping to ensure equitable outcomes for vulnerable communities impacted by disaster.

Duration:00:52:00

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The Next Pandemic

1/19/2024
Beverly Sher has been teaching her “Emerging Diseases” seminar since 1996. From AIDS in the 1990s, SARS in 2003, the H1N1 pandemic in 2009 and the modern COVID-19 pandemic, students realize what public health crises reveal about the psychology and sociology of a nation. And: Since it was first identified in the United States in 1975, Lyme disease has become the world’s most common disease to spread from animals to humans through the bite of infected ticks. The sooner it's treated, the better the possible outcome for the patient. This is good news. Except that current testing for Lyme disease takes weeks. Brandon Jutras and his team are working on a rapid, at-home Lyme detection test. Later in the show: COVID-19 isn’t over. Sara Reed Houser says that the proof is in the wastewater. Plus: You may or may not have been infected by a parasitic nematode in your life. Not to worry, though. It was just that ringworm in kindergarten. Why Mandy Kyle Gibson is deliberately introducing parasitic nematodes to an environment to help solve a problem.

Duration:00:52:00

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Digging In

1/11/2024
When we dig deep underground, we get a chance to dig deeper into history. Dennis Blanton wants to change the way we think about America’s beginnings. He’s studying the expedition of a Spanish conquistador who was the first European in many parts of the Southeast. And: At “The Cove” along the Staunton River in Virginia, Brian Bates and his students have uncovered nearly 10,000 items that paint a picture of a thousand year old Sappony Indians fishing camp. Later in the show: Along with tools, pottery, and human remains, prehistoric sites are filled with ancient bird bones. Tal Simmons says these bones tell us what ancient humans ate, worshiped, and perhaps how they hunted. A discovery of seven prehistoric bird bone whistles might be the world’s oldest duck call. Plus: Before a state road gets moved or expanded, a team of archeologists comes in to dig for historical “treasure”. Elizabeth Monroe talks about a massive pile of oyster shells she uncovered and what they tell us about the people who used to live in the area.

Duration:00:52:00

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REPLAY The Pets We Love

1/4/2024
In the earlier stages of the pandemic, when many people were still staying as close to home as possible, nearly 1 in 5 American households adopted a pet. Furry cats and snuggly dogs–and some temperamental pigs. Sherrie Clark is a veterinarian who treats and studies pet pigs. She says they make good pets–for the right family. And: Relationships between dogs and humans go back 10,000 years. Nancy Gee says that today relationships between people and pooches improve health outcomes for everyone with two or four legs. Later in the show: As a kid, Wynne DiGrassie was always bringing lizards and small snakes home in her pockets. After years focused on work as a horse veterinarian, Wynne has fallen back in love with reptiles. She talks about the common mistakes lizard and snake owners make and what it’s like inviting these slithery friends into your home. Plus: Cats rule the internet and they’ve been part of it from the beginning. Dylan Wittkower gets philosophical about why we can’t stop making and sharing cat memes.

Duration:00:52:00