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Business Daily

BBC

The daily drama of money and work from the BBC.

Location:

United Kingdom

Networks:

BBC

Description:

The daily drama of money and work from the BBC.

Language:

English


Episodes
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Social shopping: The battle for Gen Z

6/19/2024
The social shopping industry is estimated to reach around $8.5 trillion in global sales by 2030. So what are the big tech giants doing to win over a generation of teenagers hooked onto shopping on social media? We find out what makes shopping social and find out what happens when a country bans social shopping on the world’s fastest growing platform. We speak to Gen Z shoppers, social media experts and an Indonesian business owner who almost had to let his staff go after the government changed the law around selling on social media. Presented and produced by Sam Gruet (Image:Livestream seller Evo Syah. Image credit: Evo Syah)

Duration:00:17:29

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What's behind golf's gender pay gap?

6/18/2024
As prize money gaps between men and women begin to close in many sports, in golf, the pay disparity is still very large. Nelly Korda, winner of five consecutive tournaments, earned less than Scottie Scheffler, who won four. And although current and former players like Korda and Mel Reid have made strides in the game, there's a significant difference in the prize money they receive. A lot of the disparity has been linked to the level of investment in the game. The men’s game has seen major cash injections, such as the $2 billion from Saudi Arabia’s Public Investment Fund into LIV Golf. Sam Fenwick explores what could boost investment in the women’s game and asks current player Mel Reid and former player, Nancy Lopez, how the game can attract more funding and TV time. (Picture: A montage of Nelly Korda and Scottie Scheffler, swinging their golf clubs, against a background of a green. Credit: PA/USA Today Sports/BBC) Presented and produced by Sam Fenwick

Duration:00:17:30

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Rhodes: A ‘beacon’ for sustainable tourism?

6/17/2024
Summer tourism in the Mediterranean is not only already in full swing but set for another bumper season. In Rhodes, "the more the merrier” is the mantra on this famed Greek isle, which is economically reliant on tourism. But the growing influx of arrivals each year alongside increasing frequency and ferocity of the annual wildfire season is posing some hard questions for locals about the need for more environmentally-friendly forms of tourism. Now, an ambitious five-year programme is underway, aimed at transforming the fourth-largest Greek island into “a beacon for sustainable tourism.” We head to Rhodes to take a look at how it is progressing, how businesses are adapting, and the way tourists are responding. Presenter/producer: Victoria Craig (Photo: Anda Karayanni of the Irene Palace Hotel, Rhodes, tending to some plants. Credit: Victoria Craig/BBC)

Duration:00:17:28

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Is there too much tourism?

6/17/2024
When is tourism good tourism, and when is it just too much? Current projections suggest global travel is going to carry on rising for the foreseeable future, as low-cost air travel and budget rentals make package holidays ever more affordable for ever more people. But from Tenerife to Venice, more and more tourist destinations are feeling the pressure of these rising visitor numbers. In holiday hotspots, local people are complaining of congested streets, rising housing costs, and environmental degradation. And some have even taken to the streets to protest about the issue. So what’s to be done? (Image: Thousands of people demonstrate against tourism policies on the island of Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain in 2024) Presented and produced by Ed Butler

Duration:00:17:29

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Business Daily meets: Jane Poynter

6/13/2024
23 years ago, the US multi-millionaire Dennis Tito became the world’s first-ever space tourist, funding his own trip into orbit. There was clearly money to be made, and now the lure of making space tourism more accessible to the masses is even greater - with several private companies jockeying for position. Jane Poynter’s firm is among them. It’s an industry experiencing dramatic growth – but the price of any of these trips is out of reach of most of us. We explore whether this firm could achieve its aim of launching more of us into stratospheric heights. And we hear how Jane went on her own journey: from ecologist working in the famous Biosphere 2 experiment in the early 1990s, to looking skywards and the possibilities of a career in space tourism. Presenter: Ed Butler Producer: Amber Mehmood

Duration:00:17:29

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Why does everyone work late in Spain?

6/12/2024
The European country is known for its late night eating culture, the average time for an evening meal is past 9PM. One of the reasons for that is the working day across Spain which has a history of going on way into the evening. But recently the second deputy minister of Spain called this ‘madness’, saying eating so late and working late isn’t good for work-life balance. We speak to a restaurant owner and the CEO of digital agency that offers flexible working to talk about working culture and discuss how likely it is that Spain will change its habits. (Picture: Mikel López de Viñaspre, the co-founder and chief executive of the Sagardi Group of Basque restaurants. Credit: Sagardi Group) Presented and produced by Hannah Mullane

Duration:00:17:29

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Is there a penalty for being single?

6/11/2024
Why does being on your own seem so expensive? The number of unmarried, divorced, widowed or unattached people is growing worldwide. But figures suggest it is more financial costly to be single, while couples and families benefit from paying less per person. Whether it is the packaging supermarkets use, streaming service tariffs, hotel rooms - you often get a much better deal being coupled-up than not. Governments are in on the act too: offering tax breaks to couples. In this programme, we take apart the personal finances of singles; hearing from World Service listeners and financial analysts. Is it just economies of scale or are we really living in a world that penalises people on their own? And are there any financial advantages to being solo? (Picture: Senior woman looking concerned, paying bills at home on her laptop. Credit: Getty Images) Presented and produced by David Reid

Duration:00:17:29

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Economic life in Palau

6/10/2024
We look at how soaring food and fuel prices are affecting the tiny island nation in the western Pacific Ocean. Like much of the world, the Covid-19 pandemic and the war in Ukraine have led to supply chain issues, and rising costs. And with limited opportunities, young people are facing the question, should they stay or leave and chase careers elsewhere? Produced and presented by Frey Lindsay (Image: People gathered under the Japan-Palau Friendship bridge in Koror, Palau. Credit: Frey Lindsay/BBC)

Duration:00:17:28

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The fight over Palau's oceans

6/9/2024
We travel to the tiny pacific nation which wants to shrink its marine sanctuary, and open it up once more to commercial fishing. The President says it’s costing too much in lost revenue, when Palauans are already struggling. But opponents say this goes against Palau's conservationist ethos. So today we're asking - can conservation and commerce, co-exist? Produced and presented by Frey Lindsay (Image: The National Geographic Pristine Seas research vessel the Argo, in the Pacific Ocean East of Palau. Credit: Frey Lindsay)

Duration:00:17:37

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The weight-loss drug revolution

6/6/2024
Diabetes and obesity drugs like Ozempic, Wegovy and Mounjaro have become famous for helping users shed big amounts of weight. It's a market that could soon be worth more than $100 billion. Two companies dominate this space, Novo Nordisk which makes Ozempic and Eli Lilly, maker of Mounjaro. But with competitors desperate for a piece of the action, how long can these two giants stay in front? Leanna Byrne hears from some of the companies involved, including those at the centre of the action and those developing the next wave of treatments. Presented by Leanna Byrne and produced by Lexy O'Connor (Image: A box of the anti-obesity drug Wegovy, including injection pens. Credit: Getty Images)

Duration:00:17:28

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Denmark and the Novo Nordisk effect

6/5/2024
In the first of a two-part series, in collaboration with The Food Chain, we look at the impact of the success of weight-loss drug manufacturer Novo Nordisk on the small country of Denmark. The Scandinavian nation is where the company is based, and with a population of less than six million people, Novo is having an outsized impact on the economy there. Denmark is now publishing separate economic statistics, minus the pharmaceutical industry. One town in particular, Kalundborg, has seen huge change since the company set up its manufacturing facility there. We look at the impact on local business; hearing from the town's residents, who now have quite different economic prospects. Presented/producer: Adrienne Murray (Photo: The headquarters of Novo Nordisk in Denmark, viewed from above. Credit: Getty Images)

Duration:00:17:29

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What’s really going on in the US jobs market?

6/4/2024
President Biden has claimed the US economy is the ‘envy of the world’ and that his administration has added record job numbers, with around one million people hired since the turn of this year. With inflation falling and the possibility of the Federal Reserve cutting interest rates, we find out if the rosy economic picture is being felt by those who are hiring or trying to get hired. (Image: A sign on a wall recruiting for staff at a hotel in California in 2024 as a man walks by. Credit: Getty Images) Presented and produced by Matt Lines

Duration:00:17:28

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Why are so many young Indians struggling to get jobs?

6/4/2024
India has just finished its marathon elections and as the new government takes charge we take a look at one of its biggest challenges - rising youth unemployment. With an average age of 29 years, India’s population is one of the youngest globally, but job creation for them hasn’t been easy in this fast growing economy. The BBC’s Devina Gupta travels to Delhi to talks to students and first time job seekers about this growing job crisis and what can be done to solve it. Presenter and producer: Devina Gupta (Image: young men in Delhi waiting for the labour chow. Credit: Devina Gupta)

Duration:00:17:28

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A special interview with World Bank boss Ajay Banga

6/3/2024
Exactly one year into his new job, we meet Ajay Banga, the President of the World Bank. He previously ran Mastercard, but following President Biden's nomination, Ajay Banga took on one of the most important roles in finance in June 2023. He tells us what steps he is putting in place to reform the organisation, how western governments are struggling to fund it to the same levels that it used to, and he warns inflation might not come down much further. Presenter: Sam Fenwick Producer: Olie D'Albertanson (Photo: Ajay Banga. Credit: Getty Images)

Duration:00:17:27

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Business Daily meets: Paul Carrick Brunson

5/30/2024
We found out why the dating guru swapped a career in investment banking to become a matchmaker. Now famous for his role in the hit TV show ‘Married at First Sight’, Paul Carrick Brunson explains how his current career path wasn’t always written in the stars. But a combination of business acumen, the backing of his partner and a touch of luck led to a lucrative trade in matchmaking. He explains his core business principles and gives his top tips for discussing money in a relationship. (Image: Paul Carrick Brunson. Credit: Chris Bethell) Presenter: Devina Gupta Producer: Sam Clack

Duration:00:23:11

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The Baltimore bridge collapse – what happens next?

5/29/2024
It's been two months since the collapse of the key bridge in Baltimore, and the deadline to unblock the port's shipping channel is imminent. The US government has given a loose promise to make it happen by the end of May - but there are doubts that deadline will be met, causing more disruption to the local and global economy. How will businesses on sea and land find a way through more uncertainty? Izzy Greenfield speaks to small businesses who are feeling the impact; from fewer customers to disruption to supply chains. Baltimore used to rank first among US ports for autos and light trucks, handling a record 850,000 vehicles last year. Importantly, the port is where vehicles are processed and labelled to be sold domestically. We hear how the industry is seeing an immediate impact. And we learn about the struggles that transportation workers continue to face. (Image: Baltimore bridge after it collapsed in March 2024. Credit: Getty Images) Presented and produced by Izzy Greenfield

Duration:00:17:29

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Why is olive oil so expensive?

5/29/2024
Most of us have noticed the prices of our weekly food shopping going up over the last few years, but some items have risen by astronomical amounts. Extra virgin olive oil - a premium, unprocessed oil from the olive, has seen many customers' prices rise by 50% in the past year alone. We explain why, as we hear from oil sommeliers and the people who buy and sell the product. (Image: Olive oil being poured into a bowl. Credit: Getty Images) Presented and produced by Rick Kelsey

Duration:00:17:30

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Do women-only co-working spaces have a future?

5/27/2024
Female-only co-working spaces started to grow during the #metoo movement. But some have struggled. We speak to entrepreneurs who are running these spaces - and the women working in them. Are they a viable alternative to going to the office? (Picture: Oi Leng Lui, who founded the co-working space, The Hearth, in north London.) Presented and produced by Dougal Shaw

Duration:00:17:27

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Business Daily meets: Laura Chinchilla

5/23/2024
Laura Chinchilla was the first woman to serve as president of Costa Rica and one of the first in Latin America. We talk to her about what that journey to the top job in her country was like, and the challenges facing Latin America - from corruption to crime, the drugs trade, migration, the brain drain, poor governance and low economic productivity. And we consider some of the potential solutions to those problems - solutions that could help Latin America bring prosperity to its people. (Picture: Laura Chinchilla Miranda, former President of Costa Rica, speaking at a conference. Credit: Getty Images) Presented and produced by Gideon Long

Duration:00:17:29

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Latin America’s success stories

5/22/2024
Across the region, there are examples of economic success stories: countries, companies and people that are getting things right, transforming their local economies and bringing prosperity to the region. We go to Peru, where fruit producers are enjoying a blueberry boom. We hear from Uruguay, which generates almost all its electricity from renewable energy, and we visit a factory Mexico that’s benefiting from “nearshoring” and the country’s proximity to the United States. We talk to two female entrepreneurs – one from Chile and one from Colombia – on how the ecosystem for start-ups has evolved in their countries and the exciting possibilities the region has to offer. Produced and presented by Gideon Long (Image: Close-up on a worker loading baskets of blueberries on a truck at a plantation. Credit: Getty Images)

Duration:00:17:28