Born to Win Podcast - with Ronald L. Dart-logo

Born to Win Podcast - with Ronald L. Dart

Christian Talk

Born to Win's Daily Radio Broadcast and Weekly Sermon. A production of Christian Educational Ministries.

Location:

Whitehouse, TX

Description:

Born to Win's Daily Radio Broadcast and Weekly Sermon. A production of Christian Educational Ministries.

Language:

English

Contact:

Christian Educational Ministries P.O. Box 560 Whitehouse, TX 75791 903 839 9300


Episodes
Ask host to enable sharing for playback control

The Ten Commandments #11

5/30/2024
Did God create sexually-transmitted diseases as a trap for man? Is it a kind of punishment to man for having too much fun? Is that the whole idea—that God created man, and then in a mischievous moment, He said, I don’t think so. That doesn’t sound like the God you read about in the Bible. I think STDs are an example of what can happen when viral and bacteriological strains are given an indefinite life in which to mutate and change. I’m not an expert in this area at all, but your body is teaming with bacteria, right now. Try not to panic, most of them are harmless and some of them are even good for you. When we have sex with another person, we trade some bacteria with our partner every time and bacteria mutate in the lifetime of a man or a woman and they may change a bit, but the strains we exchange between one man and one woman won’t survive us. We will never hurt another human being because they won’t go beyond our family, and the chances are that if we started off clean, in the end, there still will not be a problem because the bacteria will not have had time to change beyond certain limits. However, if we add additional people to the mix and we give those strains of bacteria indefinite life, immortal life as it were, they can go on and on for 1,000 or 2,000 or 3,000 years or longer. If we allow the bacteria that kind of time to change and to mutate, all bets are off. Now I can’t tell you that’s how STDs originated, just take it as an analogy to what might have happened, in a realization that God didn’t create these things. Man, by his sins, created these things. Think about this, if we could somehow manage worldwide monogamy for a generation or two, we could wipe out all STDs, including AIDS. They would be gone, over, finished, disappeared. Now does that give us a message or not? So why blame God for it? It’s our problem. We created it. God told us how to avoid it. So why did God say, then,

Duration:00:28:03

Ask host to enable sharing for playback control

The Ten Commandments #10

5/29/2024
The defendant is 20 years old, but he looks more like 16. He is wearing blue jeans and a sweater and his hair is neatly cut. He looks for all the world like he should have books under his arm and be headed to class, but the district attorney says, cold-blooded killer It seems he held up a convenience store late one night. The clerk offered no resistance, gave him all the money in the cash register, and had his hands up. But as he scooped up the money and stuffed it into his pockets, this thief calmly raised his pistol and shot the clerk squarely between the eyes—just to leave no witnesses. Now, the district attorney wants you, the jury, to find him guilty and sentence him to death. How do you feel about that? Mind you now, he’s guilty. There’s no doubt whatsoever, much less a reasonable doubt. We have pictures of him on a security camera. Clearly he’s the guy who shot the clerk. We even have more evidence than that. Some of you would sentenced him to death in a heartbeat. Others would say, Of course, if you didn’t believe in the death penalty, you wouldn’t even be on this hypothetical jury, but the underlying question still remains, the Sixth Commandment is, Shall we, or shall we not, kill this boy for his crime? Where do we look for guidance on the question of the right and the wrong of killing someone? Can you appeal to social norms? Well, our society says that what the young man did was wrong and that he should die for it. The will of society is expressed in the law of the land. The problem with that is that the law of the land—the social norms in some nations—calls for the death of innocent people because of their race or their religion. Now, are we really prepared to say that society is the authority on this issue? Can we let society call this issue without guidance from someplace? You do understand, don’t you, that letting society call the shots is a prescription for genocide. I’ve heard people appeal to the fact that human life is sacred. But tell me, how can a high-school teacher explain that to kids saying that human life is sacred, when sacredness is a religious concept; it has to do with something that is holy?

Duration:00:28:03

Ask host to enable sharing for playback control

Saving the Truth

5/27/2024

Duration:00:28:04

Ask host to enable sharing for playback control

Closer to Christ

5/25/2024
If you could have lived during the time of Christ, would you have wanted to be close to him? Would you have wanted to be with him? I think it's fair to say that, by the time of the 40 days between Christ's resurrection and ascension, his disciples were close to Jesus. After all they had been through, and the experiences they had shared, they had come to the point were they were quite close. Those three-and-a-half years of Jesus' ministry probably were not particularly easy times. Would you have wanted to be one of those people? If so, why? Hello everyone and welcome to the Christian Educational Ministries . It is good to be with you and we thank you for being there and allowing us to make this weekly service possible. Over the past few weeks, we've followed Ron Dart in taking a closer look at the Passover, the resurrection of Christ, and the beginning of the countdown to the Feast of Weeks or . As we find commanded in Leviticus 23: From the day after the Sabbath, the day you brought the sheaf of the wave offering, count off seven full weeks. Count off fifty days up to the day after the seventh Sabbath, and then present an offering of new grain...a wave offering of firstfruits to the Lord. This weekend concludes the fourth of those seven weeks, so tonight we'll join Mr. Dart in examining this time of year and its accompanying harvest—both of grain and of men.

Duration:00:57:07

Ask host to enable sharing for playback control

Jesus and the Oral Law

5/24/2024
The Sermon on the Mount is easily the best known of all Jesus’ discourses, probably because every beginning preacher is encouraged by his mentor to speak about that sermon. So even if you don’t read the Bible very much, you still would have heard, The sermon is a memorable work, with the poetic leading the way. Each of these could be the subject for a much longer exposition. , for example, would make a strong theme for a full sermon. But early on in Jesus’ discourse that day, there is a statement that challenges the very structure of some Christian doctrine. Jesus said plainly that we are not to think something which a surprising number of Christians think anyway. Here it is, in Jesus’ own words: Do not think that I have come to abolish the Law or the Prophets; I have not come to abolish them but to fulfill them. I tell you the truth, until heaven and earth disappear, not the smallest letter, not the least stroke of a pen, will by any means disappear from the Law until everything is accomplished. There are two criteria that have to be in place for a comma or the crossing of a to pass from the law. One: Heaven and earth have to disappear. (As I record this program, they are still here.) Two: Everything must be accomplished. And there is a rather large array of things that God has said he will do that haven’t rolled around yet, so we’re still waiting. This poses a huge problem for anyone who is aware of the contents of the law that Jesus is talking about. Let me explain what I mean.

Duration:00:28:19

Ask host to enable sharing for playback control

The Ten Commandments #8

5/23/2024
If you were to take a survey among Christian people you would find that most of them believe in the Ten Commandments. After all, the Ten Commandments are the basis of all morality and the basis for the worship of God. Why is it, then, that the vast majority of Christian people outright ignore one of those commandments? No I don’t mean Christian people sin, but they know adultery is wrong. It is not so much that they’re ignoring the commandment, they are simply breaking it, and in many cases they will repent later of breaking it. I am talking about a commandment that is ignored altogether—that is violated without even a sense of guilt. Now, which commandment might that be? You’ll find the Ten Commandments in the 20th chapter of Exodus and you’ll find this commandment beginning in verse eight: Remember the Sabbath day, to keep it holy. Six days you shall labor, and do all your work. But the seventh day is the Sabbath of the Lord your God. In it you shall not do any work, you, your son, nor your daughter, your manservant, nor your maidservant, nor your cattle, nor your stranger that is within your gates. For in six days the Lord made heaven and earth, and the sea, and all that in them is, and rested the seventh day, wherefore the Lord blessed the Sabbath day, and hallowed it. Now I don’t know what could be clearer than this. Work six days and rest one. The odd thing is, there was a time when many, if not most, Christian people honored the Sabbath day on Sunday. Sunday was a Christian Sabbath and Saturday was the Jewish Sabbath, but never mind that difference for the moment. Just consider the thing in principle. Why did the Christian church forsake even nominal observance of the Sabbath Day? Because they did. You can see the progression clearly in modern history—it’s inescapable.

Duration:00:28:01

Ask host to enable sharing for playback control

The Ten Commandments #7

5/22/2024
When you were a kid, did anyone ever make fun of your name? Chances are pretty good they did. Sometimes it was funny. Sometimes it hurt. Of course, it hurts to be made fun of if your nose is too big, your ears look like someone left the doors open on a Chevy pickup. But there is something about your name that makes it a special target. Your name is who you are. And after you have lived on this earth for a while, your name is you. When someone uses your name, you and you alone are the sum total what they are talking about. You are the meaning of your name. So when God says, “Thou shalt not take the name of the Lord thy God in vain; for the Lord will not hold him guiltless that taketh his name in vain.” Perhaps we should take it seriously. God’s name is not a playground joke. I hadn’t noticed until Dr. Laura Schlesinger pointed it out in her book on the Ten Commandments, but of all the Ten Commandments, giving God a bad name is the only one with a threat of immediate punishment. I expect to the poor trembling Israelites at the foot of Mt. Sinai, the words of the Third Commandment went deep: “Thou shalt not take the name of the Lord thy God in vain; for the Lord will not hold him guiltless that taketh his name in vain.” But what does that mean?

Duration:00:27:28

Ask host to enable sharing for playback control

The Ten Commandments #6

5/21/2024
By the time God finished thundering the First Commandment down from Mount Sinai, I expect most of the people waiting below were shattered. The experience of God, first-hand, was more than they could bear. There was thunder and lighting on the mountain, and the sound of a trumpet that was so loud it nearly broke the rocks, and then the voice of God rolling down the mountainside. All this was enough to loosen the bowels of a man. Many people probably fainted dead away, and we haven’t even gotten to the Second Commandment yet. The Creator God speaks from the top of Mount Sinai with the mountain smoking in His presence. With thunder and lightning everywhere, and with some grown, strong men fainting dead away at the foot of the mountain from the sound of His voice, He says: You shall have no other gods before me. You shall not make unto yourself any graven image, or any likeness of any thing that is in heaven above, or that is in the earth beneath, or that is in the water under the earth: You shall not bow down yourself to them, nor serve them: for I the Lord your God am a jealous God, visiting the iniquity of the fathers upon the children unto the third and fourth generation of them that hate me; And showing mercy unto thousands of them that love me, and keep my commandments. There it is, the Second Commandment! Now, what is so important about graven images? What’s the big deal?

Duration:00:27:54

Ask host to enable sharing for playback control

The Ten Commandments #5

5/20/2024
The southern end of the Sinai Peninsula has to be one of the most desolate spots on the globe. Beautiful? Hardly. We’re not talking about the Swiss Alps, here. And when you look at a map, you have to wonder what led God to bring these people here to give them the Ten Commandments. The journey was long, hard, and hot—it would have been nearly June on our calendar. They had already given Moses a lot of misery about a lack of food and water, and now he brought them to this desolate place, and a lot of them probably wondered, The desolation, though, was probably part of the point. God was going to reveal himself to a chosen people. It would be a spectacular revelation. He was going to enter into a covenant with them and no one else. And so he brought them to the only place they could have gone on foot where he could be alone be a few hundred thousand people. It was not a place with green grass, trees, and brooks of water; it was dry, dusty, hot, and uncomfortable. But, if you’ve read the Bible very much you’ll realize that God is not very concerned with our material comfort; he’s after something a little more important than that. When these people finally made camp at Mount Sinai, the air must have been electric with anticipation. They had no way of knowing what was going to happen, but they knew they had come here to meet God. Moses went up the mountain for a preliminary meeting with God, and he came back with this message.

Duration:00:27:32

Ask host to enable sharing for playback control

Why Pentecost on Sunday?

5/17/2024

Duration:00:45:08

Ask host to enable sharing for playback control

The Power of the Written Word

5/17/2024
Sitting here, watching an impending moral collapse, one is led to wonder what’s going on—what is the proximate cause of all this? I can tell you where I think we went wrong; but to do so, I need something to stand on. And I always try to stand on the Bible to look at issues like this. That’s my worldview. And when you come to an issue like this from a biblical worldview, you find precisely where the responsibility can be laid. When this social pattern was repeated before, a prophet named Jeremiah laid the blame right where it belonged. Woe be unto the shepherds that destroy and scatter the sheep of my pasture! says the Lord. Therefore thus says the Lord God of Israel against the shepherds that feed my people; You have scattered my flock, and driven them away, and have not visited them: behold, I will visit upon you the evil of your doings, says the Lord. I will tell you that this chapter has made me shudder from time to time. These are the shepherds of his people that God is talking about, and that is a term reserved for the priests, the prophets, the teachers of the law. So I wouldn’t look to the secular progressives as the cause of the problem. Rather they are the symptoms of the moral disease. Jeremiah now decides to speak on his own: My heart within me is broken because of the prophets; all my bones shake; I am like a drunken man, and like a man whom wine has overcome, because of the Lord, and because of the words of his holiness. For the land is full of adulterers; for because of swearing the land mourns; the pleasant places of the wilderness are dried up, and their course is evil, and their might is not right. For both prophet and priest are profane; yea, in my house have I found their wickedness, says the Lord. In Hebrew usage, the prophet is the preacher and the priest is the judiciary—in our society, that might include congress. There is no question that the blame for this deplorable collapse of morals is laid at the feet of the preachers and the civil leaders. But how on earth can that be? When people speak for God, how can they be blamed for a moral collapse? One commentator, in a piece on the Tower of Babel, made an important point: But that was millennia ago. Now, for the first time the whole world speaks the same language. Yet it is not propositional; rather, it is pictorial, literally focused on As a result, the whole process militates against reason because images have become the sum and substance of truth, and the written word is no longer user-friendly. For all practical purposes, truth has been relegated to technology, beauty has been subjugated to the beholder, and goodness is mocked night after night as millions are idiotized before a box. We have been left as expendable entities in a disposable world, and our experiences have become fragmented quantities in a disjointed world. Yet, the fearful symmetry remains, for at such a time as this we are called to proclaim, Is the written Word the best method for an infinite God to have chosen to reveal Himself? Yes! Indeed, an emphatic yes! I’m not sure I follow him all the way through this; he is speaking figuratively, I think. But his point will be that the written word is the way God has chosen to reveal himself, and with this I absolutely agree. I take that to mean that if you don’t stand on the Bible, the word, you are in danger of idolatry—the use of images, which are of little value in reasoning. And the results of the gradual abandonment of the word, even in religious contexts, is what follows in Jeremiah’s prophecy.

Duration:00:28:04

Ask host to enable sharing for playback control

The Ten Commandments #4

5/16/2024
The road out of Egypt is not a pleasant drive. It boggles my mind to think about walking it with a million refugees. I set out one morning in a borrowed Volkswagen to drive from Cairo to the Suez Canal. My wife was with me, as was a lady we intended to baptize in, of all places, the Red Sea. It is a desolate wilderness across there. Once you leave the Nile Valley, there is, well, nothing. The only thing we passed on the road was a downed Russian aircraft in the desert. According to the book of Exodus, 600,000 men (plus women and children) set out across that desert to freedom led by Charlton Hes…excuse me…I mean, led by Moses. You don’t have to be very perceptive to realize that this gaggle of refugees, under the best of conditions, would be nothing but trouble. And these were not the best of conditions. But they were free, and it is hard for us to imagine what that meant to them. It is just that they had no idea yet what it was going to mean. At any point in history, men have to make decisions about what freedom is worth. Again and again in history, men have given up freedom for safety and comfort. And the road to slavery is not always seen for what it is. The road from slavery has its own share of difficulties, as well. We begin following the children of Israel along that road in Exodus, chapter 12.

Duration:00:27:32

Ask host to enable sharing for playback control

The Ten Commandments #3

5/15/2024
The story of the Exodus is a tremendous story: a wonderful story of liberty, freedom, and an end to slavery for an entire people. It is a story of triumph—and it is also a story of great tragedy. Yes, it involves the birth of a great nation, but it also involves the destruction of a great nation and of one of the world’s most powerful rulers. And because the Bible is such a big story, people often see only part of it at one time and fail to realize the implications of what they read. Some people see only the joy of freedom for the Israelites. Others see the destruction of the Egyptian economy and society and the killing of the firstborn children of all the Egyptian families. It was one of the greatest crises in all of history—and not necessarily the best understood. I knew a fellow once who just couldn’t accept the Passover story. , he wondered. But the part of the story that is not so often told is the brutal subjugation of the Israelites by the Egyptians (all of the Egyptians were involved) and the killing of a whole generation of Israelite babies by the Egyptians—all of the Egyptians. If you think of God as just, how could God not take some form of justice on the Egyptians for their cruelty? We begin the story of this fateful night in Exodus, chapter 12.

Duration:00:27:56

Ask host to enable sharing for playback control

The Ten Commandments #2

5/14/2024
Nearly everyone knows the story of the Exodus. Between Charlton Heston playing Moses in the movie and the animated the story has been thoroughly told to the masses. But there is an aspect of it that continues to trouble a lot of people who read the Bible. Pharaoh had no choice. God hardened his heart again and again. It would be one thing if Pharaoh were Hitler: a thoroughly bad man who himself was hard-hearted, started hard-hearted, and stayed that way. But the scriptures don’t say that. There is little doubt Pharaoh was a bad actor, but the Scriptures say categorically that God hardened his heart so he would not let Israel go. I can still remember the first time that I ever encountered this idea. It was in Paul’s writings, and I was just a teenager. I read in Romans 19, verse 17: For the scripture says unto Pharaoh, Even for this same purpose have I raised you up, that I might show my power in you, and that my name might be declared throughout all the earth. Therefore has he mercy on whom he will have mercy, and whom he will he hardens. You will say then unto me, Why does he yet find fault? For who has resisted his will? Nay but, O man, who are you that replies against God? Shall the thing formed say to him that formed it, Why have you made me thus? Has not the potter power over the clay, of the same lump to make one vessel unto honor, and another unto dishonor? What if God, willing to show his wrath, and to make his power known, endured with much longsuffering the vessels of wrath fitted to destruction[.] Now, that’s a clear reference to Pharaoh and the Egyptians. But I’ll tell you, it was chilling to me as a young man reading the Bible to consider the possibility, however remote, that I might be a : someone actually created to dishonor. And there is no question about it when you read the story in Exodus–God hardened Pharaoh’s heart. But there is an aspect of that story that rarely gets told. Nothing I have ever seen in the movies about this event accurately portrays what the Egyptians did to the Israelites, and over what period of time they did it.

Duration:00:27:56

Ask host to enable sharing for playback control

The Ten Commandments #1

5/13/2024
The world can be a very confusing place, can’t it? It isn’t always easy to know the right thing to do, the right road to take, or the right decision to make. And most of us, most of the time, want to do the right thing. At least we want to think we want to do the right thing. But it seems that, in the modern world, the right thing to do keeps shifting ground on us. There is no constant standard—no absolute truth—some people tell us. The problem is that life and death really are absolutes. When the chest pains come upon you, when they have yelled, , and tried to shock you back into life, and have failed, when they have pulled that sheet up over your face, you are absolutely dead. Sickness, poverty, slavery, disease, hunger; these are real absolutes in the world. So how come we hear people telling us there are no absolutes, when we know better? Why should anyone be so stupid as to believe there aren’t rules of life somewhere that make the difference between life and death, sickness and health, wealth and poverty, when you see these around you every day? Oh sure, time and chance account for a lot of man’s trouble, but on the whole, there is a way that leads to life and a way that leads to death. Intuitively, most of us know that—we just aren’t sure what those ways might be. When you come to the crossroads, how can you know which road to take?

Duration:00:28:00

Ask host to enable sharing for playback control

The First Day of the Week?

5/10/2024

Duration:00:48:09

Ask host to enable sharing for playback control

The Greatest Leader

5/9/2024
In all of the Bible, who is the greatest example of leadership (apart from Jesus, of course)? Without a doubt, it’s David. When you speak of David in a Biblical context, the name needs no modifier. You don’t have to call him King David for a Bible reader to know exactly who you are talking about. His name occurs more than 1,000 times in the Old Testament alone. A curious fact: No one else in the Bible was ever named . This is, I think, very unusual given the very human proclivity for naming kids after famous people. Yet, with David, it didn’t happen. It is almost as though God intended for David to be, and always be, one of a kind. Names in Hebrew mean something, and until recently, I had never looked at the meaning of David’s name, nor had I ever thought much about the characteristics of this man that made him such a great leader. He is easily the most influential and dominant figure in the Old Testament. He was the youngest of eight sons. His brothers thought he was arrogant. The key story of his life is familiar, but I want to extract from the story the elements of leadership in David that emerge from it. We’ll begin in 1 Samuel, chapter 17.

Duration:00:28:01

Ask host to enable sharing for playback control

The Destroyer

5/8/2024
There was a time when we knew what terrorists wanted. When they blew up something, they identified themselves and made their demands. We knew what they wanted and why they wanted it. All that has changed. Now terrorists don't identify their cause, nor do they make demands. What do they want? At the time, I concluded that what they wanted was Americans dead, in large numbers. On the surface, this is a religious war. But like a deadly iceberg, there is a lot more below the surface than above it. Europe's great religious wars ended 350 years ago. That's plenty of time for us to forget that it is possible for people to slaughter one another over a matter of religious faith. It is frightening, isn't it? And we do well to be frightened. There is great evil afoot in the world. What makes the perpetrators of this evil dangerous is that they don't care who they kill, and they don't care if they die in the process. And it is only natural to wonder if we are approaching some of the terrible events of the end time described in the Book of Revelation. It's possible, but let me introduce you to one of the players in the Book of Revelation: The Destroyer…

Duration:00:27:35

Ask host to enable sharing for playback control

Christianity Lite

5/7/2024
We need to talk about Haiti. I know you’ve probably had more Haiti on your television than you’d like to see for some time; you’ve had enough. My question, though, is, “What more could Christians have done for that poor land?” Haiti is actually a largely Christian country, with Roman Catholicism professed by 80% of the Haitians. Protestants made up about 16% of the population. And then there’s Haitian Voodoo, which is practiced by roughly half of the population. Now it’s in that demographic that you get a hint of the problem, don’t you? Did you see it? How can you have a population that is 96% Christian and 50% practitioners of Voodoo? Something is not quite right in Haiti, and it’s a hard thing to say. Is there anything that we Christians might have done that we left undone? Several years ago, I read a book entitled . It was the story of the search for a missing son in Sierra Leone, Africa. The title was the name given to Sierra Leone by slavers who used to call there. I don’t even remember what the purpose of the book was. I was so overwhelmed by the descriptions of tribal life, and the religion and superstitions of those people that I was left feeling hopeless. How on Earth, I wondered, could the Christian faith penetrate that darkness? After some years, I began to see it in the chain that led to the tragic spread of AIDS in Africa. Being a Bible teacher (and in my career I’ve taught all of it, front to back), I came to see in the theories of the development of the disease in Africa a chain of broken laws. Laws the African people never knew because, in many cases, even the Christian missionaries didn’t bother to tell them. The law that would have prevented AIDS from becoming epidemic in Africa, I concluded, was the Law of Moses. If memory serves, in a previous program I did (“A Covenant for AIDS”), I found a sequence of about seven laws; any one of which, faithfully observed throughout Africa, would have prevented AIDS from ever getting a foothold in that continent. Now, while I musing about the wretchedness of Haiti, an article arrived on my desk by Mary Eberstadt. I think she has coined a new term for the Christian failure that’s been much on my mind, and I never got a title on it. Her article (which appeared in the January 2010 edition of ) was titled …

Duration:00:28:15

Ask host to enable sharing for playback control

Six Weeks to Pentecost

5/4/2024

Duration:00:42:55