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Independent journalism focused on environmental and economic sustainability

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Independent journalism focused on environmental and economic sustainability

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Episodes
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Juan Cole: Israel, Gaza and Campus Protests, Part II

5/14/2024
This week on Sea Change Radio, the second half of our discussion with Middle East expert Juan Cole of the University of Michigan. In this episode, we talk about some of the problems presented by certain trigger words when discussing Israel and Palestine and look at the handling of recent campus protests by police and college administrators. Then, we revisit part of our 2022 conversation with Prof. Cole to examine environmental and energy-related issues in the Fertile Crescent. Narrator | 00:02 - This is Sea Change Radio, covering the shift to sustainability. I'm Alex Wise. Juan Cole (JC) | 00:19 - I don't see how anybody can investigate what's been going on in the Palestinian West Bank since 1967 and not come to the conclusion that this is an, is an apartheid arrangement. Narrator | 00:33 - This week on Sea Change Radio, the second half of our discussion with Middle East expert Juan Cole of the University of Michigan. In this episode, we talk about some of the problems presented by certain trigger words when discussing Israel and Palestine and look at the handling of recent campus protests by police and college administrators. Then we revisit part of our 2022 conversation with Professor Cole to examine environmental and energy related issues in the Fertile Crescent. Alex Wise (AW) | 01:05 - I am joined now on Sea Change Radio by Juan Cole. Juan is a professor of history at the University of Michigan. Juan, welcome back to Sea Change. Radio. Juan Cole (JC) | 01:26 - Thank you so much. Alex Wise (AW) | 01:27 - Let's talk about the language for a second, because I think there are these trigger words like anti-Semitism and genocide, and Zionism, which can be in the eye of the beholder used either as a cudgel, a pejorative, but also a compliment. There's a lot of wiggle room within these words, and I think they're, they're lightning rods for a lot of misunderstanding. For example, what you just said, if somebody is protesting what's happening in Gaza, does that make them anti-Semitic, some people would say, yes. You talk about Trump. There's that refuge that they constantly seek in victimization, right? He's always the victim when he's in court. He wants to be a martyr, even though he's, he's led one of the most privileged lives anyone can possibly consider. Antisemitism is also, it's used to be victims when there's not necessarily anybody being victimized in this sense, except that you happen to be Jewish and you disagree with me. It's difficult because I want to respect the people who have had to deal with a lot more antisemitism than me, for example. But I can't help but draw some parallels with the MAGA victimization and some of American Jewish people who are very quick to assign this term to people. And on the flip side, I think genocide is a trigger word, like apartheid was, it's not necessarily inaccurate, but it's a trigger word because people think, "oh, well, genocide is.. that's the holocaust. That's not war." It definitely can incite, escalate the rhetoric, I think sometimes unfairly and to a level that I think is counterproductive. Juan Cole (JC) | 03:17 - You're right, these words, are not used in the same way by everybody. And the differences in nuance can cause problems. There are people who would say that Zionism is a settler colonial ideology. And if you identify as a Zionist and you're identifying with, with a historic wrong, I think for a lot of American Jews who say they're Zionists, what they mean is they're proud of Albert Einstein, and they're proud of the accomplishments of, of the Jewish people by saying they're Zionists. They don't mean that Itamar Ben-Gvir is allowed to invade a Palestinian's property in the West Bank and usurp it. AW | 04:00 - I think it's such a hard word to generalize. I just have family members, for example, who might think they're Zionists because they think that Israel has a right to exist versus somebody who thinks that Israel has a right to the whole...

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Juan Cole: Israel, Gaza and Campus Protests, Part I

5/7/2024
Pro-Palestinian student protests are erupting on college campuses all over the country, often resulting in aggressive responses from local law enforcement. This week on Sea Change Radio, the first half of our two-part discussion with noted Michigan University history professor and Middle East scholar, Juan Cole. We look at the Israeli attacks on Gaza, discuss the unrest it has caused on campuses around this country, and examine how the right-wing parties in both the US and Israel are trying to leverage the conflict to their own benefit. Narrator | 00:02 - This is Sea Change Radio, covering the shift to sustainability. I'm Alex Wise. Juan Cole (JC) | 00:19 - So they're weaponizing their position in Congress to attack, uh, the university presidents, and also they're in some ways in cahoots then with some of these very wealthy donors who are also donors to their campaigns, to use their political position to curb freedom of speech for Americans. Narrator | 00:40 - Pro-Palestinian student protests are erupting on college campuses all over the country, often resulting in aggressive responses from local law enforcement. This week on Sea Change Radio, the first half of our two-part discussion with noted Michigan University history professor and Middle East scholar, Juan Cole. We look at the Israeli attacks on Gaza, discuss the unrest it has caused on campuses around this country, and examine how the right-wing parties in both the US and Israel are trying to leverage the conflict to their own benefit. Alex Wise (AW) | 02:25 - I am joined now on Sea Change Radio by Juan Cole. Juan is a professor of history at the University of Michigan. Juan, welcome back to Sea Change Radio. Juan Cole (JC) | 01:36 - Thank you so much. Alex Wise (AW) | 01:38 - I've really wanted to speak to you for quite some time. I wanted to get your perspective on the college protests that are stemming from the Israeli Hamas conflict. First, why don't you, if you can summarize these college protests and, and it's a tough question because there's a wide range of not only the scope of these protests, but on the clampdowns from campus to campus, but maybe for people who haven't really been following in that closely, kind of fill them in on what's been happening around the country in the last month or so. Juan Cole (JC) | 02:11 - The protests are a response by these undergraduates, mainly undergraduates, to the ongoing Israeli military campaign against Gaza. I think the young people on campus are, are living this war in a way that their elders are not. They've seen the war unfold daily on their phones. They see the horrible clips of wounded, civilians, displaced people, health problems, uh, that have been imposed by the war, on TikTok, on, uh, on Instagram and, and so forth. They follow news clips on BBC and so forth. And the elders don't, I mean CNN and other major US cable news outfits, you couldn't accuse them of ignoring the war, but they haven't covered it intensively. I watch a lot of cable news, and as far as I can tell these days, it's all about Trump's trials and these inside the beltway panels that discuss things endlessly, you don't see very much news from the front. Alex Wise (AW) | 03:22 - It's expensive to cover. It's a lot cheaper to just have a panel of people talking about Trump. JC | 03:27 - It's for their bottom line. Also, you know, the, the corporate news is selling advertising. I mean, it's selling us toilet paper and fast food. And you have to wonder whether scenes of, uh, wounded babies covered in flies from Gaza is, is actually going to, uh, is help their bottom line. And, uh, I think there are a lot of reasons for which they simply haven't covered this, uh, story in any intensive way. And of course, they can't with their own reporters. And that's another, uh, problem for them is, is a news organization. You get caught, you know, sometimes if you depend on somebody else's feed,

Duration:00:29:00

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The Journey of Kevin Ortiz: From Punishment to Politics

4/30/2024
How do you think your life would be different if you had spent your first five years as an adult incarcerated? This week on Sea Change Radio, we speak to Kevin Ortiz, a progressive political activist in San Francisco whose life was very nearly derailed by a run-in with the police when he was 19 years old. We hear Kevin’s story, learn how the nonprofit SF Pretrial helped him out, and get some first-hand insight into a legal system that is tilted against young men of color. Then, we hear an excerpt from our 2022 discussion with San Francisco Public Defender Peter Calloway. Narrator | 00:02 - This is Sea Change Radio covering the shift to sustainability. I'm Alex Wise. Kevin Ortiz | 00:14 - No system's perfect, right? But if we're going to look at the overall successes of people being able to get connected, and through SF Pretrial, able to come out of it with secure jobs, housing, drug rehabilitative services, and then social emotional supports, right? And then being able to go back into being successful citizens, then that's a model that we should be actually continuing to expand funding for and not underfunding it or cutting funding to it. Narrator | 00:40 - How do you think your life would be different if you had spent your first five years as an adult incarcerated? This week on Sea Change Radio, we speak to Kevin Ortiz, a progressive political activist in San Francisco whose life was very nearly derailed by a run-in with the police when he was 19 years old. We hear Kevin’s story, learn how the nonprofit SF Pretrial helped him out, and get some first-hand insight into a legal system that is tilted against young men of color. Then, we hear an excerpt from our 2022 discussion with San Francisco Public Defender Peter Calloway. Alex Wise (AW) | 01:30 - I'm joined on Sea Change Radio by Kevin Ortiz. Kevin is the president of the San Francisco Latino Democratic Club. Kevin, welcome to Sea. Change Radio. Kevin Ortiz (KO) | 01:42 - Hey, thanks for having me on. Alex Wise (AW) | 01:44 - Why don't you start us off, Kevin, by giving us your backstory and how you encountered legal troubles as a younger man. Kevin Ortiz (KO) | 01:53 - Yeah, definitely. So maybe diving a little bit backwards, um, so I, I just turned 30 when I was 19 years old. I was in a much different place than I'm at now, and so I, you know, was kind of in the party scene drinking a lot more than I should have been. I think, you know, at the time I was also doing drugs, and so it was a different kind of lifestyle that I was living to where I currently am. And so I went out to a club event when I was like 19. I think I was 19 and a half when the incident happened. And so, you know, on 22nd admission for an 18 plus event at that time. And, um, you know, I stumbled out of the bar, right? And, you know, intoxicated, being underage, um, there was already a situation that was going on at that time. And so, you know, I kind of stumbled into it as I was trying to jaywalk across the street. Police stopped me, immediately arrested me because they had so seen that I was intoxicated. And from there I got slammed on the back of a police car. And, um, at that time, you know, I had a little bit of a motor mouth

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Down-Ballot Politics With Daniel Nichanian of Bolts

4/23/2024
Election season is still a few months away, but the scent of it is already on the wind. There is a lot at stake in the presidential election, of course, but that's not the only issue for voters in November. This week on Sea Change Radio, we speak with Daniel Nichanian of Bolts Magazine to get a deeper understanding of the importance of the many down-ballot races on which Americans will be casting votes this fall. We examine state Supreme Court elections in Arizona and North Carolina, and discuss how abortion may affect various swing state races in places like Florida. Narrator | 00:02 - This is Sea Change Radio covering the shift to sustainability. I'm Alex Wise. Daniel Nichanian (DN) | 00:15 - Trump named the federal justices that overturned Roe. And then the Governor DeSantis signed the law that is now at issue in Florida. So the dots very much connect to Republicans who are already, you know, being put on a defensive on these issues. Whether that actually translates into the presidential race being more competitive, that might be a stretch. We'll see. Narrator | 00:39 - Election season is still a few months away, but the scent of it is already on the wind. There is a lot at stake in the presidential election, of course, but that's not the only issue for voters in November. This week on Sea Change Radio, we speak with Daniel Nichanian of Bolts Magazine to get a deeper understanding of the importance of the many down-ballot races on which Americans will be casting votes this fall. We examine state Supreme Court elections in Arizona and North Carolina, and discuss how abortion may affect various swing state races in places like Florida. Alex Wise (AW) | 01:30 - I am joined now on Sea Change Radio by Daniel Nichanian. He's the founder and editor of Bolts Magazine. Daniel, welcome back to Sea Change Radio. Daniel Nichanian (DN) | 01:41 - It's great to be back. Thanks for having me. Alex Wise (AW) | 01:43 - So, when we first spoke, you were just launching Bolts. Before we dive into all the, the nuts and bolts of this upcoming election, tell us what the mission of the organization is and how it's been evolving since we last spoke a couple years ago. Daniel Nichanian (DN) | 01:59 -Um, yeah, so it's, it's really great to be back after a few years of having Bolts in the world. Now, Bolts… the idea behind Bolts is that for a lot of the big issues that people are interested in or care about, the federal government, just as a very small slice of what's important, of what's happening, it's very important to be aware of the ways in which counties, municipalities, state are also very, very important when it comes to matters linked to civil rights, voting rights, and, and so on. And, and what Bolts does is on the themes we cover, which are really focused on criminal justice on one hand and, and vote voting rights on the other, um, we, we really pay, pay attention to what's happening around the country at these levels, at the local level, at the municipal level, at the county level, at the state level. And we try to connect the dots for people because, you know, there's, uh, a lot of states, a lot of cities, a lot of towns in, around, around the country. And, it's easy to miss the forest for the trees. And it's been great, you know, there's been a lot of interest, um, in the past few years at what's happening with prosecutors, with judges, with sheriffs, with election officials, uh, and the laws that are changing in blue states and red states that are sort of going in in different ways. And it's been great to have this platform to cover all of these issues. AW | 03:19 - And when somebody watches cable news on election night, that's maybe the first time that they'll look at down-ballot races for the year or for the cycle. I think it's really important to be a part of the Democratic process 24 7, and that's what Bolts is designed to do. DN | 03:39 - Yeah, and I think sometimes it may seem esoteric, uh, or it's,

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Maria Gallucci: Zero Emission Marine Vessels

4/16/2024
When it comes to energy transitions, marine vessels tend to get overlooked, even though they are some of the worst polluters of our oceans and air. The heavy duty diesel fuel used by most ships presents serious problems for the planet. This week on Sea Change Radio, we speak with Maria Gallucci, a Senior Reporter at Canary Media, who describes efforts being made to transform boats and ships into zero emission marine fleets. We look at a project to electrify tugboats in San Diego, a cutting-edge hydrogen ferry about to launch in San Francisco, and innovations to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the international cargo shipping space. Narrator | 00:02 - This is Sea Change Radio, covering the shift to sustainability. I'm Alex Wise. Maria Gallucci (MG) | 00:17 - When we think about the effect that these vessels have, yes, they are certainly contributing to climate change in a very real way. They're also directly spewing pollution into these communities as well. Narrator | 00:30 - When it comes to energy transitions, marine vessels tend to get overlooked, even though they are some of the worst polluters of our oceans and air. The heavy duty diesel fuel used by most ships presents serious problems for the planet. This week on Sea Change Radio, we speak with Maria Gallucci, a Senior Reporter at Canary Media, who describes efforts being made to transform boats and ships into zero emission marine fleets. We look at a project to electrify tugboats in San Diego, a cutting-edge hydrogen ferry about to launch in San Francisco, and innovations to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the international cargo shipping space. Alex Wise (AW) | 01:30 - I am joined now on Sea Change Radio by Maria Gallucci. Maria is a senior reporter for Canary Media. Maria, welcome to Sea Change Radio. Maria Gallucci (MG) | 01:43 - Hi. Thanks for having me. Alex Wise (AW) | 01:45 - Why don't you first tell us about Canary Media. You just recently celebrated your third anniversary, correct? Maria Gallucci (MG) | 01:51 - Yes, we did. So, Canary Media is a nonprofit newsroom covering the clean energy transition. We are a fully independent outlet, and we focus primarily on the United States, but kind of hoping to expand globally because obviously this is an issue that affects everywhere. AW | 02:07 - When we think about energy transitions, we're often thinking about getting an electric vehicle or making a change to our electric grid. But one of the more global issues is ocean transport. And you've written a few pieces on how maritime vessels are trying to electrify. Why don't you first kind of give us an overview of some of the industry's problems that they're facing and, and what the solutions could be on the horizon? MG | 02:36 - Sure. So globally, the International Shipping Sector accounts for about 3% of greenhouse gas emissions every year. That includes cargo ships, harbor crafts, and all types of vessels that serve this massive multi-trillion dollar industry. And there are kind of many ways to go about tackling the problem of, one of which is, is developing greener fuels to go in these cargo ships. Another is electrifying, uh, especially the smaller vessels like tugboats and ferries. Still complicated and expensive to do, but, uh, we're starting to see a lot of progress on harbor craft and particular that operate close to ports close to communities. And so it's not just a solution for reducing greenhouse gas emissions, but also kind of these toxic air pollutants that concentrate in communities. AW | 03:28 - So these harbor craft, let's focus on those a little bit more. It makes a lot of sense. These are kind of the low hanging fruit for transitioning to electrification, right? You can recharge them pretty frequently because they're not out to Sea for two or three days. MG | 03:43 - Exactly. Uh, ferries especially, and even tugboats, they kind of have a home base. They'll go out, they'll do the run, they'll come back,

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California Termites and the Atmosphere

4/9/2024
California is famous for its picturesque sunsets, year-round mild weather, excellent surf, and largely progressive politics, including forward-thinking greenhouse emission policies. This week on Sea Change Radio, however, we learn about a less pleasant claim to fame for the golden state. Today we're speaking with two scientists from Johns Hopkins University who are working to uncover the mysteries behind a dangerous greenhouse gas: sulfuryl fluoride. One such mystery is why so much of this harmful atmospheric compound originates from Southern California. Dylan Gaeta and Scot Miller walk us through changes in termite-eradication practices, how termites are not all alike, and what needs to happen in the nation's most populous state and elsewhere to solve the problem. Narrator | 00:02 - This is Sea Change Radio covering the shift to sustainability. I'm Alex Wise. Dylan Gaeta | 00:20 - These sort of policies mandate emissions reductions of greenhouse gases across the board, but in all of these cases, sulfuryl fluoride isn't included in that list of greenhouse gases that require emissions reductions. So in, in that sense, it's sort of slipping through the cracks or under the radar, and are greenhouse gas emissions accounting. Narrator | 00:40 - California is famous for its picturesque sunsets, year-round mild weather, excellent surf, and largely progressive politics, including forward-thinking greenhouse emission policies. This week on Sea Change Radio, however, we learn about a less pleasant claim to fame for the golden state. Today we're speaking with two scientists from Johns Hopkins University who are working to uncover the mysteries behind a dangerous greenhouse gas: sulfuryl fluoride. One such mystery is why so much of this harmful atmospheric compound originates from Southern California. Dylan Gaeta and Scot Miller walk us through changes in termite-eradication practices, how termites are not all alike, and what needs to happen in the nation's most populous state and elsewhere to solve the problem. Alex Wise | 01:35 - I am joined now on Sea Change Radio by Dylan Gaeta and Scot Miller Dylan is a PhD candidate at Johns Hopkins School of Environmental Engineering, and Scot is an assistant professor there. Scot, Dylan - welcome to Sea Change Radio. Dylan Gaeta | 01:57 - Yeah, thank you for having us. Yeah, thanks. It's great to be here. Alex Wise | 02:01 - So, Dylan, you are the lead on this study that is just getting published entitled, California Dominates US Emissions of the Pesticide and Potent Greenhouse Gas, sulfuryl fluoride. Explain the genesis of your research and why people should be aware of this. Dylan Gaeta | 02:23 - I hadn't heard of sulfuryl fluoride until I, until I came to Hopkins and started my PhD here. And this was around 2020 and I started working with Scot. And so Scot had been in contact with a colleague from the NOAA Global Monitoring Laboratories, who was sort of at the end of his career and had started looking at this gas around 2015. NOAA started, no, no, global Monitoring Laboratory started making these measurements and sort of pass it on to Scot as to say like, well, I'm out of time to, to look at this myself, but maybe this would be a good, um, topic to look into further. And so, so I, um, we started digging into where the SC is emitted in the world and like what, what, what it's used for, um, how it's been accumulating in the global atmosphere. Um, and when we started looking at those measurements, we sort of found, um, a sort of striking lack of information about the global distribution of this gas and where it's being used and what it's being used for and where, how much is being emitted in different parts of the world. And so what we did in our research study is that we, we used atmospheric measurements that were collected by our colleagues over at the, the NOAA Global Monitoring Laboratory. And we started and we used those atmospheric measurements to,

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Rod Graham: The Case For Legacy Preference in College Admissions

4/2/2024
Legacy students, applicants whose families attended the school, comprised 36 percent of Harvard's class of 2022. Notably, 77% of students admitted to Harvard via legacy preference are white. These days, however, the practice of giving legacy applicants a competitive edge over their peers in college admission decisions has come under fire. Last week on Sea Change Radio, we spoke with Law Professor John Brittain, from the University of the District of Columbia, who made the case for ending legacy preference in college admissions, asserting that it preserves wealth, power, and privilege. This week, we speak to Rod Graham, a sociology professor at Old Dominion University, who offers a contrasting perspective. Graham explains why he believes that legacy preference admissions should just be considered another factor that admissions officers should be free to consider, similar to how they may weigh an applicant's geography, race, athletic prowess, and other factors. Narrator | 00:02 - This is Sea Change Radio, covering the shift to sustainability. I'm Alex Wise. Rod Graham (RG) | 00:19 - So we have what looks like a meritocracy because those kids earned their way there by doing the things to get there. But the people who went to the Ivy League schools in the seventies and eighties are sending their kids to Ivy League schools now, who will then send their kids to Ivy League schools later. Narrator | 00:38 - Legacy students, applicants whose families attended the school, comprised 36 percent of Harvard's class of 2022. Notably, 77% of students admitted to Harvard via legacy preference are white. These days, however, the practice of giving legacy applicants a competitive edge over their peers in college admission decisions has come under fire. Last week on Sea Change Radio, we spoke with Law Professor John Brittain, from the University of the District of Columbia, who made the case for ending legacy preference in college admissions, asserting that it preserves wealth, power, and privilege. This week, we speak to Rod Graham, a sociology professor at Old Dominion University, who offers a contrasting perspective. Graham explains why he believes that legacy preference admissions should just be considered another factor that admissions officers should be free to consider, similar to how they may weigh an applicant's geography, race, athletic prowess, and other factors. Alex Wise (AW) | 01:55 I am joined now on Sea Change Radio by Rod Graham. He is a sociology professor at Old Dominion University. Rod, welcome back to Sea Change Radio. Rod Graham (RG) | 02:12 - Hey, Alex. It's nice to be back. Alex Wise (AW) | 02:14 - I've missed you, my friend. And I wanted to discuss a piece that you wrote on your medium site. It was entitled, why I Support Legacy Admissions in Universities Instead of Me summarizing it. Why don't I first let you have the podium and explain the thinking behind this piece? Rod Graham (RG) | 02:34 - Yeah, sure. Well, I, I think that institutions, uh, particularly educational institutions should have some leeway in building the student body that they think fits their mission. Um, it's not absolute, but some leeway, right? So if it, if it is the case that, an institution says, look, you know, there are reasons why we need to have legacy admissions. I'm for that. It's the same reason actually why I'm for affirmative action, or I think in the piece, uh, that you mentioned, the example I gave was my university, which doesn't have to worry about legacy admissions really, uh, or affirmative action or any of those things. But we do have a large military, uh, presence in the community, and it's in our best interest to, in effect, have preferences for, uh, military affiliate affiliated people, veterans or active or even their, their family members. And so I think it's a good idea within reason for an institution to have military preferences, affirmative action, and then also legacy, uh, preferences.

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The Myth of Meritocracy Revisited: John Brittain on Legacy Preference (2017)

3/26/2024
Longtime listeners know that Sea Change Radio is not a debate format - we do not generally provide a platform for climate change deniers or other purveyors of disinformation. But when it comes to certain topics, we do believe there is room for spirited discourse. Next week's guest will argue in favor of preserving legacy preferences in college admissions. In preparation for that conversation, and to provide context and a counterpoint, this week we are dipping into the Sea Change Radio archives to revisit our 2017 discussion with Prof. John Brittain. The official subject matter of Sea Change Radio is environmental sustainability. This week, however, we are deviating from that to talk about a topic that we believe is inextricably linked to sustainability: stratification in education. We are talking with law professor, civil rights advocate, and educational diversity expert, Prof. John C. Brittain, about educational practices that perpetuate social, racial, and socioeconomic exclusiveness. Elite private schools were once restricted to wealthy white young men. Since the 1960s we have seen some progress at these schools – they all admit women, most have scholarship programs to make room for the non-wealthy, and they generally boast of need-blind admissions practices. But there is one hidden practice, often overlooked, which runs counter to all of that progress: the practice of legacy admissions. That is, giving preference to applicants who have a family connection to the school. The majority of elite educational institutions in this country do this. For example, in 2017, a full 41% of Harvard’s incoming freshman were legacies. Logic tells us that generation after generation, this sort of admission preference can’t be doing much for these schools’ demographic diversity. Professor Brittain and host Alex Wise discuss how legacy admission practices serve as affirmative action for the privileged, the irony that the practice thrives in the United States which holds itself up as a model meritocracy and how schools’ justifications for the ongoing use of legacy preferences don’t hold up to a reasoned analysis. Narrator | 00:02 - This is Sea Change Radio covering the shift to sustainability. I'm Alex Wise. John Brittain (JB) | 00:17 - At many elite post-secondary educational institutions, applicants with an alumni parent are accepted at two to three times the rate of those without leading one commentator to label legacy preference as the biggest affirmative action program and American higher education. Narrator (2024)| 00:41 Longtime listeners know that Sea Change Radio is not a debate format. We don't generally provide a platform for climate change deniers or other purveyors of disinformation, but when it comes to certain topics, we do believe there's room for spirited discourse. Next week's guest will argue in favor of preserving legacy preferences in college admissions in preparation for that conversation and to provide context and a counterpoint, this week we're dipping into the Sea Change Radio archives to revisit our discussion with Professor John Brittain. Narrator (2017) | 01:18 - The official subject matter of Sea Change Radio is environmental sustainability. This week, however, we're deviating from that to talk about a topic that we believe is inextricably linked to sustainability stratification in education. We're talking with law professor, civil rights advocate, and educational diversity expert John Brittain about educational practices that perpetuate social, racial and socioeconomic exclusiveness. Elite private schools were once restricted to wealthy white young men. Since the 1960s, we've seen some progress at these schools. They all admit women most have scholarship programs to make room for the non wealthy, and they generally boast of need blind admissions practices. But there is one hidden practice often overlooked, which runs counter to all of that progress, the practice of legacy admissions that is givi...

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Nicole Voudren: Charged Up For EVs

3/19/2024
According to Reuters, electric vehicle sales leapt 50% in the US in 2023, and are expected to grow by another 30% in 2024. But driving around your city or town, you'll probably still see a lot more gas stations than electric charging stations. This week on Sea Change Radio, we learn the ins and outs of electric vehicle infrastructure from Nicole Voudren, an engineer, educator and consultant in the EV charging space. We look at how private industry, public utilities, and governmental agencies are all converging in this new vital area of the economy to help Americans transition away from internal combustion engine vehicles and get electrified. Voudren talks about the Tesla supercharging network, free, ad-based charging initiatives like Volta, and other ways that technologies are improving to help allay the range anxiety that many EV owners experience. Narrator | 00:02 - This is Sea Change Radio covering the shift to sustainability. I'm Alex Wise. Nicole Voudren (NV) | 00:15 - The industry's a bit of a wild west right now, and we need lots of talent to get where we need to go. Narrator | 00:25 - According to Reuters, electric vehicle sales leapt 50% in the US in 2023, and are expected to grow by another 30% in 2024. But driving around your city or town, you'll probably still see a lot more gas stations than electric charging stations. This week on Sea Change Radio, we learn the ins and outs of electric vehicle infrastructure from Nicole Voudren, an engineer, educator and consultant in the EV charging space. We look at how private industry, public utilities, and governmental agencies are all converging in this new vital area of the economy to help Americans transition away from internal combustion engine vehicles and get electrified. Voudren talks about the Tesla supercharging network, free, ad-based charging initiatives like Volta, and other ways that technologies are improving to help allay the range anxiety that many EV owners experience. Alex Wise (AW) |1:30 - I'm joined now in Sea, Change Radio by Nicole Voudren. She's an engineer who provides education about EVs electric vehicles and the EV charging industry. She also works at a startup called Better Together Brain Trust. That's BT two Energy, which focuses on turnkey EV charging assessments and installation. Nicole, welcome to Sea Change Radio. Nicole Voudren (NV) | 01:55 - Excellent. Thank you so much, Alex. I'm delighted to be here. Alex Wise (AW) | 01:58 - Well, it's a pleasure to speak with you. We've done many pieces over the years about electric vehicles, and as a subset of that, we often talk about the infrastructure and the charging and range anxiety and some of these elements. But since the last time we did a piece on EVs, I became an electric vehicle owner. So I have a new perspective on the ins and outs of what it takes to drive around and what it means to be an electric vehicle owner these days in terms of charging. So what are some of the, the most exciting projects that listeners should be aware of in terms of populating this vast road network that we have in the United States with the ability to power an entire country that could someday run on electricity? NV | 02:51 - I think the most exciting is the, the funding coming through from various sources. You know, the federal government is all in on the electrification of transportation, and they're providing, uh, significant grants and funding to states and localities. The local utilities, at least in the northeast where I live, and I know across the United States, are very supportive of EV charging infrastructure deployment and have various funding mechanisms for the capital expense. Because when you are changing from the current fueling infrastructure that we have to an electrified fueling infrastructure, there are a lot of industries that are at play. You have the transportation, the automotive, commercial real estate, utilities, um, you have private businesses, et cetera.

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“To Serve & Protect” Whom? Alec Karakatsanis on Copaganda (re-broadcast)

3/12/2024
What comes to mind when you hear the words “crime” and “safety?” For many, these words evoke images of poor people stealing things, or police enforcing laws to suppress street crime. Our guest today on Sea Change Radio argues that there’s a whole set of crimes that have been intentionally omitted from the messaging we get and that, for many, “police” and “safety” are far from synonymous. This week we speak with Alec Karakatsanis, the founder and executive director of Civil Rights Corps. A former public defender and the author of “Usual Cruelty: The Complicity of Lawyers in the Criminal Injustice System,” Karakatsanis believes that much of our country’s perspective on crime and policing has been shaped by “copaganda,” the swaying of public opinion for the benefit of law enforcement. We look at the corrosive societal effects of historic and current police practices, examine how and why these wrongheaded approaches persist, and discuss the complicity of journalists and policymakers who fall for and then perpetuate the American mythology of crime and safety. 00:01 Narrator - This is Sea Change Radio, covering the shift to sustainability. I'm Alex Wise. 00:20 Alec Karakatsanis (AK) - If you everyday on the news see a story of someone shoplifting from a pharmacy but you never hear a story about that pharmacy stealing from its own workers, then you're going to think that the shoplifting is a more of a problem than wage theft. Even though the exactly the opposite is true. And there are different kinds of problems, right? And there are different kinds of solutions. 00:00:44 Narrator - What comes to mind when you hear the words "crime" and "safety?" For many, these words evoke images of poor people stealing things, or police enforcing laws to suppress street crime. Our guest today on Sea Change Radio argues that there's a whole set of crimes that have been intentionally omitted from the messaging we get and that, for many, "police" and "safety" are far from synonymous. This week we speak with Alec Karakatsanis, the founder and executive director of Civil Rights Corps. A former public defender and the author of “Usual Cruelty: The Complicity of Lawyers in the Criminal Injustice System,” Karakatsanis believes that much of our country’s perspective on crime and policing has been shaped by "copaganda," the swaying of public opinion for the benefit of law enforcement. We look at the corrosive societal effects of historic and current police practices, examine how and why these wrongheaded approaches persist, and discuss the complicity of journalists and policymakers who fall for and then perpetuate the American mythology of crime and safety. 02:05 Alex Wise (AW) - I'm joined now on Sea Change Radio by Alec Karakatsanis. He is the founder and executive director of Civil Rights Corps. Alec, welcome to Sea Change Radio. 02:14 Alec Karakatsanis (AK) - Thank you for having me. 02:16 AW So you have a newsletter entitled Copaganda, Alec’s Copaganda Newsletter. Why don't you define copaganda for us? 02:24 AK - I think there are a lot of ways to understand what copaganda is, so I don't purport to have the definitive understanding of the term, but essentially what it reflects is the way in which a very special kind of propaganda is weaponized by powerful interests in government, in the corporate world and the media. To change the way we think about public safety, change that we think about the criminal punishment bureaucracy and the way we think about police, prosecutors, judges, courts, jails, prisons, probation officers, and I think it really serves 3 main roles. Rule #1: copaganda tends to narrow our conception of safety and what safety means to a very small subset of the many different kinds of threats that there are to public safety. So for example, copaganda and the media tends to focus on low level criminal activity, typically by the poor, and to ignore large scale. Criminal activity by more powerful interests like wage ...

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Andrea Thompson: Battling Extreme Heat Fatigue

3/5/2024
While you're shoveling snow out of the driveway this week, you may not want to hear about extreme heat - but then again, maybe you do! This week on Sea Change Radio, we discuss the issue of a warming planet with Andrea Thompson, a science reporter and associate editor at Scientific American. We look at how people and policymakers are trying to cope with the rising temps, examine how different parts of the globe are being affected, and talk about the challenges of presenting this important information to the public in a fresh, engaging manner. Narrator | 00:02 - This is Sea Change Radio covering the shift to sustainability. I'm Alex Wise. Andrea Thompson (AT) | 00:19 - How much we decide to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by and how quickly we do it is going to greatly affect what kind of summers we have 20, 30 years from now. You know, like what summers my 3-year-old is going to see when he's my age. And it's something that we, we are very much in control on. We get to set the standard for what that's going to be in the future. And the decisions we make now will affect that. Narrator | 00:50 - While you're shoveling snow out of the driveway this week, you may not want to hear about extreme heat - but then again, maybe you do! This week on Sea Change Radio, we discuss the issue of a warming planet with Andrea Thompson, a science reporter and associate editor at Scientific American. We look at how people and policymakers are trying to cope with the rising temps, examine how different parts of the globe are being affected, and talk about the challenges of presenting this important information to the public in a fresh, engaging manner. Alex Wise (AW) | 01:35 - I am joined now on Sea Change Radio by Andrea Thompson. She is an associate editor at Scientific American. Andrea, welcome back to Sea Change Radio. Andrea Thompson (AT) | 01:52 - Thanks for having me. Alex Wise (AW) | 01:54 - So, looking at the work you've done the last few years at Scientific American, it seems like there's a lot of focus on something that we all are very concerned about, which is extreme heat. Why don't we dive into some of these stories, unpack them for our listeners, and, and give them a better idea of where we are and where we're headed and what we can do about it? Andrea Thompson (AT) | 02:20 - Absolutely. Yeah. So I think, you know, kind of the

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Raksha Vasudevan: Rocky Mountain Ways

2/27/2024
Denver, Colorado's majestic mountains, green space, and reputation as an ecologically advanced city draw people into this growing metropolis. But there are some unwanted byproducts that result from the influx of humanity, for example air pollution and gentrification. This week on Sea Change Radio, we speak to Raksha Vasudevan, a freelance journalist and contributing editor to High Country News about the transition of Denver from a remote Rocky Mountain town to a booming metropolis. We learn about the city's industrial history, discuss how its transportation system has evolved, and look at the paradoxes and unintended consequences of major green infrastructure projects. Narrator | 00:02 - This is Sea Change Radio covering the shift to sustainability. I'm Alex Wise. Raksha Vasudevan (RV) | 00:26 - It really is like an unfortunate paradox of, of more people moving you here and of the city growing, is that there's more traffic jams, of course, to get to the mountains. And there are two highways that run through GES. So the people living in that area and people living adjacent to many highways absorb sort of the costs of people trying to access green space, but they don't really get to enjoy any of the benefits. Narrator | 00:54 - Denver, Colorado's majestic mountains green space and reputation as an ecologically advanced city draw people into this growing metropolis. But there are some unwanted byproducts that result from the influx of humanity, for example, air pollution and gentrification. This week on Sea Change Radio, we speak to Raksha Vasudevan, a freelance journalist and contributing editor to High Country News about the transition of Denver from a remote Rocky Mountain town to a booming metropolis. We learn about the city's industrial history, discuss how its transportation system has evolved, and look at the paradoxes and unintended consequences of major green infrastructure projects. Alex Wise (AW) | 02:00 - I am joined now on Sea Change Radio by Raksha Vasudevan. She is a freelance journalist and contributing editor at High Country News Raksha. Welcome to Sea Change Radio. Raksha Vasudevan (RV) | 02:08 - Thank you so much for having me. Alex Wise (AW) | 02:11 - So you have a piece in the December High Country News, or it's, it's, it was published December 1st, 2023 entitled North Denver's Green Space Paradox. And I thought it was a good launching point for a larger discussion about Denver and the environmental issues facing the entire mountain West. You focus on this Globeville Elyria-Swansea or GES community in North Denver. But why don't you first give us a little bit of a history of this region, because you provide that quite well in the piece. RV | 02:47 - Yeah. So this particular community in Denver, but Denver as a whole, one of the reasons for its founding and its growth was because it served as an important link in the Transcontinental Railroad. So it was kind of this frontier town in the west, and of course, when that railroad was built, it displaced the original inhabitants of the area, which was the indigenous people who lived here. But the railroad and the stop in Denver specifically opened a lot of opportunities for Denver. It became more than just a place to pick up your mail on the way out to California. It really became a city in its own right. And soon after the Transcontinental Railroad was built through Denver, um, there were also many iron and ore smelters that were built in the area because of the proximity to the railroad and to, to mines across the country. AW | 03:47 - This is like in the Reconstruction Era, like 1870 to 1890 era, I'm guessing. RV | 03:53 - Yeah, around then, exactly. And so that attracted a lot of new people to this area, especially eastern European immigrants, to come work at these smelters. And eventually it also led to a livestock center and a livestock marketplace, um, which is still around, there's still an annual livestock show in Denver,

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John Stoehr: Betting On Biden

2/21/2024
Sometimes it seems as though Democrats are more determined to "fall in love" than to win elections. Lately I've been hearing, from both pundits and friends, that Joe Biden is simply too old to run for reelection. This week on Sea Change Radio, we hear from John Stoehr, the Editor and Founder of The Editorial Board, to get his insights into the 2024 presidential election. We look at some of the calls from media members like Ezra Klein and Nate Silver for Biden to step aside, discuss how Republicans are taking a much bigger leap of faith by re-nominating Donald Trump, and counter some of the critics with practical arguments for why the Democrats might want to stick with Joe Biden as their nominee in August. Narrator | 00:02 - This is Sea Change Radio covering the shift to sustainability. I'm Alex Wise. John Stoehr (JS) | 00:17 - We already have a consensus candidate. Joe Biden was the consensus candidate of 2020. He is the consensus candidate Now as the incumbent. You don't need to ditch the consensus candidate to come up with another consensus candidate. It doesn't make any sense. Narrator | 00:35 - Sometimes it seems as though Democrats are more determined to "fall in love" than to win elections. Lately I've been hearing, from both pundits and friends, that Joe Biden is simply too old to run for reelection. This week on Sea Change Radio, we hear from John Stoehr, the Editor and Founder of The Editorial Board, to get his insights into the 2024 presidential election. We look at some of the calls from media members like Ezra Klein and Nate Silver for Biden to step aside, discuss how Republicans are taking a much bigger leap of faith by re-nominating Donald Trump, and counter some of the critics with practical arguments for why the Democrats might want to stick with Joe Biden as their nominee in August. Alex Wise (AW) | 01:28 - I'm joined now on Sea Change Radio by John Storr. He is the editor and founder of The Editorial Board. John, welcome back to Sea Change Radio. John Stoehr (JS) | 01:42 - Thanks for having me back. Alex. Alex Wise (AW) | 01:44 - Always a pleasure to talk to you, my friend. You wrote a piece that was a perfect response to the many people who've spoken to me over the last few months, clutching their pearls. Very concerned that Joe Biden is not going to be the nominee, or needs to not be the nominee. Many variations on this, and this all came to a head recently when Ezra Klein wrote an op-Ed for the New York Times, as well as putting it on his podcast, a special monologue where he laid out his plan for Joe Biden to step aside, be a hero, do the right thing, and, and let somebody else run against Donald Trump. You wrote a piece in The Editorial Board entitled Critics Calling on Biden to Drop Out are not thinking it through. So let's go down this path together and make a collective case for these people who want to discuss the possibility of Joe Biden Stepping Aside. JS | 02:44 - Right. So we're to begin with this, um, I think it's one. Okay. So we begin with why are people worried? Right? And people are worried because, uh, there are many polls, poll after poll that suggest that Biden is quote unquote losing or trailing to Donald Trump. AW | 03:07 - And similar polls, I don't know how they phrase them, phrase the questions, but often say, is Joe Biden too old for president? And 86% will say “Yes,” et cetera. JS | 03:19 - Yes. Right. And so let's take, let's take those two questions. Here's what we do know is that these two questions seem to be related. Uh, so people seem to say that Biden's too old, and so therefore he shouldn't run for president, or he's too old and that's why he's trailing Donald Trump. However, those two questions are not empirically linked because they can't be. It's a leap of logic. AW | 03:40 - Yes. Explain that a little bit more. You break that down in your piece quite well. JS | 03:44 - Yeah. I mean, it's just a matter,

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Standing On The Shoulders of Giants: Dara O’Rourke and Corwin Hardham

2/13/2024
This week on Sea Change Radio, we dig into the archives to revisit a couple of discussions with sustainability innovators whose ideas never took full flight but can continue to inspire us nonetheless. First, we hear from Dara O’Rourke, the CEO of Good Guide, a really great idea for improving product transparency for consumers which sadly shut down in 2020. Then, we speak with Corwin Hardham, the CEO of solar kite company Makani Power, who tragically passed away in 2012 at the age of 38, only one year after this Sea Change Radio interview.

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Chris Nelder on Energy Transitions

2/6/2024
The transition from fossil fuels to a cleaner energy future is perhaps the most important human adaptation of our lifetime. This week on Sea Change Radio, we speak with Chris Nelder about his mission to take a deep dive into energy, on a fortnightly basis, as the host of the Energy Transition Show podcast. We discuss his travels as a digital nomad, look at some of the energy stories he's been covering, and get into a larger conversation about what needs to happen to see this transition through. Narrator | 00:02 - This is Sea Change Radio covering the shift to sustainability. I'm Alex Wise. Chris Nelder (CN) | 00:15 - The more I've studied this stuff, the more it has become clear to me that there's no technical or economic reason why we shouldn't do the energy transition or why it can't work. We have the technology, it's very affordable. In most cases, it's far cheaper than remaining on the existing fossil fuel systems that we use. It's cheaper than nuclear for sure. So there's really no reason why we can't or shouldn't do it, except for politics. Narrator | 00:45 - The transition from fossil fuels to a cleaner energy future is perhaps the most important human adaptation of our lifetime. This week on Sea Change Radio, we speak with Chris Nelder about his mission to take a deep dive into energy, on a fortnightly basis, as the host of the Energy Transition Show podcast. We discuss his travels as a digital nomad, look at some of the energy stories he's been covering, and get into a larger conversation about what needs to happen to see this transition through. Alex Wise (AW) | 01:35 - I am joined now on Sea Change Radio by Chris Nelder. Chris is the host of the Energy Transition Show podcast. Chris, welcome to Sea Change Radio. Chris Nelder (CN) | 01:44 - Thanks very much. Alex Wise (AW) | 01:45 - So, tell us about the Energy Transition Show. I'd like to know more about how you got into it and what problems you're trying to solve through it. Chris Nelder (CN) | 01:56 - Well, my partner, Justin Richie, pitched me on doing this show and, we've been doing the show for about eight and a half years now. And the whole concept of it really was to create the kind of energy podcast that I wanted to listen to because I was really disappointed with what I felt like was just sort of shallow, poorly structured, poorly researched content that was available in, in a lot of the other podcasts. And I'm a geek, I'm a serious energy geek, and I've been studying energy intensely full-time for the better part of 20 years. And so I wanted to make a show that was for people like me that really want to geek out on, the details and really understand sort of the complex, thorny issues involved in the energy transition. And, and there's a lot of them. Policy is complex. The technologies are complex. The way that these changes that we're experiencing through the energy transition affects the world, are very complex and so I want to do a show about all those things and with the intention of really motivating other people to participate in the energy transition however they can. Alex Wise (AW) | 03:02 - When somebody who is not very familiar with the term energy transition asks you what your show is about and what, what does that mean energy transition, how do you define that to them? CN | 03:13 - I mean, the simplest way of putting it, I think is, um, getting off of fossil fuels and, and moving over to, uh, renewables as a way of powering the world and all the, all the different purposes we have for energy. Of course, it's more complex than that. There are various kinds of what people call clean energy solutions that aren't necessarily based on renewables. But as time goes on in the energy transition progresses, it's becoming more clear. I think that really what we're talking about is a switch to renewables. Primarily it's about eliminating carbon emissions. It's about transforming our society in that way so that we can address th...

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Jacob Vigdor: College Admissions Quandries

1/30/2024
Whether it be standardized testing, grades, extracurricular activities or personal essays, the question of how to level the playing field in education is quite a challenge. This week on Sea Change Radio, we take a deep dive into higher education admissions and inequities in this country with Jacob Vigdor, a Professor of Public Policy and Governance at the University of Washington. We discuss the flawed measures we use to evaluate teenage pupils and ask what the goals should actually be for college admissions officers? Are we looking for students to get good grades and make a lot of money, or become leaders in their communities and help spark thoughtful debate among their peers? We examine the shortcomings of standardized testing and grades, explore admissions systems at most “elite" schools, and try to come up with some solutions to the problem. Narrator | 00:02 - This is Sea Change Radio covering the shift to sustainability. I'm Alex Wise. Jacob Vigdor (JV) | 00:23 - If you ask the question, could an elite college find the students who have the academic foundation to be successful at their institution without standardized test scores? The answer is an unambiguous resounding yes. Narrator | 00:42 - Whether it be standardized testing grades, extracurricular activities, or personal essays, the question of how to level the playing field in education is quite a challenge. This week on Sea Change Radio, we take a deep dive into higher education, admissions and inequities in this country with Jacob Vigdor, a professor of Public Policy and Governance at the University of Washington. We discussed the flawed measures we use to evaluate teenage pupils and ask what the goals should actually be for college admissions officers. Are we looking for students to get good grades and make a lot of money, or become leaders in their communities and help spark thoughtful debate among their peers? We examine the shortcomings of standardized testing and grades, explore admission systems at most, quote unquote elite schools, and try to come up with some solutions to the problem. Alex Wise (AW) | 01:55 - I am joined now on Sea Change Radio by Jacob Vigdor. He is a professor of public policy and governance at the University of Washington. Jake, welcome to Sea Change Radio. Jacob Vigdor (JV) | 02:05 - Thanks for having me. Alex. Great to be here. Alex Wise (AW) | 02:08 - It's a pleasure to talk to you. I read a Twitter thread of yours that addressed an article by New York Times columnist David Leonhardt, saying that colleges have been missing standardized testing, and that there's strong evidence that it's actually a, a very good predictor of grades and performance in college, and that colleges don't know what to do now that universities have decided not to make it a requirement in the application process or at least many universities. I, I don't know if that's an accurate summary, but why don't you expand on Leonhardt's piece and then explain where he kind of cherry picked, if you will, the statistics to fit his narrative. Jacob Vigdor (JV) | 02:54 - Sure. Yeah. So the way I, I'd summarize the argument is, you know, the SAT is a predictor of how a student is going to do in college. And really the, the biggest concern is that there are certain students out there who maybe they're going to a rural high school, maybe they don't have access to the same kinds of resources. So, you know, they might be going to a high school that doesn't offer a whole lot of AP courses. They might be going to a high school where the counselors don't know how to write good recommendation letters for elite colleges. And so these are students that are at risk of falling off the radar screen of the admissions officers at Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Brown, wherever. But the SAT score is something that could, that could flag them as a student with real potential. So the idea being that maybe you're looking at an application,

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Daniel Kammen: The Perils of Deep-Sea Mining

1/23/2024
Most of us have never been there but according to a quick Google search, some of the things you might see at the bottom of the ocean include sea spiders, tube worms, and something called a blob sculpin. Add to that list: heavy equipment for mining rare earth minerals like cobalt and manganese. This week on Sea Change Radio, we speak with Daniel Kammen, an energy professor at the University of California at Berkeley, about deep-sea mining. We learn about this segment of the extraction industry, consider the environmental hazards, and examine why it's largely unnecessary. We also take a look at the promise of growing rare minerals like perovskites in laboratories, and discuss the recent Sunnylands Climate Agreement between the U.S. and China. Narrator | 00:02 - This is Sea Change Radio covering the shift to sustainability. I'm Alex Wise. Daniel Kammen (DK) | 00:25 - Cobalt as mined today, either in the Congo, where most, most of it comes from, or um, from the seabed, is hugely problematic and damaging. Narrator | 00:37 - Most of us have never been there but according to a quick Google search, some of the things you might see at the bottom of the ocean include sea spiders, tube worms, and something called a blob sculpin. Add to that list: heavy equipment for mining rare earth minerals like cobalt and manganese. This week on Sea Change Radio, we speak with Daniel Kammen, an energy professor at the University of California at Berkeley, about deep-sea mining. We learn about this segment of the extraction industry, consider the environmental hazards, and examine why it's largely unnecessary. We also take a look at the promise of growing rare minerals like perovskites in laboratories, and discuss the recent Sunnylands Climate Agreement between the U.S. and China. Alex Wise (AW) | 01:46 - I'm joined now on Sea Change Radio by Daniel Kammen. He is a Professor of Energy at UC Berkeley, and a former science envoy for President Obama. Dan, welcome back to Sea Change Radio. Daniel Kammen (DK) | 01:57 - Thanks for having me back on. I really appreciate it. Alex Wise (AW) | 02:00 - Always a pleasure. I wanted you to summarize the white paper that you presented at COP 28 in Dubai. It was entitled, “Next Generation EV Batteries Eliminate the Need for Deep-Sea Mining.” So first, what is deep-sea mining and what's the problem that it presents? Daniel Kammen (DK) | 02:19 - So, deep-seabed mining is in my view, kind of one of the scariest crossover issues between the old energy economy and the new energy economy. And by that what I mean is that we've known about seabed mining for a long time. In fact, Howard Hughes was, one of the many ways he was famous was he constructed a boat, the Glomar Explorer that was ostensibly supposed to be harvesting these nodules of rare earth metals, manganese, cobalt, a variety of things from the sea floor. And they're about the size of tennis balls or softballs. They grow very slowly, um, at low temperature and, and, and high pressure and he had this boat that was designed to go do that. But in fact, we now know decades later that the Glomar Explorer was actually a CIA front and it was a front to go and try to pull a sunken Russian submarine off the bottom of the ocean. AW | 03:15 - This was not in the white paper, but this is very interesting

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Darren Samuelsohn: Untangling Trump’s Trials

1/16/2024
The self-proclaimed "greatest country on earth" is in an unfathomable position. Heavily favored to win the Republican Party's nomination for president is a man found guilty of rape and fraud in civil courts and facing nearly 100 felony counts in criminal proceedings. This week on Sea Change Radio, we speak to Darren Samuelsohn, a longtime Washington reporter from The Messenger who will give us a useful overview of the 44th President's various and sundry legal wranglings. We sort through the labyrinthian timelines of the cases, discuss how these trials paradoxically seem to solidify Trump's support among Republicans, and look at how the complex web of a former president's criminality has stretched all three branches of the United States Government paper thin. Narrator | 00:02 - This is Sea Change Radio, covering the shift to sustainability. I'm Alex Wise. Darren Samuelsohn (DS) | 00:14 - Where do these criminal trials factor into people's attentions? The political discourse in the, in the general election campaign, I mean, we never experienced anything like this as a country before. Narrator | 00:27 - The self-proclaimed “greatest country on earth” is in an unfathomable position. Heavily favored to win the Republican Party’s nomination for president is a man found guilty of rape and fraud in civil courts and facing nearly 100 felony counts in criminal proceedings. This week on Sea Change Radio, we speak to Darren Samuelsohn, a longtime Washington reporter from The Messenger who will give us a useful overview of the 44th President’s various and sundry legal wranglings. We sort through the labyrinthian timelines of the cases, discuss how these trials paradoxically seem to solidify Trump’s support among Republicans, and look at how the complex web of a former president’s criminality has stretched all three branches of the United States Government paper thin. Alex Wise (AW) | 01:25 I am joined now on Sea Change Radio by Darren Samuelsohn. He is a senior editor at The Messenger. Darren, welcome to Sea Change Radio. Darren Samuelsohn (DS) | 01:37 - Thanks for having me. Alex Wise (AW) | 01:38 - It's a pleasure to have you covering the 44th President's legal machinations as a political junkie. I'm sure you didn't see yourself 10, 15 years ago being up in the weeds trying to understand many, many legal terms, and that's an expert like yourself. You can imagine how consumers of media are confused. And so that's why I wanted to have you on to try to break down some of Trump's legal troubles right now. And just trying to track the Trump criminal cases. We have the federal election interference case. We have the Georgia election interference case. We have the classified documents case, and then the hush money case. These are the criminal cases. And then there's also the civil case with E. Jean Carroll. And is there another one that I'm forgetting? Darren Samuelsohn (DS) | 02:29 - There's definitely one other big one. That's the civil trial in New York City, uh, where Trump's company is on the line, right? Uh, with, uh, you know, a trial that took place, basically the last quarter of 2023 was occupied by Donald Trump showing up in court, day in and day out in, in Manhattan. Uh, where soon gonna have that case kicked to the judge where he'll be issuing his ruling. Uh, there are appeals ongoing as well, so this is not gonna be over anytime soon. Alex Wise (AW) | 02:54 -So that's six cases, right? DS | 02:56 - That's at least six. And there's, there, there are other civil cases also, uh, that are happening. And then myriad tangential things to everything that we just discussed, because now the United States Supreme Court is involved on a ton of really big, high profile, big questions that connect directly to everything that you just laid out there. So, I mean, to your original point, Donald Trump, yeah, he's testing the system to no end, and it's happening every day. It's been that way ever since. He, you know,

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Bob Berwyn of Inside Climate News on COP28

1/9/2024
COP28, or the 28th meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Climate Change Conference, took place recently in the United Arab Emirates. With representation from nearly every country in the world, COP28 is the most important annual climate summit in the world. This week on Sea Change Radio, we talk with Bob Berwyn of Inside Climate News who went to Dubai to cover the conference. We discuss the goals of the summit, talk about the irony of holding an environmental conference in one of the world's largest oil producing countries, and look at some of the key takeaways from COP28. Narrator | 00:02 - This is Sea Change Radio covering the shift to sustainability. I'm Alex Wise. Bob Berwyn (BB) | 00:19 - These are serious people who politically represent island nations, and they're saying, “you know, I'm not gonna sign my own death warrant.” Narrator | 00:29 - COP 28 or the 28th meeting of the conference of the parties to the United Nations Climate Change Conference took place recently in the United Arab Emirates with representation from nearly every country in the world. COP 28 is the most important annual climate summit in the world. This week on Sea Change Radio, we talk with Bob Berwyn of Inside Climate News, who went to Dubai to cover the conference. We discussed the goals of the summit, talk about the irony of holding an environmental conference in one of the world's largest oil producing countries, and look at some of the key takeaways from COP 28. Alex Wise (AW) | 01:37 - I am joined now on Sea Change Radio by Bob Berwyn. Bob is a reporter at Inside Climate News. Bob, welcome to Sea Change Radio. Bob Berwyn (BB) | 01:46 - Hi, Alex. Thanks for having me, and it's nice to be back. Alex Wise (AW) | 01:49 - I wanted to have you on again because you just got back from the COP 28 Climate Summit in Dubai, and I wanted to get your reactions to what it was like being there, and then break down some of the policies that were discussed as well. Why don't you first walk us through what it's like to go to a climate summit in one of the capitals of the fossil fuel industry? BB | 02:13 - Yeah, so it's the annual conference of parties under the United Nations framework on Climate Change Convention, which is not a phrase that really rolls off the tongue very easily. It's really a bunch of jargon, and we've come to to call them cops. And this was the 28th COP and was held in Dubai from November 30th to December 12th, and as you said, in the heart of fossil fuel country. And it's a very interesting and actually disconcerting juxtaposition of concepts, you know, on the one hand of trying to address a climate crisis that's, that's, uh, caused by burning fossil fuels, coal, oil, and gas, primarily, I think 80% or close to 90% of all the carbon dioxide in the atmosphere that's heating the planet comes from burning fossil fuels. And so it's clearly at the heart of the problem, yet it's never been mentioned officially in a, in a COP document specifically by the term fossil fuels. AW | 03:21 - Yes. How did that duck under previous 27 cops, without mentioning the phrase fossil fuels? BB | 03:27 - Well, it's because the, the oil barons and the carbon cowboys have had a big important seed at the table all along. It turns out. Um, but Dubai itself is just, you know, really a, a sort of a symbol of the, of the excess of this fossil fueled extreme capitalism that's based on consumption, that's actually driving the problem. That's what's causing this incredible surge of greenhouse gas emissions. 50% of all greenhouse gases in the air have been emitted since the first COP, um, you know, as compared to 50% in the 150 years before that. So, wait a minute, what's going on here? Um, and, and you have a chief executive of a, of a major oil company as the sort of the presiding officer over the, over the proceedings, you know, and you walk down the street, you could rent Maseratis by the hour,

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Namrata Chowdhary: Three (50) Is A Magic Number (re-broadcast)

1/2/2024
In the first decade of this century many of us learned that the threshold for keeping our planet healthy was 350 parts per million of carbon dioxide. Advocates like those at 350.org emphasized the need to adopt practices to help the earth stay below that number. Well, unfortunately, we earthlings have blown through that limit and are presently looking at 419 parts per million. But that doesn’t mean the idea of lowering our carbon emissions is moribund. And there are still organizations like 350.org keeping the dream alive. This week on Sea Change Radio, we speak to Namrata Chowdhary, the Head of Public Engagement at 350.org. We learn more about the organization’s roots, examine some of the fights they’ve taken on, and discuss how they’re planning to evolve. We also talk about the corporatization of some larger environmental organizations and dive into the issues surrounding fossil fuel divestiture. 00:02 Narrator – This is Sea Change Radio covering the shift to sustainability. I’m Alex Wise. 00:15 Namrata Chowdhary (NC) – Yes, in the Global North we need to acknowledge that there’s a gap in how we people the climate movement, and at the same time, we need to acknowledge that and environmentalism has held different forms in different parts of the world for decades longer. 00:33 Narrator – In the first decade of this century many of us learned that the threshold for keeping our planet healthy was 350 parts per million of carbon dioxide. Advocates like those at 350.org emphasized the need to adopt practices to help the earth stay below that number. Well, unfortunately, we earthlings have blown through that limit and are presently looking at 419 parts per million. But that doesn’t mean the idea of lowering our carbon emissions is moribund. And there are still organizations like 350.org keeping the dream alive. This week on Sea Change Radio, we speak to Namrata Chowdhary, the Head of Public Engagement at 350.org. We learn more about the organization’s roots, examine some of the fights they’ve taken on, and discuss how they’re planning to evolve. We also talk about the corporatization of some larger environmental organizations and dive into the issues surrounding fossil fuel divestiture. 01:43 Alex Wise (AW) – I’m joined now on Sea Change Radio by Namrata Chowdhary. She is the head of public engagement at 350.org. Namrata, welcome to Sea Change Radio. 01:54 Namrata Chowdhary (NC) – Thank you ever so much, it’s a pleasure to be here. 01:56 Alex Wise (AW) – Pleasure to have you. You are coming to us from London, is that correct? 02:00 NC – That is correct. On a grey, cold day one wouldn’t believe it’s spring. 02:06 AW – First, why don’t you give us a bit of a background for our listeners who are not familiar with the mission of your organization and give us a little bit of the history and then we’ll catch up listeners on how the organization has evolved over the years. 02:21 NC – What a beautiful invitation to share about the history of an organization that I’ve long admired before I became part of it. 350.org was founded in 2008 by Bill McKibben, whom you’ve had on your show before, and a group of university friends who were his students at the time, and it’s named after – we are named after – the safe limits of 350 parts per million of carbon in the atmosphere. And that’s what we’re hoping to – or determined to, I should say – determined to get the earth back towards. We need to bring ourselves back to 350 parts of one million. The roots of 350 are very firmly in the activist sphere. It started with youth activists and today still we draw our primary strength from the young activists at the front lines, many of whom are at the front lines of the climate crisis and all of whom are committed to doing their part to changing the narrative of fossil fuels as the only way to bring energy to us. And are determined to do what they can to secure a more positive, uplifting, safe future for all.

Duration:00:29:00