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The Next Reel Film Podcast

Film

A show about movies and how they connect with Andy Nelson and Pete Wright. The Next Reel has been dedicated to reviews, news, and commentary on world film for a decade. This podcast is The Next Reel master feed including all the episodes of The Next Reel, Trailer Rewind, The Film Board, The Speakeasy, and the other shorts, interviews, and specials we've produced over the years. This show is part of the Spreaker Prime Network, if you are interested in advertising on this podcast, contact us at https://www.spreaker.com/show/5640170/advertisement

Location:

United States

Description:

A show about movies and how they connect with Andy Nelson and Pete Wright. The Next Reel has been dedicated to reviews, news, and commentary on world film for a decade. This podcast is The Next Reel master feed including all the episodes of The Next Reel, Trailer Rewind, The Film Board, The Speakeasy, and the other shorts, interviews, and specials we've produced over the years. This show is part of the Spreaker Prime Network, if you are interested in advertising on this podcast, contact us at https://www.spreaker.com/show/5640170/advertisement

Twitter:

@thenextreel

Language:

English


Episodes

Anna and the King of Siam • The Next Reel

8/31/2023
“That king certainly hasn’t very good manners.”The Less-Singing, More Burnings VersionAudiences have been fascinated with the life of Anna Leonowens and her time spent in Thailand (then Siam) teaching English to King Mongkut’s wives and children. What’s the draw though? Perhaps the story of a woman on her own in a foreign country? Or a common person who is swept up into a world of royalty and has the ear of a king. Hard to say, but it’s a fascinating story, even if it does feel one-sided. Join us – Pete Wright and Andy Nelson – as we kick off our 1947 Academy Award Best Writing, Screenplay nominee series with a conversation about John Cromwell’s 1946 film Anna and the King of Siam. Here’s a hint at what we talk about.The first hurdle with this film is the rough brownface that all the actors playing the people of Siam wear. Yes, it’s from the era – we acknowledge that. That doesn’t make it any easier to take. There are also all the other trappings that go along with this element – pidgin English, playing the characters as simpler people, etc. It’s frustrating. Once you can get past that, there are still the story elements dealing with colonialism and the entire idea of a white woman (savior?) coming in to teach English to the children and wives of King Mongkut along with the British way so they can all act more civilized. It’s a struggle, but at the same time, teachers teach. She’s just doing her job, right? Past all the struggles, there is the core of the story involving the complex relationship between Anna and King Mongkut. Irene Dunne and Rex Harrison are great in their roles, and we enjoy the back and forth that we get with them as they initially try to figure each other out and test each other, pushing boundaries, then eventually becoming trusted friends. We discuss the other players, the story and how this iteration differs from other versions, how Cromwell directed it, the look of it, and more. There’s a lot to discuss with this one. We have a great time talking about it, so check it out then tune in. The Next Reel – when the movie ends, our conversation begins! Join the conversation with movie lovers from around the world on The Next Reel’s Discord channel! Film SundriesLearn more about supporting The Next Reel Film Podcast through your own membership.AppleAmazonJustWatchScript OptionsFlickers In Time’s reviewTheatrical trailerPoster artworkFlickchartLetterboxd This show is part of the Spreaker Prime Network, if you are interested in advertising on this podcast, contact us at https://www.spreaker.com/show/5640170/advertisement

Duration:00:53:54

The Reflecting Skin • A Conversation with Storyboard and Concept Artist Anson Jew • Movies We Like

8/28/2023
“Any vampires around these parts, Pa?”Talking About The Reflecting Skin with our guest, storyboard and concept artist Anson JewThere’s a lot going on in this story of childhood. It’s a story about vampirism and nuclear devastation. It’s about a town’s secrets and the perspective of children. Homosexuality in a time when it was far from being accepted. Dealing with loss. Growing old. Finding love. Writer/director Philip Ridley not only crafted a gorgeous film that’s alive from start to finish, but he crafted a story about childhood that captures all the strangeness and complexity we should expect and want in a story about a kid making his way in the world. Storyboard and concept artist Anson Jew joins us to talk about this film, which has stuck with him since he first saw it. It’s a fantastic film and one certainly worth discussing. We have a great time talking with Anson about it, so check it out then tune in. Join the conversation with movie lovers from around the world on The Next Reel’s Discord channel! Film SundriesLearn more about supporting The Next Reel’s Movies We Like through your own membership with The Next Reel.FacebookInstagramTwitterIMDbhis websiteAppleAmazonJustWatchTranscriptTheatrical trailerPoster artworkFlickchartLetterboxd This show is part of the Spreaker Prime Network, if you are interested in advertising on this podcast, contact us at https://www.spreaker.com/show/5640170/advertisement

Duration:00:59:06

Callsheet • Behind the Sites with Casey Liss

8/25/2023
Welcome back to Behind the Sites, a long-overdue return to one of our favorite series here at The Next Reel. This series celebrates the technology behind the entertainment industry... specifically, the sites and apps we use to learn about the movies and shows of which we call ourselves fans. Casey Liss is a podcaster, developer, and writer from Richmond, Virginia. However, these days, it might be hard to know in which order to put those things. He's one-third of the Accidental Tech Podcast, a must-listen for principled nerds, and half of Analog(ue) on Relay FM. But he's here today to talk about his latest app, Callsheet, an entertainment industry search experience that might just earn a prized spot on the home screen of your phone. Along the way, Casey talks about the challenges that come with attempting to peel back the features of an existing monolith in order to create an app that is fast, yet still seemingly feature-complete. We talk about what goes into working on an app that is dependent on a third-party API in an era that has rendered API a dirty, profit-seeking word. Oh, and we talk about Plex. For members, we talk a lot about Plex. Links & NotesCallsheetCallsheet on the App StoreThe Movie DatabaseTheMovieDB APIcheck out this episode and let's get ripping! This show is part of the Spreaker Prime Network, if you are interested in advertising on this podcast, contact us at https://www.spreaker.com/show/5640170/advertisement

Duration:00:35:27

Wuthering Heights • The Next Reel

8/24/2023
”No matter what I ever do or say, Heathcliff, this is me – now – standing on this hill with you. This is me, forever.”My, My, My... Those Heights, They Are A-Wuthering...Adapting Emily Brontë’s novel for the big screen isn’t an easy task, but it’s one that many people have taken on as “Wuthering Heights” has been adapted for the big or small screen over 30 times. And that doesn’t even take into account the operas, plays, musicals, radio adaptations, and more. As popular as the novel is, it’s a challenging one, and that’s certainly on display with William Wyler’s 1939 adaptation. It used less than half the chapters and hence modified many elements for the ending. Still, it works. In fact, we might even feel it works better than the novel. Join us – Pete Wright and Andy Nelson – as we wrap up our 1940 Academy Award Best Picture Nominee series with a conversation about Wyler’s 1939 film Wuthering Heights. Here’s a hint at what we talk about.There’s a lot left out, but the book is a challenging read and we feel that this adaptation captures the essence of the tragic romance, leaving out a lot of the more complex elements that work well on the page but not so much on the big screen. It’s still not our favorite, but with director Wyler helming it, we find plenty to connect to. The performers are all delivering big but portrayals that work well with this big romance. Laurence Olivier and Merle Oberon may not have gotten along on set but they work well as Heathcliff and Cathy. We also love David Niven and Geraldine Fitzgerald. In the scope of adaptation, the film leaves in some of the framing device that’s quite important for the novel. Here, we’re not so sure it’s needed. In fact, it largely feels like an unnecessary appendage. The cinematography by Gregg Toland paired with Wyler’s effective direction bring life to the film. The black-and-white cinematography is full of darks and lights. It certainly deserved its Oscar win. And Alfred Newman’s beautiful score brings the tragic romance elements to the story right to the forefront. These elements all buoy the film for us, which otherwise may not be our cup of tea as much as some of the other Best Picture nominees. Speaking of, we do walk through the 10 nominees and debate which we’d pick to win. We have a great time talking about it, so check it out then tune in. The Next Reel – when the movie ends, our conversation begins! Join the conversation with movie lovers from around the world on The Next Reel’s Discord channel! Film SundriesLearn more about supporting The Next Reel Film Podcast through your own membership.AppleAmazonJustWatchTranscriptTheatrical trailerPoster artworkFlickchartLetterboxd This show is part of the Spreaker Prime Network, if you are interested in advertising on this podcast, contact us at https://www.spreaker.com/show/5640170/advertisement

Duration:01:12:26

Of Mice and Men • The Next Reel

8/17/2023
“I remember about the rabbits, George.”Capturing Steinbeck and Americana on the Big ScreenHaving been writing novels for 10 years, it made sense that eventually, Hollywood would turn to John Steinbeck’s novels as a source for the silver screen. The first film to make the transition was Of Mice and Men, a novella he originally wrote as a ‘playable novel’ and then as a play itself. To that end, it was already the perfect size for adapting. And to that end, the film works just as well as the story. Join us – Pete Wright and Andy Nelson – as we continue our series on 1940 Academy Award Best Picture nominees with a conversation about Lewis Milestone’s 1939 film Of Mice and Men. Here’s a hint at what we talk about.For a relatively simple story, a lot happens and the story works through a variety of topics. How does the story handle a character with an intellectual disability and what does it say about those who take care of others, whether it’s this character or an aging dog? What about race relations? (To that end, it may be less pointed than the book but the film still feels like it handles race better than Gone With The Wind does.) The script changes how Mae – the only female character in the book and the only one with any real presence in the film – fits into the story. Here, we get a sense of the tragedy of this character, which does a lot to paint the gender differences in this place at this time. There’s also the moralistic, religious, and humanistic angles we discuss. The casting is fantastic. Burgess Meredith and Lon Chaney, Jr. play our two leads and deliver complex, compassionate performances that are the beating heart of this film. Betty Field plays Mae and rounds the character out with resonance and depth that never were on Steinbeck’s pages, even if possibly inferred. The rest of the cast fits impeccably into their roles. Lewis Milestone directs and handles the story effectively and efficiently. And having Aaron Copeland score the film only enhances its feel of Americana. This film stands strong as a version of this film that’s worth remembering. It’s definitely one of the best films of the year and certainly worthy of its Best Picture nomination. We have a great time talking about it, so check it out then tune in. The Next Reel – when the movie ends, our conversation begins! Join the conversation with movie lovers from around the world on The Next Reel’s Discord channel! Film Sundriesyour own membershipJustWatchTranscriptTheatrical trailerPoster artworkLetterboxd This show is part of the Spreaker Prime Network, if you are interested in advertising on this podcast, contact us at https://www.spreaker.com/show/5640170/advertisement

Duration:01:03:22

Love Affair • The Next Reel

8/10/2023
“We’re heading into rough seas, Michel.”A Love Story That Stands the Test of Time It’s interesting that Leo McCarey’s 1939 film Love Affair largely fell into obscurity due to both slipping into the public domain and to McCarey’s own remake in 1957 as An Affair to Remember. It largely was thanks to Nora Ephron including mention of both films in her 1993 classic Sleepless in Seattle that interest in this original rose again. Now, thanks to a stunning restoration in 2020, the film looks brand new and is certainly worth discovery, or re-discovery. Join us – Pete Wright and Andy Nelson – as we continue our series on the 1940 Academy Awards • Best Picture nominees with a conversation about McCarey’s 1939 film Love Affair. Here’s a hint at what we talk about. We both were more familiar with the story from McCarey’s 1957 remake An Affair to Remember starring Cary Grant and Deborah Kerr, but the core of the story remains largely unchanged. That even holds true in Warren Beatty’s mess of a remake in 1994 (also called Love Affair), which says something about the strength in the story. We have a few issues with the story, however – the need to wait six months before seeing each other again to prove they’re able to survive on their own seems a bit plotted, and Terry’s desire to not tell Michel about her accident until she’s able to walk to him seems thin. But are they? There’s clearly meaning behind their motivations in both cases. Is it just that we actually want it spelled out more, which we rarely actually want? Or is it that we don’t quite feel they sell it? It’s hard to gauge, so in the end these points don’t break things for us. They just give us pause. It’s hard to get past that ending though. It’s perfect and just rips your heart out before putting it right back. Amazing stuff. There’s a reason it’s become iconic. And how great are Irene Dunne and Charles Boyer? We discuss them a bit in relation to Grant and Kerr. Who works better for us? Leo McCarey was stepping away from his comedies. How does he do with this material? We also talk about the controversies with the script and why the production code wouldn’t pass it initially. And let’s not forget the songs!It’s a great film and easily one to fall in love with. We have a great time talking about it, so check it out then tune in. The Next Reel – when the movie ends, our conversation begins!Join the conversation with movie lovers from around the world on The Next Reel’s Discord channel!Film Sundries Learn more about supporting The Next Reel Film Podcast through your own membership.AmazonJustWatchScript OptionsTheatrical trailerPoster artworkFlickchartLetterboxd This show is part of the Spreaker Prime Network, if you are interested in advertising on this podcast, contact us at https://www.spreaker.com/show/5640170/advertisement

Duration:00:52:08

Dark Victory • The Next Reel

8/3/2023
“When you get inside my head, see if you can find any sense in it.”Bette Davis Dealing with and Dying From GliomaThere’s a strength in storytelling that can exist in disease films because we’re following a person as they’re going through a very difficult period in their life that could very well end in death. That’s one of the elements that drew Bette Davis to the play “Dark Victory,” of which she had a hard time convincing Jack Warner that audiences would love it. He was wrong and she proved correctly, however, that a tragic story with your protagonist dying from the disease could draw in the audience. It clearly worked in this case as it lead to several Academy Award nominations including Best Picture. Join us – Pete Wright and Andy Nelson – as we kick off our 13th season of the podcast with a full year looking at various awards categories through the decades, starting right here in our series on the 1940 Academy Awards • Best Picture as we discuss Edmund Goulding’s 1939 film Dark Victory. Here’s a hint at what we talk about.At the heart of this film, it’s really Bette Davis and she fully delivers. She’s very much playing the headstrong socialite we’d see often in her films, though the difference here is right out of the gate, she’s diagnosed with glioma, a form of brain tumor. Through her performance, we see her go through many of the stages of grief as she first fights against the fact that she’s sick and finally comes to terms and accepts it. It’s quite a ride, and it works because of Davis. She couldn’t get there without the script, however, and its structure allows this film to be about her battling the disease, not as a side element in the story. From the start, she’s suffering from her glioma. It plays in unexpected ways, and lets us take the journey with her. Of course the journey wouldn’t be complete without the rest of the players, and they deliver. Geraldine Fitzgerald, George Brent, Ronald Reagan. Only Humphrey Bogart seems out of place here. It’s a strong entry into the big studio year of 1939 that saw a lot of successful films of all genres stand out, and this one deservedly was nominated for Best Picture. We have a great time talking about it, so check it out then tune in. The Next Reel – when the movie ends, our conversation begins! Join the conversation with movie lovers from around the world on The Next Reel’s Discord channel! Film SundriesLearn more about supporting The Next Reel Film Podcast through your own membership.AppleAmazonJustWatchTranscriptOriginal MaterialTheatrical trailerPoster artworkFlickchartLetterboxd This show is part of the Spreaker Prime Network, if you are interested in advertising on this podcast, contact us at https://www.spreaker.com/show/5640170/advertisement

Duration:00:56:54

The Thin Red Line • A Conversation with Cinematographer Ross Riege • Movies We Like

7/31/2023
See the list for our entire lineup for SEASON 13 on our Letterboxd page! “We're living in a world that's blowing itself to hell as fast as everybody can arrange it.”Talking About Terrence Malick’s 1998 film The Thin Red Line with our guest, cinematographer Ross RiegeWhile Terrence Malick’s war film came out five months after Steven Spielberg’s Saving Private Ryan, it couldn’t be more different. They’re both exceptional films, but Malick’s takes a more pensive, thoughtful, esoteric approach with his. At its basest level, the story follows a military unit on the Melanesian island of Guadalcanal as they work to take it from Japanese troops. While that story’s there, in Malick’s hands, the film is more about the balance between man and nature and how the war machine destroys men’s souls. Not only is the way Malick crafts the story haunting, it’s also done in a way that fits perfectly with his themes and views. Cinematographer Ross Riege is a big fan, having first seen this and a number of other Malick films when prepping Redland, an early film he worked on, as well as his big break as cinematographer for The Kings of Summer. It’s fitting then that that film’s look was described as feeling Malickian. We talk more with Riege about his career, starting with smaller films and moving up to films like Weird: The Al Yankovic Story and the TV series The Afterparty. We also get some impressions from him on the switch from film to digital, working with his crews, and more. It’s a fantastic conversation about a great movie with a great cinematographer. Film Sundriesyour own membershipThe Next Reel’s Discord channelon the webon InstagramAppleAmazonJustWatchScript OptionsTheatrical trailerPoster artworkFlickchartLetterboxd This show is part of the Spreaker Prime Network, if you are interested in advertising on this podcast, contact us at https://www.spreaker.com/show/5640170/advertisement

Duration:01:06:40

The Wizard of Oz • Rebroadcast • The Next Reel

7/27/2023
"Toto, I’ve a feeling we’re not in Kansas anymore!"REBROADCASTStill a ClassicVictor Fleming didn’t just direct two movies in 1939, he directed two of what many consider to be the greatest films made – Gone With the Wind and The Wizard of Oz. Where the former, though, has more problems to contend with in today’s society, what with its depiction of slavery and race in the South during the Civil War, the latter is nothing but pure cinematic joy. Seen by more people than any other movie, The Wizard of Oz has become infused in who we are. Quotes from the movie can pop up in everyday conversation without people even realizing they’re quoting it. The songs – particularly “Over the Rainbow” – have been burned into our brains at an early age. It truly is a shining example of what cinema can be. Join us – Pete Wright and Andy Nelson – as we continue our ‘films of 1939’ series with one of the great cinema achievements, Flemings’ The Wizard of Oz. Here’s a Look Into Our ConversationWe talk about what makes this film so great and why it’s lasted so long, looking at everything from the story to the music to Judy Garland as Dorothy Gale. We discuss Fleming as the main director putting the film together, the 14 writers tasked with bringing this script to life, and L. Frank Baum, the author of the original Oz stories. We chat about the actors – Garland, Ray Bolger, Jack Haley, Bert Lahr, Frank Morgan, Margaret Hamilton, Jerry Maren, the Singer Midgets and more (not to mention Terry the dog as Toto) – and look at what they all bring to the table here. We chat about Buddy Gillespie’s special effects, Adrian’s costumes, Harold Rosson’s cinematography, Herbert Stothart’s music adaptation, Harold Arlen’s & Yip Harberg’s songs and Mervyn LeRoy’s & Arthur Freed’s producing, tying together all the elements they each were responsible for. And we comment on the popularity of the film, chat about it being a gay icon, and look at how it started at a loss but ended up making bank over the decades. It’s one of the greats and certainly one we have a lot of passion about discussing. Check it out! Film SundriesFind the Original Episode From Season Five HereiTunesAmazonScreenplayOriginal theatrical trailerOriginal poster artworkArt of the TitleThe Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank BaumFlickchartImaginary Worlds Podcast — Why They FightThe Alphabetical Wizard of OzThe Dark Side of OzThe Slippers DocumentaryBert Lahr’s Lay’s Potato Chip Commercials(& here) This show is part of the Spreaker Prime Network, if you are interested in advertising on this podcast, contact us at https://www.spreaker.com/show/5640170/advertisement

Duration:01:41:05

Stagecoach • Rebroadcast • The Next Reel

7/20/2023
"We’re the victims of a foul disease called social prejudice, my child."REBROADCASTFord Delivers A Classic WesternWhen John Ford decided to helm Stagecoach in 1939, he hadn’t done a western since his days in the silent film era. Yet it was this film, along with his relationship with John Wayne, that would lead to him making arguably some of the greatest westerns in cinema. Yet with this film, it was really more of a chance to make a western that could be a bit more serious, not just another b-level shoot-em-up, while still making a movie that was pretty light and entertaining. Join us – Pete Wright and Andy Nelson – as we continue our series on films from 1939 with Ford’s Stagecoach. Here’s a Hint at Our ConversationWe talk about John Ford as a director and what he was trying to do with this film, pointing out some Ford-isms along with debating his strength as a filmmaker. We chat about Dudley Nichols’ script adapted from Ernest Haycox’s short story, enjoying what he did with the nine principal characters in the film, even if there were some pacing issues throughout. We discuss the cinematography of Bert Glennon and the way he and Ford shot the action sequences. We chat about stuntman and stunt coordinator Yakima Canutt, marveling at the amazing stunts he performs in the film while also feeling pretty horrified at the methods he devised to get the horses to fall on camera. And we touch on the cast, touching on what each of them bring to their roles. It’s a fun film, even if not one of our favorites, but still gives us a great movie to talk about. So check it out then tune in! Film SundriesListen to the Original Episode From Season Five HereiTunesAmazonHuluScript TranscriptOriginal theatrical trailerOriginal poster artworkThe Stage to Lordsburg by Ernest HaycoxFlickchartStagecoach Location Shooting BreakdownStagecoach & the Ned Scott Still Photographs This show is part of the Spreaker Prime Network, if you are interested in advertising on this podcast, contact us at https://www.spreaker.com/show/5640170/advertisement

Duration:01:13:38

Ninotchka • Rebroadcast • The Next Reel

7/17/2023
“I should hate to see our country endangered by my underwear."REBROADCASTGreta Garbo Smiles! And It’s a Delight!Taking a completely different turn from last week’s Civil War epic, Ninotchka is a very light comedy by Ernst Lubitch dealing with Russians in their post-Revolution society. Join us — Pete Wright and Andy Nelson — as we continue our film about the great films of 1939 with Lubitch’s Ninotchka. Here’s a Hint at What We DiscussWe talk about the wonderfully funny script by Charles Brackett, Billy Wilder and Walter Reisch based on the original story by Melchior Lengyel, and look at why the comedy works so well in a film like this. We chat about Greta Garbo as the titular character and how wonderful she is, and we look at the rest of the brilliant cast – Melvyn Douglas, Ina Claire, Bela Lugosi, Sig Ruman, Felis Bressart, Alexander Granach and others – as we discuss what they bring to the table. We also touch on Garbo and her retirement from the business. And we chat about Lubitsch and his “Lubitsch Touch” and what that means in context of this film. It’s a fun film that’s very easy to watch. Check it out then tune in! Film SundriesFind the Original Episode From Season Five HereScriptOriginal theatrical trailerOriginal poster artworkFlickchartThe WETA Effect This show is part of the Spreaker Prime Network, if you are interested in advertising on this podcast, contact us at https://www.spreaker.com/show/5640170/advertisement

Duration:00:47:38

Mission: Impossible – Dead Reckoning Part One • The Next Reel • Member Bonus

7/13/2023
“The world is changing. Truth is vanishing.” Ethan Hunt and Co. Are Back For our July member bonus episode, we wrap up our conversation about Ethan Hunt and his impossible missions. For Christopher McQuarrie’s latest entry into the franchise, Ethan and his team are up against none other than a form of sentient AI they call The Entity. Join us – Pete Wright and Andy Nelson – as we close our chats in our Mission: Impossible series – at least until next year’s conclusion to this story – with McQuarrie’s 2023 film Mission: Impossible – Dead Reckoning Part One. Here’s a hint at what we talk about. It’s a great entry to the franchise, and we certainly spoil it. The characters are great, the action sequences are a thrill, the story works well. If anything, there are elements that feel clunky within some of the exposition, the camera work, the editing and the structure. Is this because McQuarrie shot two lengthy films back to back and might’ve been overwhelmed? Is it because he’s trying to create a unique look and feel for each of his films in this franchise? Is he trying to create tension with creative shots that just aren’t working? It’s hard to say, but we certainly noticed it. The story largely focuses on a form of AI that grows some form of sentience that partners up with one of Hunt’s old adversaries then works to control the world. With the zeitgeist around AI right now, it’s quite fitting. We discuss the nature of this story today – and the fact that they were originally intending it to be released two full years ago – and why it works in context of this world. It feels like a perfect next step for the franchise. We talk about elements brought in from previous films that we noticed as well, and walk through the action beats. There’s a lot to discuss. We have a great time talking about it, so check it out then tune in. The Next Reel – when the movie ends, our conversation begins! Join the conversation with movie lovers from around the world on The Next Reel’s Discord channel! Film Sundries Learn more about supporting The Next Reel Film Podcast through your own membership. Theatrical trailerPoster artworkFlickchartLetterboxdThis is a member bonus episode that we’re releasing to everyone so you can get a taste or the extra content our members get. We'd love it if you became a member to support our show, but you’d love it because of everything you get. We have monthly member bonus episodes like this that only members can access. You also get ad-free episodes, access to members-only Discord channels, and early releases for every episode. And you get to vote on the movies we discuss in our members only episodes! What can we say? It pays to be a member. Learn more about supporting The Next Reel Film Podcast through your own membership — visit TruStory FM. This show is part of the Spreaker Prime Network, if you are interested in advertising on this podcast, contact us at https://www.spreaker.com/show/5640170/advertisement

Duration:01:25:47

Mr. Smith Goes to Washington • Rebroadcast • The Next Reel

7/10/2023
“You’re not a Senator, you’re an honorary stooge."REBROADCASTCapra’s Film Stands As Strong As EverIt’s rare to find a film from 75 years ago that feels relevant still in today’s world, but Frank Capra’s 1939 Mr. Smith Goes to Washington is one of those films. Corruption in the Senate? Check. Corporate interests secretly working their own machinations behind the scenes to get their political puppets to do their bidding? Check. Cynical office staff who are only interested in making a buck? Check. Sad to say that the only thing that doesn’t feel modern is that a politician like James Stewart’s titular character could actually exist. Or at least survive in today’s political world. Join us — Pete Wright and Andy Nelson — as we continue with our great films from 1939 series with Capra’s fantastic film Mr. Smith Goes to Washington. Here’s What We Chat AboutWe talk about how much we love this film and why, highlighting everything aforementioned. We chat about Stewart and Jean Arthur as the perfect leads for this film, aided by the wonderful supporting cast including Edward Arnold, Harry Carey, Claude Rains, Thomas Mitchell and more. We discuss how the Washington, D.C. press and the real Senators received the film compared with the general public. And we discuss the people behind the cameras with Capra and what they bring to the table – Joseph Walker, Lionel Banks, Dimitri Tiomkin, Sidney Buchman, Lewis R. Foster and more. It’s a top notch film that still speaks to its audiences, all while avoiding being cheesy while full of honesty. We love it. Make sure you watch this one and then tune in! Film SundriesFind the Original Episode From Season Five HereScript TranscriptOriginal theatrical trailerOriginal poster artworkFlickchart This show is part of the Spreaker Prime Network, if you are interested in advertising on this podcast, contact us at https://www.spreaker.com/show/5640170/advertisement

Duration:00:59:57

Goodbye, Mr. Chips • Rebroadcast • The Next Reel

7/6/2023
"Give a boy a sense of humor and a sense of proportion and he’ll stand up to anything."REBROADCASTLearning Lessons That Last a Lifetime With Mr. ChipsRobert Donat defied the odds and beat both Clark Gable and Jimmy Stewart for the Best Actor Oscar in the 1940 Academy Awards with his portrayal of Mr. Chips in Sam Wood’s Goodbye, Mr. Chips. It’s a movie that celebrates school heroes everyone had (or should’ve) and connects in its ability to reflect back on the nostalgia of one’s life. Join us – Pete Wright and Andy Nelson – as we continue our series on films from 1939 with Wood’s film. Here’s What We Chat AboutWe talk about how we felt about the film and, despite any issues we had, still found it affecting. We chat about Robert Donat and Greer Garson, both of whom really give touching and honest performances. We touch on Wood as the director and what he brings to the table. We discuss the story and why stories about teachers can work so well, and why they work on us in particular. And we look at the magnificent work Jack Dawn did with the hair and makeup to bring Mr. Chips to life over the course of his 60+ years, from new hire to headmaster. It’s a touching film that works to connect us with this character and reminds us what we love about the best ‘great teacher’ movies. Check it out! Film SundriesFind the Original Episode HereiTunesAmazonScript TranscriptOriginal theatrical trailerOriginal poster artworkGoodbye, Mr. Chips by James HiltonFlickchartTo You, Mr. Chips, the follow-up book by James Hilton This show is part of the Spreaker Prime Network, if you are interested in advertising on this podcast, contact us at https://www.spreaker.com/show/5640170/advertisement

Duration:01:03:04

Gone With the Wind • Rebroadcast • The Next Reel

7/3/2023
See the list for our entire lineup for SEASON 13 on our Letterboxd page! “Frankly, my dear, I don’t give a damn." REBROADCASTFinding Rhett and Scarlet Less RelevantConsidering the racially-charged climate of the US right now, it’s oddly perfect timing that we’re starting our 1939 series with Gone With The Wind, a film as technically brilliant to look at as it is hard to watch because of it’s portrayal of slavery and the ‘lost cause’ Southern view of the Civil War. It certainly gives us a lot to talk about in this episode! Join us — Pete Wright and Andy Nelson — as we dive into Victor Fleming’s Gone With The Wind. Here’s What We Chat AboutWe talk at length about the position of the film in cinematic history and how that contrasts with what it’s portraying and how we feel about that, noting that perhaps this film is one that should be considered in the same camp as Song of the South. And we look at what problems we have with the story and why it makes us feel uncomfortable, even if the story itself can be enjoyed when taken out of historical context. Focusing more on the film itself, we look at the actors – Vivien Leigh, Clark Gable, Olivia de Havilland, Leslie Howard, Thomas Mitchell, Hattie McDaniel and more – how they got their parts and how well they work for us. We look at lots of bit players and talk about where they’ve since popped up. We talk about the context of 1939 and how the studio system worked. We talk about the three directors who contributed to this film – George Cukor, Victor Fleming and Sam Wood – as well as the producing kingpin who really is the one responsible for getting this film made the way he wanted: David O. Selznick. We chat about other key crew who helped bring this film to life, including Max Steiner, Yakima Canutt, William Cameron Menzies and Walter Plunkett. And we marvel at how much money this film has taken in over its lifetime and deliberate over whether it should still be able to make money or if it should be locked away now due to its painful portrayal of the period. It’s a long film but a film well worth discussing because of these factors. Tune in!Film SundriesOriginal Release of This Episode in Season 5ScreenplayOriginal theatrical trailerOriginal poster artworkGone With The Wind by Margaret MitchellFlickchartHuffPost Politics Blog: Yes, You’re a Racist — and a Traitor This show is part of the Spreaker Prime Network, if you are interested in advertising on this podcast, contact us at https://www.spreaker.com/show/5640170/advertisement

Duration:01:21:11

Mission: Impossible – Fallout • The Next Reel

6/29/2023
See the list for our entire lineup for SEASON 13 on our Letterboxd page! “The IMF is like Halloween, a bunch of grown men in rubber masks playing trick-or-treat.”Hunt Is Back, and He’s Better Than Ever... ReallyIt’s crazy that we’re at the sixth film in the franchise and it’s the best of the bunch. How does that happen? Likely, it’s because Cruise has been driving this franchise not just as star but also producer from the start, but it’s hard to dismiss the fact that writer/director Christopher McQuarrie returned. His sense of this story, these characters, and this world seems to fit hand to glove as much as Cruise does. Join us – Pete Wright and Andy Nelson – as we continue our Mission: Impossible series with McQuarrie’s 2018 film Mission: Impossible – Fallout. Here’s a hint at what we talk about.It’s like they take all the greatest moments from the previous five films and find ways to integrate reworked versions of them into this film. It’s fantastic. We walk through the various action beats in this film, starting with the over two-and-a-half minute single shot of Hunt and Walker doing a HALO jump into Paris. And it only gets better from there. Hunt is dealing with Solomon Lane again, but we’re also adding John Lark into the mix. It’s a bit of a mystery as to who he is, but... not really. It’s hard to buy Lark, aka August Walker, as anything but villainous. Is it the way Henry Cavill plays him? Or is he just written that way? Regardless, he makes for a great villain and works exceptionally well in this franchise. There’s also the return to Julia as a key part in Hunt’s life. It plays well, and clearly is an important point to Hunt learning to navigate his life when it comes to saving the world vs. saving those he loves. That plays not only into Julia’s story but also Ilsa, as clearly something is developing here with her in her return. All in all, it’s a great film that shows insane stunt work by Cruise, a broken ankle, great characters, a thrilling and engaging story, and a mystery as to where it could go from here. We love it. We have a great time talking about it, so check it out then tune in. The Next Reel – when the movie ends, our conversation begins! Join the conversation with movie lovers from around the world on The Next Reel’s Discord channel! Film SundriesLearn more about supporting The Next Reel Film Podcast through your own membership.AppleAmazonJustWatchScript OptionsTheatrical trailerPoster artworkFlickchartLetterboxd This show is part of the Spreaker Prime Network, if you are interested in advertising on this podcast, contact us at https://www.spreaker.com/show/5640170/advertisement

Duration:01:22:08

Mission: Impossible – Rogue Nation • The Next Reel

6/22/2023
See the list for our entire lineup for SEASON 13 on our Letterboxd page! “We’re kind of formulating a plan B, although technically it’s a plan C.”Everyone’s Gone Rogue in Rogue NationChristopher McQuarrie did some uncredited rewrites on Mission: Impossible – Ghost Protocol, though he’d worked with Tom Cruise a number of times in the past, having written and directed Jack Reacher then writing Edge of Tomorrow. Clearly, his strength as a storyteller, perhaps more than his friendship with Cruise, led Cruise to offer him the opportunity to help the fifth Mission: Impossible film. That opportunity to not only work on the script but also direct seemed to be the right formula Cruise (perhaps more the producer than the star) was looking for to bring the franchise into right zone he’d been looking for from the start. Join us – Pete Wright and Andy Nelson – as we continue our journey through our Mission: Impossible series with a conversation about McQuarrie’s 2015 film Mission: Impossible – Rogue Nation. Here’s a hint at what we talk about.Right out of the gate, we’re given an exciting action sequence, one which had been advertised relentlessly to draw audiences to the film to see Cruise hanging off the side of a plane. For real. It’s insane but makes for a great start to the movie. Plus, we get more comedy with the team and intrigue as the IMF gets shut down by the Senate, which puts Ethan on the run. It’s a thrill of a way to start the movie that shows we’re on the right track now. The team is great, keeping Jeremy Renner, Simon Pegg, and the ever-consistent Ving Rhames from the last film. It’s our first full repeat, and it works well. We do have questions about the roles of each of the team members though. Are they given enough delineation between them? Is this, perhaps, why Jeremy Renner doesn’t return? The big surprise is the addition of Rebecca Ferguson who proves herself Cruise’s equal and brings tremendous chemistry as a British spy working both with and against Hunt at seemingly every turn. She’s incredibly compelling and is stunning in that dress. Of course the villain has to work for the team to be of any interest, and we’re fans of what Sean Harris is bringing as ex-MI6 operative Solomon Lane, the head of The Syndicate. He’s compelling, and the plot moves in exciting directions dictated by him. It’s a thrill of a film in a franchise that only gets better. We have a great time talking about it, so check it out then tune in. The Next Reel – when the movie ends, our conversation begins! Join the conversation with movie lovers from around the world on The Next Reel’s Discord channel! Film SundriesLearn more about supporting The Next Reel Film Podcast through your own membership.AppleAmazonJustWatchTheatrical trailerPoster artworkFlickchartLetterboxd This show is part of the Spreaker Prime Network, if you are interested in advertising on this podcast, contact us at https://www.spreaker.com/show/5640170/advertisement

Duration:01:12:26

Mission: Impossible – Ghost Protocol • The Next Reel

6/15/2023
See the list for our entire lineup for SEASON 13 on our Letterboxd page! “You actually said that out loud? ‘Mission accomplished?’”Ethan Hunt Shifts Gears and Finds His GrooveBrad Bird’s on board the franchise, getting a chance to not only make his first live action film but also to do so in a major franchise with giant set pieces and mega-stars. Perhaps that’s what the franchise needed, after all of Cruise’s antics around the time the third film was released. There was even talk that this film might have been his last as the franchise lead, turning it over to Jeremy Renner from this point forward. But things worked out, perhaps because of Bird’s injection of fun and levity he brought, and the franchise shited to something that would only continue improving. Join us – Pete Wright and Andy Nelson – as we continue our M:I series with a conversation about Bird’s 2011 film Mission: Impossible – Ghost Protocol. Here’s a hint at what we talk about.This film is a blast from start to finish. We have a great team that feels cohesive both as a team in context of the film working to solve their mission as well as the actors who actually have chemistry and blend well. There’s a lot of play with the spy tech here as we get some incredible gadgets, but we also get to see what happens when our spies have to think outside the box when gadgets break or malfunction. The set pieces in this film all bring new and different energy to the franchise and the film, particularly the centerpiece of the film – Cruise scaling the side of the Burj Khalifa in Dubai. It’s insane and we’re here for all of it. We also have a villain that feels wonderfully villainous. Could we have used more of Michael Niqvist? Sure. But what we get works well for us. Even his threat to launch a nuke and start WWIII, while at the level of Bond villains, has a bit of a grounded feel to it. We talk a bit about the end of Cruise/Wagner Productions, and also ponder why Bird hasn’t had a chance to make many more live action features. Regardless, it’s a great conversation about a film that certainly set a new high bar for this franchise. We have a great time talking about it, so check it out then tune in. The Next Reel – when the movie ends, our conversation begins! Join the conversation with movie lovers from around the world on The Next Reel’s Discord channel! Film Sundriesyour own membershipAppleAmazonJustWatchScript OptionsTheatrical trailerPoster artworkFlickchartLetterboxd This show is part of the Spreaker Prime Network, if you are interested in advertising on this podcast, contact us at https://www.spreaker.com/show/5640170/advertisement

Duration:01:11:24

Working Girl • A Conversation with Writer/Producer Rachel Lewis • Movies We Like

6/12/2023
“You don’t get anywhere in this world by waiting for what you want to come to you. You make it happen.”Talking About Working Girl with our guest, writer/producer Rachel LewisMike Nichols’ film has been in all of our lives for decades now, and there are reasons it stands out as a classic. It’s a Cinderella story dealing with the sexism in the 80s workplace, and how one woman proves she has the stuff to break out of the secretary role in which she’d been stuck. It’s full of laughs, but also full of heart. And lest we forget the magnificent big 80s hair. It’s a sight to behold. Sure, the movie has some dated elements that don’t work quite as well, but that’s looking through today’s eyes. For its place in the late 80s, it works perfectly and delivers a solid film. Writer/producer Rachel Lewis is a big fan, and we have a great conversation with her about the movie. We chat through the cast and the themes. And then there’s Carly Simon’s fantastic and anthemic song that’s as inspiring as the movie is itself. Rachel tells us about her career and how she got started in the world of improv comedy before moving to LA and working her way into pitch meetings. As a writer, WGA team captain, and lot coordinator for the current strike, she also breaks down some of the reasons for it and what the writers are collectively working toward. It’s a fantastic conversation about a great movie and the importance of this current strike. Check it out! Film SundriesLearn more about how you can support the WGA during their strikeyour own membershipThe Next Reel’s Discord channelon the webInstagramTwitterIMDbAppleAmazonJustWatchScript OptionsTheatrical trailer“Let the River Run” by Carly Simon music videoPoster artworkFlickchartLetterboxd This show is part of the Spreaker Prime Network, if you are interested in advertising on this podcast, contact us at https://www.spreaker.com/show/5640170/advertisement

Duration:00:55:08

Mission: Impossible III • The Next Reel

6/8/2023
“Humpty Dumpty sat on a wall.”Ethan’s back, and he’s getting married!It took some time to sort out the plans for this one’s script, and it wasn’t easy finding the director either. Tom Cruise and Paula Wagner did get there though, locking in TV showrunner JJ Abrams to co-write and helm the third in this franchise, making it his feature film debut. Join us – Pete Wright and Andy Nelson – as we continue our ‘Mission: Impossible’ series with a look at Abrams’ 2006 film Mission: Impossible III. Here’s a hint at what we talk about.The film starts with a gut punch, introducing us to the villain and setting up Ethan and his wife in a position as hostages. Philip Seymour Hoffman as Owen Davian, the villain, is perfect and the star of this film, but is it too early to start having issues? As someone much more in tune with co-writer/director JJ Abrams at the time, Pete was very much in the bag for being there with Abrams as he made the leap to the big screen. Andy didn’t have that connection so didn’t have as much of an interest in the film (or the franchise at this point after John Woo’s second entry). So does the opening work? We talk about the vibe of the film and how, because of the romance between Ethan and Julia, it feels very different. Largely, it works and moves us past Woo’s mess of a film into something that feels better already. It’s just unfortunate that there are still so many issues. Perhaps the largest is that it never quite feels cinematic. Regardless, it’s a fun entry into the franchise and gives us plenty to dig into. We have a great time talking about it, so check it out then tune in. The Next Reel – when the movie ends, our conversation begins!Film SundriesThe Next Reel’s Discord channelyour own membershipAppleAmazonJustWatchScript OptionsTheatrical trailerPoster artworkFlickchartLetterboxd This show is part of the Spreaker Prime Network, if you are interested in advertising on this podcast, contact us at https://www.spreaker.com/show/5640170/advertisement

Duration:01:23:24