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PBS News Hour - Supreme Court

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The latest news and analysis about key cases and critical arguments before the Supreme Court. (Updated periodically) PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

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Washington, DC

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PBS

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The latest news and analysis about key cases and critical arguments before the Supreme Court. (Updated periodically) PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Twitter:

@NewsHour

Language:

English

Contact:

MacNeil/Lehrer Productions 2700 South Quincy Street Arlington, VA 22206 703-998-2138


Episodes
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Conservative Supreme Court majority strikes down ban on bump stocks

6/14/2024
The Supreme Court handed down a ruling with major implications for firearm regulations. In a 6-3 decision, the conservative majority found that the government exceeded its authority when it banned bump stocks. The gun accessory allows users to re-engage the trigger continuously, dramatically increasing the rate of fire. Amna Nawaz discussed more with News Hour Supreme Court analyst Marcia Coyle. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Duration:00:06:00

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Access to mifepristone remains unchanged as Supreme Court rejects abortion pill challenge

6/13/2024
In a unanimous decision, the Supreme Court ruled that a group of anti-abortion doctors does not have any legal basis to challenge access to mifepristone, one of the two common drugs used in medication abortion. As a result, access to mifepristone will not change. John Yang reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Duration:00:03:00

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Former neighbor disputes Alito's explanation of upside-down U.S. flag flying at his home

6/6/2024
A former neighbor of Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito said, "at worst, he's just outright lying," about his account of a neighborhood dispute that led to hoisting an upside-down American flag at his Virginia home. The inverted flag is associated with the effort to overturn President Biden's 2020 election win. Lisa Desjardins reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Duration:00:05:08

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Alito says he won't recuse himself from election and Jan. 6 cases after flag controversies

5/29/2024
Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito told lawmakers he won't recuse himself from cases involving the 2020 presidential election or the Jan. 6 Capitol riot despite concerns about two flags associated with far-right causes that have flown over his properties. Alito said his wife, Martha-Ann Alito, was responsible for flying the flags. Geoff Bennett discussed more with Kathleen Clark. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Duration:00:07:34

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Supreme Court rejects racial gerrymandering claim in South Carolina

5/23/2024
The Supreme Court struck down a challenge to a congressional map in South Carolina that civil rights groups argued was a racial gerrymander. In a 6-3 decision, the conservative majority delivered a win to Republicans who said they used politics, not race, as the key factor when drawing the district bounds. Geoff Bennett discussed the decision with NewsHour Supreme Court analyst Marcia Coyle. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Duration:00:05:28

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Flag associated with Christian nationalism flown at Alito's beach house, report says

5/23/2024
The New York Times reports that an "Appeal to Heaven" flag, which has origins dating to the Revolutionary War but is now associated with Christian nationalism and efforts to overturn President Biden's election win, was seen flying outside Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito's New Jersey beach home last year. White House Correspondent Laura Barrón-López reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Duration:00:06:45

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How the reversal of Roe v. Wade reshaped American life

5/19/2024
It's been nearly two years since the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade and eliminated the federal right to abortion. Shefali Luthra, a health reporter at The 19th News, spoke to a variety of Americans about how their lives have been upended by the court's decision for her book, "Undue Burden: Life and Death Decisions in Post-Roe America." She joined Laura Barrón-López to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Duration:00:06:41

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Analyzing the consequential Supreme Court term and its ideological divide

5/2/2024
The Supreme Court wrapped up oral arguments and has now turned to rolling out decisions in some of the most consequential cases of the year. Those decisions will shape policies nationwide on divisive issues like homelessness and reproductive rights, and some of them could affect the presidential election. John Yang discussed more with NewsHour Supreme Court analyst Marcia Coyle and Joan Biskupic. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Duration:00:07:58

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Analyzing the Supreme Court hearing on Trump's presidential immunity claim

4/25/2024
The Supreme Court heard debate over one of its most consequential cases, whether a former president is immune from prosecution for actions taken while in office. Arguments were heard on an appeal brought by Donald Trump, who's being prosecuted for attempting to overthrow the results of the 2020 election. John Yang discussed more with William Brangham and Supreme Court analyst Marcia Coyle. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Duration:00:09:25

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Supreme Court weighs whether federal law allowing emergency abortions overrides state bans

4/24/2024
It was a charged atmosphere at the Supreme Court as justices heard arguments in a major abortion case. The court looked at whether a federal law requiring hospitals to provide abortion care in emergencies would apply to states with strict bans. More than two dozen states ban or severely restrict abortion and six states have no health exceptions. Geoff Bennett discussed the case with Sarah Varney. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Duration:00:06:31

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National Labor Relations Board's authority faces challenge in Starbucks Supreme Court case

4/23/2024
The U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments Tuesday in a key case that could have major implications for labor rights. The court looked at a challenge brought by Starbucks against a lower court decision to reinstate seven baristas in Memphis who were fired by the company after they announced plans to unionize. Geoff Bennett discussed more with Washington Post labor reporter Lauren Gurley. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Duration:00:04:38

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Supreme Court hears case on whether cities can criminalize homelessness, disband camps

4/22/2024
The U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments in the most significant case on homelessness in decades. The case looks at challenges to laws in a small Oregon town fining homeless people up to $300 for setting up camps in public parks. The heart of the question is whether these laws classify as cruel and unusual punishment. Geoff Bennett and NewsHour Supreme Court analyst Marcia Coyle discussed the case. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Duration:00:07:34

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What's at stake in the upcoming Supreme Court case on laws limiting homelessness

4/21/2024
The Supreme Court is set to hear arguments Monday on whether laws limiting homelessness are unconstitutional because they punish people for being unhoused. The case is about laws in a small city in Oregon, but the outcome could reshape policies nationwide for years to come. John Yang speaks with Charley Willison, who teaches public health at Cornell University, to learn more. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Duration:00:06:19

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Supreme Court questions use of obstruction law in Jan. 6 cases

4/16/2024
The Supreme Court heard arguments on Tuesday in a case looking at an obstruction law used to prosecute hundreds of Jan. 6 rioters. The obstruction statute is also key to various legal challenges facing former President Donald Trump. Geoff Bennett discussed more with Politico's Kyle Cheney, who has been following the Jan. 6 legal fallout. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Duration:00:04:16

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Reproductive rights before Supreme Court again with abortion pill access at stake

3/26/2024
The Supreme Court heard arguments in a major case that could further limit when and how women in America can get an abortion. The case centers on access to the most widely used abortion pill mifepristone. It's the latest in the ongoing legal battle over reproductive rights. William Brangham discussed the arguments with NewsHour Supreme Court analyst Marcia Coyle. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Duration:00:06:44

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Future of abortion pill mifepristone will be decided by Supreme Court

3/25/2024
The U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments Tuesday over whether to restrict access to mifepristone, one of two drugs used in medication abortions. The case will be the first the court has heard on abortion since it overturned Roe v. Wade. Special Correspondent Sarah Varney reports on what's at stake. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Duration:00:07:49

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Stephen Breyer on new book 'Reading the Constitution' and debate over how to interpret it

3/25/2024
For as long as America has had a constitution, there's been debate over how to interpret it. That's particularly true when it comes to hot-button Supreme Court cases. For nearly 30 years, Stephen Breyer served on the nation's highest court, deciding on cases with ramifications still being felt across the country today. Amna Nawaz spoke with Breyer about his new book, "Reading the Constitution." PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Duration:00:10:31

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Why 2024 may be the most consequential election for reproductive rights in 50 years

3/24/2024
The Supreme Court will hear arguments on Tuesday in a case challenging FDA rules that make it easier to get mifepristone, the medication that accounts for more than half of all U.S. abortions. John Yang speaks with legal historian Mary Ziegler about the role executive branch agencies can play in a post-Roe world and the potential consequences of the 2024 election for reproductive rights. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Duration:00:06:35

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Controversial Texas immigration law back on hold as appeals court hears arguments

3/20/2024
After a series of legal back and forths, an immigration law in Texas is back in the hands of an appeals court. The law gives state officials the power to arrest migrants who they believe crossed into the U.S. illegally. A Supreme Court ruling allowed Texas to enforce the law, but a federal appeals court put it back on hold. Amna Nawaz discussed the latest with Gaige Davila of Texas Public Radio. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Duration:00:05:23

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Supreme Court clears way for Texas police to arrest and deport migrants

3/19/2024
The U.S. Supreme Court cleared the way for Texas to enforce a controversial immigration law that allows state officials to arrest and deport migrants who cross the border illegally. Challenges to the law are not over as the justices sent the case back to a lower court. Geoff Bennett discussed the ruling with NewsHour Supreme Court analyst Marcia Coyle. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Duration:00:02:38