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The news you need to know today — and the stories that will stick with you tomorrow. Plus, special series and behind-the-scenes extras from Here & Now hosts Robin Young, Scott Tong and Deepa Fernandes with help from Producer Chris Bentley and the team at NPR and WBUR.

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The news you need to know today — and the stories that will stick with you tomorrow. Plus, special series and behind-the-scenes extras from Here & Now hosts Robin Young, Scott Tong and Deepa Fernandes with help from Producer Chris Bentley and the team at NPR and WBUR.

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Episodes
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The impact of AI

5/24/2024
The International Court of Justice ordered Israel to stop its attacks in Rafah. Professor John Quigley joins us. Then, ABC's Rick Klein and NPR's Ron Elving discuss the week in politics, including concerns about Justice Samuel Alito's homes as the Supreme Court rules on whether former President Donald Trump has immunity from prosecution. And, we hear from longtime tech journalist Kara Swisher about the latest news on artificial intelligence, including the spate of recent developments with generative AI. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy

Duration:00:31:32

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Trauma specialist offers tips for recovery

5/23/2024
The Supreme Court upheld a map drawn by South Carolina legislature that challengers said was a racial gerrymander. Law professor Spencer Overton joins us. And, though it's often difficult to prosecute those who harass or threaten election officials, a few people have been sentenced for targeting the same election official in Arizona. Maricopa County Recorder Stephen Richer joins us. Then, trauma specialist Karesten Koenen joins us to offer tips on how people who have experienced trauma and violence can overcome it. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy

Duration:00:29:01

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Elmo wants to know how you're feeling this Mental Health Awareness Month

5/22/2024
A new Florida law will delete most references to climate change from state policy come July. Grist's Jake Bittle tells us more. Cancer 'super tests' screen for more than 50 cancers with a single finger prick. But are they saving lives? Dr. Benjamin Mazer talks about the Galleri test. Then, for Mental Health Awareness Month, Sesame Workshop released new emotional well-being resources for parents and kids. Elmo and Sesame Workshop's Kama Einhorn join us. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy

Duration:00:25:46

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How drought put the Panama Canal in troubled water

5/21/2024
A lack of rain in the Panama Canal has snarled cargo ships traveling through the crucial global shipping route and set off water concerns in Panama. Here & Now's Scott Tong reports. And, AIPAC, the American Israel Public Affairs Committee, is the most prominent pro-Israel lobbying group in U.S. politics. Politico's Nicholas Wu explains where the group is spending its money this election season. Then, anthropologist Jason De León spent seven years embedded with a group of smugglers moving migrants across Mexico. He joins us to talk about his new book "Soldiers and Kings," which tells their stories. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy

Duration:00:32:56

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What we can learn from 'American Divas'

5/20/2024
The International Criminal Court's prosecutor is seeking arrest warrants for Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Hamas leader Yahya Sinwar, among others. The Washington Post's Louisa Loveluck joins us. As 17 American doctors evacuated Gaza late last week, three stayed behind. We talk with one of them, Dr. Jomana Al-Hinti, about her decision to stay.And, a new HPV test where patients can self-collect samples is designed to make screenings for cervical cancer more accessible and prevent it early. OB/GYN Dr. Jessica Shepherd joins us.Then, in her new book "American Diva: Extraordinary, Unruly, Fabulous," author Deborah Paredez tells stories of great divas, including Tina Turner and Venus and Serena Williams. Paredez joins us. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy

Duration:00:30:40

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How one school has changed, 70 years since Brown v. Board of Education

5/18/2024
Tuesday marked 76 years since Israel's creation. Aaron David Miller, of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, explores Israel's history and how the the day was observed amid the ongoing war in Gaza. At the same time, Palestinians across the world commemorated Al Nakba, which directly translates to "The Catastrophe." Brown University's Beshara Doumani joins us. And, West Charlotte High School was seen as a model for how schools could integrate in the 1970s. But in the 1990s, a federal judge ruled that bussing was no longer needed. Ella Dennis, historian for the school's Alumni Association, Rev. Joe B. Martin, and student government president Malachi Thompson join us. Then, 20 years ago, David Wilson and Rob Compton were one of the first same-sex couples to be married in the U.S. They join us to reflect on the anniversary. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy

Duration:00:35:25

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Birds are migrating north. Here's how you can help them

5/16/2024
The Supreme Court ruled that a map that draws a second majority-Black congressional district in Louisiana can be used in this year's elections. Law professor Spencer Overton explains its impact. And, patients in Gaza with conditions such as epilepsy, Parkinson's and cerebral palsy are uniquely challenged by the ongoing violence. Dr. Jomana Al-Hinti talks about the need for neurologists in Gaza. Then, the Department of Health and Human Services has barred disability discrimination in health care. Disability Scoop's Michelle Diament breaks down the new rule and how it relates to the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. Finally, this week is peak time for bird migration in the northern part of the U.S. But lights and windows can make their journey tougher. Scientist Andrew Farnsworth explains how people can help. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy

Duration:00:27:47

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How AI is changing the music industry

5/15/2024
Republicans in Nevada are suing the state over election rules. Journalist Jon Ralston tells us more. Then, the Biden administration is moving forward with a $1 billion arms transfer to Israel after holding up a shipment of 2,000-pound bombs last week. The Washington Post's John Hudson joins us. Plus, AI is changing the music industry. Berklee College of Music professor Ben Camp explains how. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy

Duration:00:26:42

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The WNBA's big moment

5/14/2024
The Biden administration is boosting tariffs on Chinese-made electric vehicles to 100%. InsideEV's Kevin Williams joins us. Then, American doctors are stuck in Gaza after the Rafah border closed ahead of an impending invasion from Israel. Dr. Majdi Hamarshi of the Palestinian American Medical Association talks about efforts to bring them home. And, the WNBA's regular season tips off Tuesday night. Connecticut Sun President Jen Rizzotti talks about the recent success of the league and how her team is preparing to face all-star Caitlin Clark. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy

Duration:00:21:18

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'Never Enough': How toxic achievement culture does damage

5/13/2024
With the Rafah border closed as the region faces an impending invasion from Israeli forces, hospitals in Gaza are struggling to function with the limited supplies they have left. We hear from Dr. Mahmoud Sabha in Gaza and John Ramming Chappell, a fellow at the Center for Civilians in Conflict, who talks about a new State Department report on Israel's conduct in the war. Then, Florida is on the verge of banning balloon releases. We talk with Jon Paul "J.P." Brooker of the Ocean Conservancy about how the ban could reduce plastic pollution. And, author Jennifer Wallace explores the dangers of what she calls "toxic achievement culture" in her new book, "Never Enough." She joins us. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy

Duration:00:31:23

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Early childhood: Preschool inequality, child care wages and emotional health

5/11/2024
The inequality gap is getting worse between the children who have access to preschool and those who don't, a new study finds. Researcher Allison Friedman-Krauss talks about the report. Then, many early educators struggle to get by on low wages. Here & Now's Ashley Locke reports on a new program that aims to help. And, psychotherapist Martha Heineman Pieper explains why she advocates for preschools to take a different approach to supporting young children's Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy

Duration:00:26:15

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How Steve Albini changed music

5/9/2024
Bird flu has recently sickened dairy cows in several states. Epidemiologist Jennifer Nuzzo says more widespread testing is needed to ensure that H5N1 does not spread more easily among humans. And, remembering legendary rock music producer Steve Albini. NPR's Neda Ulaby reflects on Albini's legacy. Then, Diana Winston, director of mindfulness at UCLA Mindful, joins us to discuss meditation and how it can help ease stress and anxiety. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy

Duration:00:32:28

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How a 'Klansman's Son' became anti-racist

5/8/2024
The Israeli military entered Rafah on Tuesday, and the U.S. paused weapons shipments to Israel citing concern over the invasion. The Global Empowerment Mission's Emily Fullmer and the Washington Post's John Hudson join us. And, Palestinian American comedian Atheer Yacoub uses humor to tell the story of her life as a Muslim woman, but she doesn't delve into the ongoing war in Gaza. Then, as the child of a former Ku Klux Klan grand wizard, J. Derek Black grew up promoting white nationalism but now works as an anti-racist. They discuss their new memoir "The Klansman's Son: My Journey from White Nationalism to Anti-Racism." Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy

Duration:00:36:04

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Is there such a thing as biological age?

5/7/2024
Adult film actress Stormy Daniels testified on Tuesday at former President Trump's hush money trial. NPR's Ximena Bustillo shares the latest. Then, Alzheimer's researcher Yudong Huang talks about newly published research that indicates that one in six cases of Alzheimer's may be inherited through the gene APOE4. And, the wellness industry is booming with products that purport to measure one's biological age. But scientists can't even agree on what it is. STAT's Angus Chen tells us more. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy

Duration:00:21:31

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Indigenous climate activists honored for defeating offshore drilling effort

5/6/2024
Israel's government raided Al Jazeera's office in Jerusalem this weekend and shut down the outlet's broadcasting within the country. Al Jazeera's Mohamed Moawad joins us. And, National Guardsmen fatally shot Jeffrey Miller at Kent State during an anti-Vietnam War protest in 1970. Russ Miller joins us to remember his brother and the violence at Kent State. Then, Sinegugu Zukulu and Nonhle Mbuthuma are two of this year's Goldman Prize winners. They're from South Africa's indigenous Wild Coast community and banded together to defeat an offshore drilling effort. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy

Duration:00:27:10

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A musical journey to Havana Jazz Festival, Nonesuch catalogs and a new game

5/4/2024
The record label Nonesuch turns 60 this year. The label's president David Bither showcases artists including Rhiannon Giddens and Hurray for the Riff Raff. And, the 39th annual Havana Jazz Festival took place this year, and NPR's Alt.Latino hosts Felix Contreras and Anamaria Sayre report Cuba's musical culture is thriving. Then, "Tales of Kenzera: ZAU" is based on the culture of Africa's Bantu people explores the many emotions of grief. Composer Nainita Desai brings indigenous mythology to life with a globe-spanning musical ensemble. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy

Duration:00:34:42

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How Reno, Nevada, is tackling homelessness

5/2/2024
Northwestern University President Michael Schill talks about how the university and pro-Palestinian protestors reached a deal this week. And we hear from Brenda Maldonado, a registered nurse who was volunteering in Gaza. Then, Reno Mayor Hillary Schieve talks about how her city is addressing homelessness. And, music journalist Betto Arcos takes us along on his first-ever trip to the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy

Duration:00:32:40

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Police break up college anti-war protests

5/1/2024
Police descended on pro-Palestinian protests at the University of California Los Angeles, Columbia University and City College of New York. At Brown University, protestors reached a deal with the college. Reporters Steve Futterman, Owen Dahlkamp and Gwynne Hogan join us. And, satire publication The Onion is under new leadership with former disinformation reporter Ben Collins stepping into the role of CEO. Then, former Cigna insurance group employees are blowing the whistle on the company, saying it cares more about being fast than right, and is quick to deny claims. ProPublica's David Armstrong joins us. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy

Duration:00:33:02

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More Chinese asylum seekers are crossing the U.S. southern border

4/30/2024
What are college presidents getting right and wrong as campus protests over Israel's war in Gaza grow? Former Brandeis University president Frederick Lawrence explains. Then, the number of Chinese migrants crossing into the United States at the southern border has been growing. Documented reporter April Xu joins us. And, Here & Now's James Perkins Mastromarino looks back on April's most exciting video game releases. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy

Duration:00:29:54

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Anti-war protesters from California to Israel

4/29/2024
Over the weekend, hundreds of students were arrested in campus protests over Gaza. In Isreal, police arrested author and essayist Ayelet Waldman. Waldman, Cal Poly Humboldt dean Jeff Crane and senior Zachary Meyer join us. And, states are protecting officials ahead of the 2024 election with legislation. Public Citizen's Jonah Minkoff-Zern joins us. Then, in her new memoir, Doris Kearns Goodwin shares her late husband's contributions to history. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Privacy Policy

Duration:00:33:28