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What On Earth

CBC Podcasts & Radio On-Demand

The climate is changing. So are we. Explore a world of solutions with host Laura Lynch and our team of journalists. We find inspiration in unexpected places, scrutinize new technologies, hold powerful people accountable and join you on the journey to fix this mess. New episodes every Wednesday and Saturday.

Location:

Canada, ON

Description:

The climate is changing. So are we. Explore a world of solutions with host Laura Lynch and our team of journalists. We find inspiration in unexpected places, scrutinize new technologies, hold powerful people accountable and join you on the journey to fix this mess. New episodes every Wednesday and Saturday.

Language:

English


Episodes
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The kids want a say

5/25/2024
Could letting young people vote be a climate game changer? We hear from Vancouver teens on whether or not they think they’re ready to vote and whether climate would shape their choice at the ballot box. Then, a Canadian senator and a 17-year-old student share why they’re fighting for a proposed bill making its way through parliament.

Duration:00:26:40

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Should tourists cough up for climate? ‘Hell yeah!’

5/22/2024
In Alaska and Barcelona, money from visitors is paying for heat pumps. What do we owe to the places we go on vacation? We hear how travellers can contribute to climate solutions. And, we answer a listener’s question about whether our beloved maple syrup will disappear in a warming world.

Duration:00:26:20

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Want to stay safe during a wildfire? Know your neighbours.

5/18/2024
As wildfires rage across the country, we hear how to harness the power of community in the face of danger. And, we share listeners’ response to our interview with two long-time wildland firefighters in Alberta about what they say is a crisis in the ranks.

Duration:00:26:39

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Can the law of the sea save island states from rising water?

5/15/2024
Soon, a little-known international tribunal will release a precedent setting decision that could force developed nations to do more to protect small island states from the ravages of climate change. A Canadian lawyer represented those tiny countries at the International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea. He shares what’s at stake, along with another member of the legal team - Naima Te Maile Fefita of Tuvalu. Then our listeners get into a lather about the dishes. Hand wash or dishwasher?

Duration:00:27:10

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Low pay, high risk. Why stay to fight wildfires in Alberta?

5/11/2024
Wildfire fighters say working conditions threaten the safety of crew and the public in that province. As climate change leads to more intense forest fires, the people on the front lines say they’re losing team members to other employers and something needs to change.

Duration:00:27:13

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Why a goose hunt can make all the difference to evacuees

5/8/2024
An Indigenous-owned company in Ontario is making sure evacuations are culturally appropriate, including supporting people to seek refuge on their traplines instead of hotels. Then we ask Canada’s Indigenous Services Minister how Ottawa can make climate emergencies less traumatic for Indigenous communities, and why members of the Peguis First Nation remain displaced two years after a major flood.

Duration:00:27:54

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A giant battery hides deep under this Toronto shopping mall

5/4/2024
Come underground to glimpse new technology providing low carbon heating and cooling to downtown Toronto buildings. CBC climate reporter Emily Chung is our guide – to see this first of its kind project in Canada. Proponents say it's key to cutting emissions from buildings around the country.

Duration:00:18:10

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Why this Black queer activist is fighting for climate, too

5/1/2024
Climate change may be last on your mind when you're dealing with discrimination, insecure housing and other barriers. But marginalized communities are hit harder than most by the impacts of climate change. Our columnist Chúk Odenigbo and activist Shelly-Ann Skinner walk us through how to meet Black, queer folks where they're at in order to include them in climate justice work. Then, we hear from an Ontario woman who's being recognized for her fight against climate change – and city hall – one lawn sign at a time.

Duration:00:26:26

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Coke or Pepsi? Revealing the biggest plastic polluters

4/27/2024
Yep, we’re naming names! We meet a researcher who combed through millions of pieces of plastic trash and traced half of the branded items back to just 56 companies. We hear the case for why manufacturers should be responsible for their plastic products and how addressing this can help lower CO2 emissions to tackle the climate crisis. And – we dish the dirt on cleaning your plates, cutlery and more after a listener wrote in to ask: is the dishwasher or washing by hand better for the planet?

Duration:00:22:55

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Teens can't wait 'til grownups get it

4/24/2024
Their eco-anxiety is real, and they're helping each other with it even as adults play it down. We hear from two high schoolers in New Brunswick who are finding ways to cope — and even educating the willing grownups in their lives. And our mental health columnist Abhay Singh Sachal is worried about gaps he sees in modern psychology education. If tomorrow's therapists aren't climate aware, they risk "dismissing or downplaying" a key concern for their youngest clients. Plus, listeners weigh in on ways to reuse old clothes and linens — from creating a Dolly Parton-style bedsheet to Schitt's Creek dolls.

Duration:00:27:04

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Can Earth Day be badass again?

4/20/2024
In 1970, 20 million people showed up to fight for the environment on the first Earth Day. But more than five decades later – is it time for this much tamer global event to return to its radical roots? Organizer Denis Hayes recounts how – amidst other counterculture movements at the time – he transformed Earth Day from a campus teach-in to a national protest. As he approaches 80, Denis offers his best OG advice to the next generation of climate leaders. Then, environmental warriors Maria Blancas and Axcelle Campana share ideas on what a revamped Earth Day could look like – including making it a public holiday.

Duration:00:28:08

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New to What On Earth? Start here!

4/19/2024
The climate is changing. So are we. Twice a week we take you across Canada and around the world, in search of climate solutions. We love to hear from our listeners and regularly feature them on the show. Have a question? Email Earth@cbc.ca

Duration:00:01:56

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Drought is wreaking havoc on crops. Can gene editing help?

4/17/2024
Scientists are editing the DNA of canola, and more, to survive with less rain. Can this help farmers adapt to climate change? And – if you’re stressed about the climate cost of the clothes and linens that have reached the end of their life, we have the scoop on what to do with those old jeans and torn bed sheets.

Duration:00:25:00

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Buried under cities, rivers are a climate wonder in waiting

4/13/2024
Join us on a hunt to discover the lost waterways hidden below the streets of Montreal, Toronto and Vancouver, and find out how bringing creeks and rivers back to the surface can help our cities adapt to a changing world.

Duration:00:29:26

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Emily's story: one activist's journey through climate anxiety

4/10/2024
This episode from June 2023 just won the Mindset Award for reporting on the mental health of young people. Driven by fear of climate change, Emily Kelsall got involved in extreme forms of activism including arrest and jail. The 25-year-old has also come through a mental health crisis that landed her in hospital. It's all brought her a new perspective on climate action. Then, we hear from two people researching the connection between activism, mental health and our warming world.

Duration:00:40:55

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Can scooping orca poop help us save the whales?

4/6/2024
It’s like “CSI in the ocean,” only these scientists are racing against climate change off the coast of B.C. Next, a satirical spin on climate action with Canadian oil producers the brunt of the joke. Then, we head to Saskatchewan where drought is sparking debate over the waters in one lake.

Duration:00:31:47

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Beaches, backyards and baby salmon

3/30/2024
Join us on a climate-solutions field trip! First, we head to the beach to find out how Indigenous knowledge and western science are working to keep clams cool in extreme heat. Next, we hear why your backyard – or patio – can be abuzz with biodiversity by simply making some simple swaps. (Spoiler alert: It’s time to weed out the dandelions.) Then, we head out to the coast of Vancouver Island and wade through estuaries to understand how scientists and First Nations are sussing out where baby salmon will want to live in a climate-changed future.

Duration:00:54:11

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Get on the bus!

3/23/2024
Better transit service could help lower Canada’s emissions. But can more people get on board with buses, trains and subways? Experts and advocates explain how to use policy changes and behaviour “nudges” to make it happen. And listeners share stories about great public transportation, from Singapore to Tampa Bay. Then, we hear why there’s “blood in the water” as Canada’s carbon tax approaches its annual increase. Plus: some advice on how to share feelings about climate change in a way that helps you cope rather than crumble.

Duration:00:54:11

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Meet the guides finding safe paths through melting mountains

3/16/2024
Glaciers are retreating rapidly in Canada’s Rockies, bringing hazards to long-standing alpine routes. We visit Banff National Park to meet guides who are adapting to climate change in different ways. Then – we head to India, where for weeks farmers from the northern part of the country have been protesting in the streets, demanding changes that could help them fare better in a warming world. Next – like many new university students, our youth climate action columnist Aishwarya Puttur is learning to cook for herself. It has her reflecting on her family's own history of farming in India, and on the links between food, farming and sustainability.

Duration:00:54:12

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And the award goes to…

3/9/2024
Spoiler alert: the Barbie movie is not about climate change. But it passes the "climate change reality check." We hear why Good Energy developed a climate test for films and find out which two other Oscar-nominated flicks are also winners in this category. Next, a former NASA scientist tells us why a satellite launched into space to detect global methane emissions is a huge deal for the climate. And – Italy's government has just approved an ingredient that could be better for the environment, but not everyone's keen on cricket pizza. Find out how one Quebec lender's decision not to offer mortgages in some high-risk flood zones is sparking calls for Ottawa to protect homeowners in climate-vulnerable places. Finally, we look for answers to your questions about hybrid cars.

Duration:00:54:11