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From Our Own Correspondent

BBC

Insight, wit and analysis from BBC correspondents, journalists and writers telling stories beyond the news headlines. Presented by Kate Adie.

Location:

United Kingdom

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World News

Networks:

BBC

Description:

Insight, wit and analysis from BBC correspondents, journalists and writers telling stories beyond the news headlines. Presented by Kate Adie.

Language:

English


Episodes
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Inside the trial of Donald Trump

5/18/2024
Kate Adie presents stories from the US, Russia, Afghanistan, Germany and Bhutan It’s been a week of high drama in Manhattan as Donald Trump’s former ally and fixer, Michael Cohen took to the witness stand in the former President’s criminal trial. Kayla Epstein was watching events unfold in the courtroom in New York and reflects on what it might mean for Donald Trump’s re-election chances. A new front opened up in Russia’s invasion of Ukraine this week, as Russian troops made gains in the country’s north-east. Ukraine is still suffering from a lack of ammunition and personnel, even as the US long-promised aid begins to filter through to the frontline. Vitaliy Shevchenko has been finding out how Russian troops are being supplemented by fighters from Cuba. It’s been nearly three years since the Taliban took back control of Afghanistan in a rapid offensive. Since then, the freedoms that women had come to know, such as the right to education and work have been curtailed. John Kampfner has met one woman who embarked on a perilous journey to Canada The island of Fehmarn, off Germany’s north-east coast is something of an oasis for holidaymakers. But it’s also soon to be the entrance to the world’s longest underwater rail and road tunnel. Rail travel times from Hamburg in Germany to Copenhagen in Demark will reportedly be cut from around five hours to less than three. But for those living on the island – it’s changing a long-cherished way of life, and many are concerned about the threats to the region’s eco-system. Lesley Curwen has been speaking to some of the locals. At soaring altitudes, foragers in the Himalayan kingdom of Bhutan seek out a special parasitic fungus, highly prized for its therapeutic qualities. Sara Wheeler’s been hearing about the special status afforded to those who harvest the delicacy. Note: The programme script incorrectly stated that the Denmark-Germany tunnel will connect Germany and Denmark for the first time. Editor: Bridget Harney Series Producer: Serena Tarling Production Coordinator: Janet Staples

Duration:00:29:10

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Protests in Georgia

5/11/2024
Kate Adie presents stories from Georgia, Serbia, Colombia, Thailand and the Philippines Georgians have been protesting for weeks about a draft law requiring organisations to declare foreign funding, which many see as a turning point in Tbilisi's relationship with Russia and the West. Rayhan Demytrie explores why the law has proved so divisive. China’s President Xi Jinping has been on a tour of Europe this week, including a carefully timed visit to the Serbian capital, Belgrade. Guy De Launey witnessed a growing courtship and considers what Beijing's broader agenda might be. The Darién Gap, an expanse of inhospitable jungle between Colombia and Panama, is now the site of the largest migration crisis in the Western Hemisphere. The 70 mile route is fraught with danger, but for many people fleeing poverty and persecution, the deadly Darién is the only passageway to the US. Peter Yeung joined families crossing the Darién on foot. Chiang Mai in Thailand's north is popular with travellers who enjoy the famously laid-back atmosphere - but it recently recorded the worst air quality of any city in the world. William Kremer met people directly affected. You may have heard of J-pop and K-Pop – but have you heard of P-Pop? Philippine pop, or Pinoy pop is hoping to get a share of K-Pop's global success, but it’s determined to do so in its own, distinctly Filipino way. Hannah Gelbart has been to meet one of the most popular groups in Manila. Series Producer: Serena Tarling Editor: Bridget Harney Production Coordinator: Rosie Strawbridge

Duration:00:28:37

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US student protests and the youth vote

5/4/2024
Kate Adie introduces stories from the US, Portugal, the South China Sea, Argentina and Antarctica. University campuses across the US have been gripped by protests over the war in Gaza, with students demanding their schools divest from Israeli interests. Nomia Iqbal considers the ramifications of the protests for Joe Biden, who will need the youth vote on his side if he is to win re-election in November. In the days after the Hamas attacks, some 200,000 Israelis were evacuated from Israel's border regions with Gaza and Lebanon, and moved into temporary accommodation. While some have since decided to return home, others have decided to seek safety further afield, as Mark Lowen discovered in Lisbon. Confrontations between the Philippines and China are on the rise in the South China Sea, as the countries clash over a territorial dispute. Jonathan Head saw this maritime feud up close, while on board a Filipino coastguard ship as it came into contact with a Chinese patrol. Argentina's President Javier Milei was elected last year on a manifesto of slashing public spending. Yet, with inflation at 300 per cent, prices are still spiralling, and another national strike is on the horizon. Mimi Swaby discovers it’s a crisis that continues to affect all corners of this vast country. And we’re amid the icebergs and marine life of Antarctica, as Janie Hampton recounts her voyage to trace her family connections to the continent - revealing how the downfall of the Soviet Union led to the cut-price sale of a British research base. Series Producer: Serena Tarling Editor: Richard Fenton-Smith Production Coordinator: Katie Morrison

Duration:00:28:57

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The Rise and Fall of Nagorno Karabakh

4/27/2024
Katie Adie presents dispatches from Armenia, India, China, Belgium and the Middle East. The flight of more than 100,000 Armenians from Nagorno-Karabakh last year, after a rapid offensive by Azerbaijan, quickly faded from news headlines. Tim Whewell remembers how the self-declared republic first emerged, as the Soviet Union was in its last throes, and reflects on how nations are born, and re-buried. More than a billion Indians are heading to the polls over the next six weeks to vote in a general election. Prime Minister Narendra Modi's vision of a 'digital India' has been a policy priority during his leadership - but to what extent are the less developed parts of the country on board and online? James Coomarasamy visits a village in Karnataka. The Chinese government is focused on green growth, providing subsidies for the manufacture of solar panels and electric vehicles. Yet in some cities, factory workers have been laid off and fear being left behind. Laura Bicker reports from the once bustling manufacturing city of Dongguan. The Royal Museum for Central Africa in Belgium was originally built to showcase artefacts from the country's former colony, Congo. Today, visitors to the museum are encouraged to reflect on the impact of Belgium’s colonization, finds Beth Timmins. Reporters always carry some kind of baggage with them when they head off to cover a story. It was on a recent deployment that the BBC’s middle east analyst Sebastian Usher suddenly noticed that the often unwanted companion that seemingly always accompanied him on trips abroad… had suddenly gone missing. Series Producer: Serena Tarling Editor: Richard Fenton-Smith Production Coordinator: Katie Morrison

Duration:00:28:30

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The Ayatollah and Israel

4/20/2024
Kate Adie introduces dispatches on Iran, Ukraine, South Africa, Portugal and Hong Kong. As the world nervously watches the developments between Iran and Israel, Lyse Doucet reflects on the rise of Iran's Supreme Leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei. Since coming to power three decades ago, he has managed to avoid taking Iran into an all-out war - could that change as tensions continue to rise? A missile attack in the Ukrainian city of Chernihiv this week laid bare the weakness of the country’s air defences. Depleted ammunition supplies, as well as a worsening situation on the frontline, have heightened fears that the tide is continuing to turn against Ukraine in its war with Russia. Sarah Rainsford reports from Kharkiv. South Africa is preparing to go to the polls, and for the first time since the end of white-minority rule, the governing ANC party is predicted to get less than 50 per cent of the vote. As in many other countries, immigration is high on the list of many voters’ concerns. Jenny Hill reports from the border with Zimbabwe. Next week Portugal marks the 50th anniversary of the Carnation Revolution and its transition to democracy. Simon Busch met some of the men who joined the resistance against the country's former dictator Antonio Salazar, to find out what they think about politics in Portugal today. And exotic birds have adapted to live alongside humans in some of the world’s major cities – and in Hong Kong it's yellow-crested cockatoos that you might see swooping through the skyline. Stephen Moss tells the story of why they’re now thriving. Series producer: Serena Tarling Production coordinator: Katie Morrison Editor: Richard Fenton-Smith

Duration:00:28:55

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A perilous moment between Israel and Iran

4/13/2024
Kate Adie presents stories from Israel, Nigeria, the US, Lithuania and France Tensions between Iran and Israel this week have ramped up further after Tehran issued a warning that it would retaliate for a recent strike on the Iranian consulate in Damascus. Israel never claimed responsibility for the attack but is widely considered to be behind it. This has compounded fears the conflict between Israel and Gaza will spill into a wider regional war. James Landale has been on an air drop mission to Gaza and reflects on recent events. Ten years ago, 276 secondary school children were kidnapped in Nigeria's north-east by Islamist militant group, Boko Haram. Ninety one of the girls are still unaccounted for. Yemisi Adegoke went to meet some of the girls who escaped captivity – to hear about their memories of that day and its impact on their lives. Mental health experts have expressed alarm in the United States about an increase in the rates of suicide there, with a particularly steep rise among young people. Will Vernon went to North Carolina to investigate why the deaths are happening. Simon Worrall tells the story of the provenance of a wood panel painting by Rembrandt - a portrait of a beggar with a bulbous, drunkard’s nose. He traces it back from its origins in a Lithuanian Baltic Oak Forest to an auction house in Maryland. One hundred and twenty years after the ‘entente cordiale’ was signed between Britain and France, French troops this week took part in the Changing the Guard ceremony in London at the same time as their British counterparts in Paris. Hugh Schofield reflects on whether – despite appearances – the relationship has in fact grown more detached. Series Producer: Serena Tarling Editor: Bridget Harney Production Coordinator: Katie Morrison

Duration:00:28:49

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Returning to Rwanda

4/6/2024
Kate Adie introduces stories from Rwanda, Estonia, St Helena and Puerto Rico. This weekend marks the start of the genocide in Rwanda that led to the death of more than 800,000 people – most from the country’s Tutsi minority. Three decades on, Emma Ailes met those who, against the odds, survived the violence – but continue to live with the trauma to this day. Among those who survived the genocide is the BBC’s Victoria Uwonkunda, who was just 12 years old at the time. She recently returned for the first time in three decades, where she retraced her journey to sanctuary, and spoke to genocide survivors - and perpetrators - about the difficult path towards reconciliation and forgiveness. As a result of the conflict in Ukraine, NATO countries close to Russia, such as Norway, Latvia and Lithuania, are expanding their military conscription programmes. In Estonia - where military service is already mandatory – our correspondent Nick Beake met some of the country’s new recruits. Coffee from Jamaica to Ethiopia to Guatemala is a common sight in high-street cafes, but a more rarified blend comes from the Atlantic Island of St Helena. It’s high-quality and short-supply means it fetches a high price – but as Mark Stratton discovered, that doesn’t mean locals are reaping the benefits. It's hard to escape the Puerto Rican sound of reggaeton. Now a global phenomenon, it's created superstars in artists like Bad Bunny, Daddy Yankee and Vico C. Jane Chambers went to find out how this multi-faceted music reflects both the island’s culture – and politics. Series Producer: Serena Tarling Production Coordinator: Katie Morrison Editor: Richard Fenton-Smith

Duration:00:28:46

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Prospects for Peace in the Middle East

3/30/2024
Kate Adie introduces stories from Israel and the Palestinian Territories, India, Tibet, Ireland and Guinea. What are the prospects for peace between Israel and the Palestinians? Yolande Knell has been asking Israelis and Palestinians about their hopes and fears for the future, and whether the recent war in Gaza can be an impetus , or impediment, for a future peace settlement. In India, the Muslim minority which makes up about 200 million people, has been feeling under pressure as a result of the deepening religious polarisation that has marked Prime Minister Narendra Modi's time in office. Yogita Limaye has been hearing their concerns. China has introduced educational reforms in the western region of Tibet, which mean that most Tibetan children are now educated in boarding schools, where they are taught in Mandarin Chinese, not Tibetan. Micky Bristow hears concerns from parents that their Tibetan culture is being erased. Ireland has been experiencing a housing crisis, which has been compounded by a rise in people applying for asylum, and seeking shelter from the war in Ukraine. This has led to increasing numbers of homeless people on city streets. Bob Howard visited a cafe in Dublin that tries to makes the lives of the homeless a little easier. Guinea in West Africa has so many poisonous snakes, that it accounts for one in ten of all snakebite deaths in Africa. Despite this, there is only one specialised snakebite clinic in the whole country. so many people turn to traditional healers and natural remedies, with sometimes devastating consequences, as Sam Bradpiece has been finding out. Producers: Polly Hope and Arlene Gregorius Editor: Richard Fenton-Smith Production coordinator: Gemma Ashman

Duration:00:28:50

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Surviving 'chemical detention' in Belarus

3/28/2024
Kate Adie introduces stories from Belarus, Senegal, the US-Mexico border, Cambodia and Brazil. Political prisoners in Belarus attract less international attention than those in Russia - but there are far more of them, even in a smaller country. Many are women, held in a kind of house arrest known as 'chemical detention', under stringent rules which control their every move. Monica Whitlock gathered testimony from some living under these conditions. After months of political turbulence, Senegal eventually did hold its planned presidential election - and the popular vote brought Africa's youngest leader, 44-year-old Bassirou Diomaye Faye, to power. James Copnall reported on the final days of the campaign and reflects on how Senegalese democracy proved itself. Controlling migration to the United States will be one of the most contentious issues in this November's American presidential election. Amid talk of a crisis, and after record numbers of apprehensions of undocumented migrants by the US Border Patrol in December, Tim Mansel visited the border between Mexico and Arizona. Sand might seem as a cheap and almost inexhaustible resource - but far from it. With the world using up more than 50 billion tonnes of it per year, to make everything from skyscrapers to smartphones, reserves could soon run low. In Cambodia there's now a flourishing black market in illegal sand mining along the banks of the Mekong river, as Robin Markwell has seen. And Ione Wells, the BBC's new South America correspondent, explores her new base: the industrial megacity of Sao Paulo. Some people call it 'Rio's ugly sister', but she's found much to appreciate amid its high-rise sprawl.

Duration:00:28:31

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Putin: Russia’s modern-day Tsar

3/23/2024
Kate Adie introduces stories from Russia, Germany, Timor Leste and Oman At a recent gathering in a gilded hall in the Kremlin, Vladimir Putin thanked VIP supporters for his re-election. As he commenced his fifth term in office, he has reminded his voters that the annexation of Crimea is just the beginning of Moscow's ambitions. Steve Rosenberg reflects on how this latest election has emboldened the President but there are voices of opposition willing to take a stand in spite of the consequences. When German Chancellor Olaf Scholz pledged the country was seeing a paradigm shift, or Zeitenwende, in supporting Ukraine in the war against Russia, he did not foresee how this would divide public opinion over Germany's potential involvement in a military campaign. Damien McGuinness reports on the ongoing political rifts in Berlin. Timor Leste has had a troubled history and faces multiple economic and social challenges including malnutrition and rural poverty. But marine scientists are discovering that Timor Leste lies on a vast migration route for a wide range of ocean wildlife, which some hope could fuel a fledgling tourism industry, reports Michelle Jana Chan. And we're in Oman, where a journey to the medieval capital of Nizwa leads to a conversation about the changes for women in the country, with a female driving instructor. Women have been legally allowed to drive in the country for more than 2 decades, unlike its neighbour Saudi Arabia, and a rise in the number of women in the workplace means more women are getting behind the wheel, says Sara Wheeler. Series Producer: Serena Tarling Editor: Richard Fenton-Smith Production Coordinator: Katie Morrison

Duration:00:28:37

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No escape from Haiti

3/21/2024
Kate Adie introduces stories from Haiti, Chad, the Netherlands, Palau and Mexico. Haiti remains mired in crisis, with the capital in the grip of gang violence - more than 350,000 people have been displaced. Will Grant reports from Haiti's border with the Dominican Republic, where he has witnessed the growing desperation among people flocking to find food and supplies and escape the violence. It’s nearly a year since civil war erupted in Sudan between rival military forces - more than a million have fled to neighbouring countries, including Chad. Mercy Jumar covered the refugee crisis there last year and now returns to the border town of Adre. Despite his dramatic win in the 2023 elections, Dutch far-right populist Geert Wilders has abandoned his bid to become the next prime minister. After weeks of negotiations to try to form a coalition, he realised he couldn’t convince other parties to serve under him. Anna Holligan explains what happened. Western Pacific watchers have continued to warn that China is trying to gain more of a footing with the ocean's island nations that control large swathes of it. Frey Lindsay reports from Palau in the Western Pacific, which has long-standing ties to the US, but is increasingly being courted by China. From Parma ham to Cheddar cheese, Darjeeling tea to Islay whiskey, there are many fabulous foods and delicious drinks from around the world that help put towns, cities and regions on the map. But, often these places have a reputation for more than just one thing. As Proinsias O’Coinn discovered when he travelled to a world-famous town in Mexico.

Duration:00:28:39

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Life after the Lord’s Resistance Army

3/16/2024
Kate Adie presents dispatches from the Democratic Republic of Congo, Iran, the United States, Croatia and France. The brutality of Joseph Kony and the Lord's Resistance Army once made headlines around the world, as #Kony2012 became a global social media cause. While the world soon moved on, the forgotten victims of LRA violence living in the Democratic Republic of Congo are still trying to heal. Hugh Kinsella Cunningham reports from Haut-Uele province. The Islamic Revolution in Iran put an end to a once thriving cabaret culture and music scene. But over the years, people have still found ways to party - albeit underground and out of sight of the religious police. Among them was Faranak Amidi, who’s met some of Iran’s women DJs, who dream of playing to clubbers all over the world. A controversial court ruling in Alabama has divided Christian conservatives on the issue of reproductive rights, as the state's supreme court ruled that frozen embryos should be considered as children. Nomia Iqbal reports on the schism that has emerged between pro-life Republicans. Rab Island off the north coast of Croatia was once home to a lesser-known Italian concentration camp, where some 4,000 people were killed during World War Two. Mary Novakovich visited the island, where she met a woman who began her life in one of the camps. And our Paris Correspondent Hugh Schofield takes on the challenge of running the city's half-marathon - with some welcome assistance from The Rolling Stones. Producer: Serena Tarling Production coordinator: Katie Morrison Editor: Richard Fenton-Smith

Duration:00:28:42

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Channel migrant deaths on the rise

3/14/2024
Kate Adie presents stories from France, India, the US, Panama and Spain. It’s been a year since the UK signed a deal with France to help reduce the number of boats crossing the Channel and break up the smuggling gangs. And whilst the number of crossings is falling, there’s been a sharp rise in migrant deaths, mostly by drowning, as they take ever greater risks to reach the UK. Andrew Harding is in Calais to find out why. In the coming days, India will be calling national elections. Voting will take place over several weeks. Prime Minister, Narendra Modi, seems unstoppable, with many expecting he will win a third consecutive term in office. Samira Hussain examines his enduring popularity. The film Oppenheimer, about the creator of the atomic bomb, dominated the Oscars with seven Academy awards. Much of the film is set in the town of Los Alamos, in New Mexico where physicist J Robert Oppenheimer carried out his research. Emma Vardy reports on its lasting effects on local communities. The Panama canal is vital to international trade, providing an essential shipping route and a short cut between the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. But, as Michelle Fleury explains, fewer ships are able to use it at the moment, because of a drought. And in southern Spain, we join Polly Hope in Seville cathedral, amongst the visitors and the faithful as they mark Lent with a procession through the historic streets of the city. Producer: Sally Abrahams Production co-ordinator: Sophie Hill Editor: Richard Fenton-Smith

Duration:00:28:44

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Haiti: ‘There’s nothing but the gangs’

3/9/2024
Kate Adie presents stories from Haiti, South Korea, the US, Senegal and the Vatican City. Haiti's government have declared a state of emergency after armed gangs attacked the country's airport and stormed two of the main prisons. Harold Isaac gives a first-hand account of the chaos that unfolded and how the capital went into full lockdown. South Korean women are increasingly shunning the dating scene and choosing not to have children. And the country's birth rate recently fell again, to just 0.72. This poses a serious problem for South Korea's economy and its security, with politicians describing it as a national emergency. But, as Jean MacKenzie finds, they've been unable to reverse the trend. Mouse Green travels on the freight trains criss-crossing the US, some of which stretch over two miles long. He meets members of the counter-culture community who call the rail cars home and uncovers a hidden world. Senegal has been a beacon of stability in the Sahel region, which has seen a series of coups over recent years. But, as Beverly Ochieng reports, the move by the West African country's outgoing President, Macky Sall, to delay elections sparked outrage. It also follows a clampdown on the opposition over the last year. Sara Monetta goes on an exclusive tour of the Sistine Chapel to watch how technology is being used to maintain Michelangelo's famous frescoes, as millions of people visit the museum every year. She describes the painstaking process of identifying any signs of deterioration and meets the experts involved. Series Producer: Serena Tarling Editor: Richard Fenton-Smith Production Coordinator: Katie Morrison

Duration:00:28:49

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Nigeria’s growing economic crisis

3/7/2024
Kate Adie presents stories from Nigeria, Ukraine, Iran, Uzbekistan and Nepal. Nigeria is experiencing its worst economic crisis in a generation, with soaring inflation and a depreciating currency, making many basic food items unaffordable for the majority. Mayeni Jones describes the challenges of daily living in a country where inflation is around 30 per cent. In the eastern Donetsk region of Ukraine, several villages have been captured after Russian forces took control of the town of Avdiivka last month. James Waterhouse has been to cities just behind the front-line as they prepare for what might be coming their way Turnout in Iran’s parliamentary elections last week was at a record low of 41 per cent - though voters had a limited choice, as only candidates approved by the Supreme Leader’s Guardian Council could stand. Our correspondent, Caroline Davies, was given rare permission to report from the capital Tehran, where young people explained why they chose not to vote. We travel to Uzbekistan, a Muslim-majority country – but, as we discover, not all visitors are in tune with the country’s traditional conservative values. Chris Aslan reports on how religious piety is increasingly being embraced in the country. And, for those climbing Mount Everest, the world’s highest peak, it's not just reaching the summit that's taking their breath away. Our Environment Correspondent, Navin Singh Khadka, finds out what's causing a stink. Producer: Sally Abrahams Production Co-ordinator: Sophie Hill Editor: Richard Fenton-Smith

Duration:00:28:20

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Gaza’s Humanitarian Nightmare

3/2/2024
Kate Adie presents stories from Gaza, Turkey, Somalia, Ecuador and Japan. US President Joe Biden raised hopes that a ceasefire deal was close to being reached this week over the release of Israeli hostages and Palestinian prisoners. But these hopes faded after a tragic incident in which more than 100 people were killed as aid was being delivered to Gaza City. Paul Adams says the incident also highlighted wider problems as the war continues. Lizzie Porter follows the story of a family who fled Gaza early on in the war, and who fled to Turkey as dual nationals, leaving family, friends and valuables behind. They told her about their new life in Turkey and their fears for those left behind. After the militant group, Al Shabaab withdrew from the Somalian capital Mogadishu, the city has become safer. Nonetheless the group remains a potent threat. Yet there is an even greater menace in the country: climate change, after severe droughts, followed by flooding forced farmers off their land. Peter Oborne met some of those who were displaced and who are trying to support themselves in other ways. A project in Ecuador is using the Amazon’s “ancestral highways” – rivers – and a fleet of solar-powered boats run by Indigenous communities to provide a sustainable model of transport for the future. Peter Yeung went for a ride and heard how this has been met with a mixed response by some indigenous leaders. And we're in Inazawa in Japan, where the Hadaka Matsuri - or Naked Festival - has come up with a solution to flagging numbers of participants: involve women. Shaimaa Khalil met a group of 40 women who took part (in robes) for the first time. Series Producer: Serena Tarling Editor: Matt Willis Production Coordinator: Rosie Strawbridge

Duration:00:28:49

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Trump edges closer to Republican nomination

2/29/2024
Kate Adie presents stories from the US, Indonesia, Georgia, Thailand and Colombia. Donald Trump’s only Republican rival for the US presidency, Nikki Haley, says she’ll fight on, despite roundly losing to him in her home state of South Carolina, where she was governor twice. Our Correspondent, Will Vernon, joined Republican campaigners in South Carolina, as they went door-to-door. In Indonesia, Prabowo Subianto, a former army general with a questionable past humans rights record, is set to become the country’s next president. Our South East Asia Correspondent, Jonathan Head, remembers first meeting Mr Subianto, when he served under the dictator General Suharto. Thousands of babies in the former Soviet Republic of Georgia were stolen from their parents at birth and sold. Our Correspondent, Fay Nurse, meets some mothers who were told their new-borns had died suddenly, but who now wonder if they may still be alive. Thailand is moving a step closer to legalising same-sex marriage. In Bangkok, Rebecca Root meets couples who are keen to tie the knot. And we’re in Colombia, where a literary festival encourages people to debate divisive issues without turning to violence. Kirsty Lang finds out more. Producer: Sally Abrahams Production Co-ordinator: Sophie Hill Editor: Matt Willis

Duration:00:28:55

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Ukraine: Two Years of War

2/24/2024
Kate Adie introduces dispatches from Ukraine, Russia, the USA and Georgia. Sarah Rainsford was in Ukraine when Vladimir Putin first launched his full-scale invasion two years ago, reporting on the defiance and rush to defend the country. On a recent trip back to the border city of Kharkiv, she found a much more sombre mood. Steve Rosenberg reflects on how the death of Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny, along with two years of war with Ukraine, has affected the outlook of many ordinary Russians. Many wish for change, but are unclear on how that can be achieved. Over recent months, the stalled passage of a $60bn military aid package through the US Congress has heightened concerns that Washington’s support for Ukraine is on the wane. Anthony Zurcher reflects on how the current US position has changed since his trip to Kyiv in the weeks before the Russian invasion began. Georgia has become a prime destination for Russians fleeing the war with Ukraine, especially those escaping conscription. The sudden arrival of tens of thousands of Russians has proved overwhelming at times, and given Georgia’s own past conflict with Russia, not everyone is happy to see them, reports Vitaliy Shevchenko. Since Russia’s invasion, more than 6 million Ukrainians have sought refuge overseas – but many people have stayed put, often by choice, determined to carry on living their lives as they have always done. Caroline Eden meets some market traders in Ukraine’s southern port of Odessa, who are trying to ensure it's business as usual. Series Producer: Serena Tarling Production coordinator: Katie Morrison Editor: Richard Fenton-Smith

Duration:00:28:57

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Talking and listening in an insecure world

2/22/2024
Kate Adie introduces dispatches from Germany, the Red Sea, Argentina, the Hungary-Serbia border and Costa Rica. BBC security correspondent, Frank Gardner takes us behind the scenes at the Munich security conference, where the sudden announcement of the death of Alexei Navalny brought home the diplomatic challenges facing world leaders. Iran-backed Yemeni Houthis say they will continue to target ships in the Red Sea, in solidarity with Palestinian people in Gaza. This has had a major impact on global shipping and the US and UK has retaliated with air strikes. BBC Persian’s Nafiseh Kohnavard has been given rare access to US navy warships patrolling in the Red Sea. In Argentina, President Javier Milei, has defended his huge public spending cuts after annual inflation in the country soared beyond 250 per cent. Our South America correspondent, Ione Wells, has been finding out what people in Argentina make of his controversial plans for change. Migration continues to fill headlines – from the ongoing saga of the Rwanda asylum plan to Republicans playing hardball over how to stem illegal crossings on the US-Mexico border. Our Central Europe correspondent, Nick Thorpe, is never far from a border flash-point, and reflects on the characters he has crossed paths with on the frontier of Hungary and Serbia. Costa Rica is often portrayed as a gold standard of eco-tourism and its Corcovado national park is one of the best places on earth to watch wildlife. But, there are concerns that some species there are in decline, in part due to illegal gold mining, hunting and logging in the region. Qasa Alom has been exploring the challenges. Producer: Sally Abrahams Production coordinator: Sophie Hill Editor: Richard Fenton-Smith

Duration:00:28:57

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Reporting Gaza

2/17/2024
Kate Adie presents stories from Israel and Gaza, Guyana, Finland and the USA. International media have been campaigning to gain access to Gaza in the months since the Israeli bombardment began - with only occasional access granted, which is closely supervised by the Israeli military. More often, news organisations have relied on Palestinian journalists already living and working in Gaza, who continue to operate under dangerous conditions. Jeremy Bowen reflects on the difficulties of telling the story of the Israel-Gaza war. After Guyana discovered it had substantial oil reserves almost ten years ago, its economy was quickly transformed and it's now the world's fastest growing economy. But its neighbour, Venezuela, recently contested Guyana's claim to oil-rich Essequibo region, which makes up two-thirds of Guyana's territory, reviving a centuries-old territorial dispute. Michelle Jana Chan went to see how the country had changed. Alexander Stubb was elected as Finland's president in polls last weekend, heralding a more hawkish approach to Russia. Finland acceded to NATO last year, and has a strategic role to play given its long border with its giant neighbour. Emilia Jansson reflects on what sort of President, Mr Stubb will be - and on what the presidential campaign revealed about Finnish attitudes. And in the US, the decor of the Oval Office in the White House is always closely watched when there's a change of President. Donald Trump's military flags were replaced with busts of influential figures from America's past, ranging from Franklin D. Roosevelt to Rosa Parks. Nick Bryant reports on what the contents of the President's bookshelf might reveal. Series Producer: Serena Tarling Editor: Richard Fenton-Smith Production coordinator: Katie Morrison

Duration:00:28:36